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Today, a conversation about the relationship between religion and environmentalism on another installment of Living Questions, a monthly series exploring faith in the public sphere. 

Some have decried President Trump’s withdrawal from the Paris Climate Accord as a “dishonor” to God. To what extent does faith play a role in motivating environmental activists? What do religious scriptures and faith leaders say about the human responsibility to protect the earth?

Rabbi Nina Beth Cardin is a Baltimore-based rabbi, writer, and environmental advocate.  She is the director of the Baltimore Jewish Environmental Network at the Pearlstone Conference and Retreat Center. She is also the founder of the Baltimore Orchard Project, a non-profit coalition of Baltimorians dedicated to growing the urban orchard and providing free healthy local fruit to people living in Baltimore’s food deserts.

Jodi Rose is the executive director of Interfaith Partners for the Chesapeake, a 5-year-old network of nearly 200 congregations working on the restoration and protection of the Chesapeake watershed.

Emmalee June Aman is a convert to Islam and the founder and lead advocate of Winds of Change Advocacy, a consulting business which advises environmental groups on effective ways to organize and mobilize. She also helps lead the Dayspring Permaculture Garden, a communal farming experiment underway on a private 200-acre environmental preserve and interfaith retreat in Germantown, MD.

Photo by Richard Anderson

Midday theater critic J. Wynn Rousuck is back for her weekly review of a local production! Today, she discusses Baltimore Center Stage's Jazz, the world premiere of Nambi E. Kelley's adaptation of Toni Morrison's 1992 novel. Directed by Kwame Kwei-ArmahJazz depicts the turbulent relationship of a couple living in 1920s Harlem. 

Jazz runs at Baltimore Center Stage on North Calvert Street through Sunday June 25th.

Courtesy University of Maryland Medical Center website

Most teen car crashes occur because of driver inexperience. Research shows that clocking hours behind the wheel, with an experienced driver present, increases a teenager’s confidence and capability to react in an emergency. We speak with two advocates for the University of Maryland Children’s Hospital “Practice Driving with Your Teen” sticker campaign: emergency pediatric-medicine resident Dr. Lahila-Carina Ojeda, and Cliff Tompkins, whose 7-year-old son died in a crash involving a teenager’s inexperience. Learn more about the campaign here and connect to an emergency driving course here.

As the Supreme Court approaches the end of its annual term, we catch up with University of Baltimore law professor Michael Meyerson about Justice Neil Gorsuch, President Trump’s travel ban, and the Court’s rulings on racial gerrymandering.

Philip Montgomery for The New York Times

Today another installment of the Midday Culture Connection with Dr. Sheri Parks of the University of Maryland, College Park. Presidential senior advisor and first son-in-law Jared Kushner’s meeting with a Russian banker back in December is the subject of a federal and congressional investigation. ProPublica reporter Alec MacGillis conducted his own investigation into Kushner that hits closer to home. Kushner Companies owns and operates 15 apartment complexes in the Baltimore area. Although Kushner stepped down as CEO in January he’s still a stakeholder, with a share of the company estimated to be worth at least $600 million. 

Comedian Chris Gethard is known for tackling tough subjects - like anxiety and depression - with vulnerability and candor. He joins us to talk about his podcast, "Beautiful Stories from Anonymous People," and why his talk show shuns traditional style for a more absurdist approach. Gethard will be performing at The Ottobar on Sunday, June 11th, the early show is a taping of his podcast.

600 Cherry Hill Road, Part I

Jun 5, 2017
all photos by Wendel Patrick

This place, people counted it out to drown.  But Cherry Hill is literally that.  We are a hill.  I don’t care how much water you surround us by.  We are a hill that will always stand and will always be bold.

Courtesy Harper Collins Publisher

With more than 6,000 hours of shows logged during an influential career that spanned more than 30 years, David Letterman’s impact on the landscape of late-night is unquestioned.    On today's Midday, a closer look at the life and work of the trend-setting funny man, through the eyes of a writer-journalist who's spent the past three years sizing up the Letterman legacy. 

Jason Zinoman writes about comedy for the New York Times, and has contributed to Slate, the Guardian and Vanity Fair.  He’s the author of three books:  Shock Value, a chronicle of the horror film industry, and Searching for Dave Chappelle, a probing look at the unexpected twists and turns in the career of that brilliant comedian. 

David Ross shares a Stoop Story about childhood lessons from his grandmother, and how those lessons changed as he grew up. You can find his story and others at stoopstorytelling.com.

Food, music, art projects--and voter registration? The No Boundaries Coalition of West Baltimore is celebrating its 10th Annual Boundary Block Party tomorrow at Pennsylvania Avenue Triangle Park. The alliance of eight neighborhoods brings together residents across lines of class, race, and neighborhood, and encourages them to connect over issues like political engagement and the Baltimore police consent decree. We speak to two members of No Boundaries, Carol Moore, who serves on its board and co-director Ray Kelly.

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