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Cocaine in your cough drops, tobacco in your toothpaste. Internist Dr. Lydia Kang tells us about mystifying medical practices of yesteryear. Her new book is, “Quackery: A Brief History of the Worst Ways to Cure Everything”.

AP Photo

In this edition of the Midday News Wrap, we focus on the status of the Republican plan to overhaul the tax code. The GOP-controlled House and Senate have hammered together separate plans that propose a $1.5 trillion tax cut, but with a different set of rates, different deductions and on a different timetable.  Democrats, and not just a few Republicans, reject both plans as tax windfalls for the rich that assault America's middle class and threaten the poor. 

To help us sort out some of the key parts and operating principles of the GOP tax plans, we turn to Marshall Steinbaum , Research Director and a senior fellow at the Roosevelt Institute, an economic think tank based in New York.  Mr. Steinbaum joins Tom from NPR studios in Washington DC.  

Associated Press Photo

President Donald Trump is in the final stretch of his marathon, 12-day swing through Asia that has taken him to Japan, South Korea and China. He arrived in Vietnam Friday, and over the weekend  he travels to the Philippines for a regional security summit, before heading back to Washington Tuesday. 

The often-bombastic US president toned down his rhetoric against North Korea during his diplomatic tour, stating in Seoul, South Korea, that America was not seeking "conflict or confrontation."  Mr. Trump also presented a far softer side during his two days in China, the world's number-two economic power, where he arrived to much pomp and circumstance.  As President Xi asserts his power within China and around the world, is President Trump's new welcoming approach to Beijing a diplomatic masterstroke or something less ?   

Weston Konishi joins us in Studio A.  He’s a Senior Fellow at the Maureen and Mike Mansfield Foundation in Washington, D.C.   

Also joining the conversation is Matthew Pennington.   He reports from Washington on US-Asian affairs for the Associated Press, and formerly served as the AP’s correspondent in Southeast Asia, Pakistan and Afghanistan.  He joins us from the AP's Washington studios.

Photo courtesy Peabody Institute

Tom's guest today is celebrating a homecoming, of sorts.  Since receiving his artist diploma in conducting from The Peabody Institute eight years ago, conductor Joseph Young has appeared with orchestras throughout the US and around the world.   Now, he’s back in Baltimore, and back at Peabody, but he’s not a student this time.  He’s the newly appointed Director of Ensembles at the world renowned conservatory. 

He’s conducting one of those ensembles, the Peabody Chamber Orchestra, in a concert tomorrow night at Peabody's Griswold Hall at 8:00pm, in a program that will include music by Bach, Ravel and Haydn.  Click here for details about this free concert.  But right now, Joseph Young is Tom's guest in Studio A...

Here’s a Stoop Story from Kate Hanlon, about her younger sister, their loving mother, and a Nike sweatshirt. You can hear this story and many others at stoopstorytelling.com, as well as the Stoop podcast.

The next live Stoop show is November 16th at 8 pm the Creative Alliance. The theme is, "My Freaky Family". Tickets available here.

Whether it is gathering dust in a drawer or worn every day, nearly every one owns jewelry. And real or fake, this form of ornamentation has a story to tell. Shane Prada, director of the Baltimore Jewelry Center, tells us about a new exhibition, Radical Jewelry Makeover: Baltimore, that takes cast-off pieces and gives them new life. And Artist Mary Fissell describes the appeal of jewelry making.

Radical Jewelry Makeover: Baltimore is on display at the Baltimore Jewelry Center until February 4.

Photo courtesy Ira Forman

Today it's another edition of Living Questions, our monthly series on religion in the public sphere, produced in collaboration with the Institute for Islamic, Christian and Jewish Studies.

We focus today on the persistent problem of anti-Semitism.  Acts of bigotry and intolerance toward the Jewish community in the US are on the rise, with a particular spike after the Unite the Right rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, this summer.  There have been 60 more incidents in our region this year than occurred in 2016.  And we’re not talking about anonymous trolls on the internet.  These are physical incidents of bullying and vandalism, which often take place on school and college campuses. 

Tom's guest on today's Living Questions segment is Ira Forman, a distinguished visiting professor at Georgetown University and senior fellow at the University's Center for Jewish Civilization. Professor Forman, who has worked for more than forty years as a leading advocate for Jewish culture and community, is currently teaching a course in Contemporary Anti-Semitism.  Previously, he spent four years as the State Department’s Special Envoy to Monitor and Combat Anti-Semitism.  Forman and most other Obama political appointees were asked to resign their positions this past January by the incoming Trump Administration; the Special Envoy post is still vacant.  What does that vacancy signal about current U.S. engagement in programs to combat anti-Semitism? What has the US Government traditionally done and what should it be doing at home and abroad to stop the curse of religious intolerance?  

Photo by Jim Preston

Theater critric J.Wynn Rousuck joins us in Studio A every Thursday with a review of one of the region's thespian offerings, and this week, she tells us about a new production of Origin of the Species now on stage at Strand Theater Company in Baltimore.

Returning combat veterans often wrestle with post-traumatic stress disorder, the aftermath of brain injuries or chronic pain. Relief can be fleeting. Dr. Carol Bowman, medical director for patient and family-centered care at Veterans Affairs, tells us about holistic therapies used successfully to treat military veterans. We also meet Renee Dixon, executive director of Freedom Hills Therapeutic Riding program in Cecil County, and participant Don Koss, a Vietnam vet, to learn how just being near horses can have a calming effect.

St. Martin's Press

In jurisdictions throughout Maryland, in New Jersey and in Virginia, and elsewhere yesterday, Democrats picked up wins in Mayor’s offices, Governor’s Mansions and State Houses. At the top of the Virginia ticket, Democratic Lt. Governor Ralph Northam walloped former RNC Chair Ed Gillespie by nine points, in a race that many around the country saw as a referendum on the Presidency of Donald Trump.

It was on this day, November 8th, one year ago, that Trump shocked the world when he completed his transition from campaign joke to President- elect. We are marking that anniversary today with a conversation with E.J. Dionne and Norman Ornstein, two of America’s most astute and respected political observers who are also the authors of a persuasive and insightful new book.

The book is called One Nation After Trump: A Guide for the Perplexed, the Disillusioned, the Desperate and the Not-Yet Deported. They wrote it with Thomas Mann of the University of California and the Brookings Institution.

E.J. Dionne is a senior fellow at Brookings, a syndicated columnist at The Washington Post and a visiting professor at Harvard University.

Norm Ornstein is a resident scholar at the American Enterprise Institute and a contributing columnist and editor at the Atlantic and the National Journal. They joined Tom from a studio at Harvard University in Cambridge, Mass.

Lisa Nickerson/Kennedy Krieger Institute

When an adult has a stroke, signs and symptoms are often recognizable. But what if the victim is a toddler? Or an infant … someone who may not be able to sense or communicate that something is amiss? Pediatric stroke is more common than you think. We hear from Dr. Frank Pidcock, medical director of Kennedy Krieger Institute's ‘Constraint Induced Movement Therapy’ program. Then we visit Brooklynn, who suffered a stroke at the age of one and a half, and her mother, Nikki Wolcott at a therapy session.

Ivy Bookshop

In his new history: "Revolution Song: A Story of American Freedom," Russell Shorto Russell Shorto traces the disparate lives of six people in the 18th century, from slave to general to aristocrat … and what freedom and the American Revolution meant to each of them. We meet a black man enslaved in Africa who engineers his freedom in America and an Indian warrior steering between his instincts and the will of his people. There’s an English aristocrat, an American-born daughter of a British officer , a shoemaker who becomes a local politician, and a Virginia planter named Washington. Shorto writes that we are still fighting the Revolution.

Centers for Disease Control

To date, more than 60 women have accused Hollywood producer Harvey Weinstein of sexual misconduct. The accusations range from indecent exposure to rape. A new piece in the New Yorker written by Ronan Farrow alleges that Weinstein hired private investigators to collect information on his accusers and the journalists who tried to expose him in an effort to suppress stories about his predatory behavior.  

In the days after the New York Times published the initial story on Weinstein detailing a few of the allegations, more people came forward with sexual assault allegations against other powerful men in Hollywood including producer James Toback and actor Kevin Spacey. At least 60 women have accused Bill Cosby of sexual assault; a majority of those accusations came to light in 2014 and 2015. The trial in one of those cases ended in a mistrial earlier this year. 

photos by Wendel Patrick

This is quite possibly the first time ever that a musical score for a podcast was written for, and performed by, a full symphony orchestra.   Here’s how it happened:  Out of the Blocks collaborated with the BSO for a special concert series called, “Baltimore Voices.” The concerts featured recordings of four Baltimore City teenagers sharing beautiful and honest stories about their lives.  Wendel Patrick composed an original score for each story.  And The Baltimore Symphony Orchestra performed Wendel’s scores live, while the stories aired on the sound system in the Meyerhoff Symphony Hall.

photo by Kenneth K. Lam - Baltimore Sun

We begin with a look at the Baltimore Police Department's trial board hearing that's considering, in the first of three administrative proceedings, whether disciplinary action should be taken against Officer Cesar Goodson, Jr., one of six officers indicted in the arrest and death of Freddie Gray in 2015.  He drove the van that transported Mr. Gray.  Goodson was acquitted of the charges, including one for second-degree "depraved heart" murder, brought against him by State’s Attorney Marilyn Mosby.  But last week and again today (Monday), he sat before a three-member panel engaged by the Police Department to determine whether or not his actions merit disciplinary action.

Of the six police officers originally charged in the Freddie Gray case, just three face trial board hearings: Goodson,  Lt. Brian Rice (tried and acquitted) and Sgt. Alicia White (charges dropped).  Trial boards for Rice and White are expected to begin, respectively, later this month and  sometime in December.  Officers Garrett Miller (charges dropped) and Edward Nero (tried and acquitted) chose to receive one-week suspensions rather than face the trial boards.  A sixth officer involved in the Freddie Gray case, William Porter (charges dropped), faces no discipline.

David Jaros is on the faculty of the University of Baltimore Law School.  Debbie Hines is an attorney in private practice in Washington.  They both paid very close attention to Officer Goodson’s criminal trial last year.  They join Tom in the studio to talk about what the trial board hearings say about the ability of the Baltimore Police department to police itself, and whether these disciplinary proceedings can restore community trust in the force.

Last week, CSX Transportation shocked the Hogan administration and local officials by withdrawing its support for an expansion of the Howard Street Tunnel. What does that decision mean for the city and for the Port of Baltimore? And, what does it mean for the current tunnel, which was built in the 1890s? It was the site of a large chemical fire after a 60 train-car pile-up, which did severe damage to underground infrastructure, 16 years ago.    

 Colin Campbell is a reporter for the Baltimore Sun who wrote about CSX's decision to tank the tunnel plans.  David Warnock is the co-founder of Camden Partners, a venture capital firm, and a former candidate for Mayor. They join Tom to talk about the Howard Street tunnel. 

Kamau High, managing editor of The Afro-American newspaper, joins Tom to talk about the local stories his newsroom is covering. There have been some changes in the leadership of the local chapter of the NAACP, and a racially-charged controversy erupted last week, when some students at local private schools dressed up as Freddie Gray for Halloween. 

Bruno Fazenda / Flickr via Creative Commons

More than 4,600 children in Maryland live in out-of-home placements such as foster care, and studies show that LGBT youth tend to be overrepresented in the foster system.

Judith Schagrin is the assistant director for children’s services for Baltimore County. She gives us an overview of the training potential foster parents undergo. And we hear from former foster youth who identify as LGBT.

Did their sexual orientation affect their experiences? Did they feel prepared when they left foster care? How does Baltimore County ensure foster parents stand by ALL children?

Over nearly five decades, BrickHouse Books has nurtured scores of authors whose voices might otherwise not have heard. It’s arguably the oldest continually operating small book publisher in Maryland. Since 1973 (circa photo), poet and author Clarinda Harriss has been BrickHouse’s editor and driving force … creating subdivisions to publish poetry and LGBT manuscripts. Proceeds from sales get reinvested in the next book. What keeps Harriss at it?

Here’s a stoop story from Joe Sugarman about becoming a father for the second time … and how he and his wife followed their birth plan a little too by-the-book. You can hear his story and others at StoopStorytelling.com

Jim Lo Scalzo - Shutterstock

The Republicans have proposed a sweeping overhaul to the tax code. Some of the changes involve deductions that have been baked into the cake of the code for generations, and the impact on the deficit is huge.  The President called for the death penalty for the man accused of killing 8 and wounding 12 in New York.  An excerpt from former interim DNC chair Donna Brazile's book is complicating matters for the Democratic Party as they continue to strategize an opposition to the Trump Administration.

Eugene Scott reports on politics and identity for the Washington Post politics blog, The Fix. He joins Tom to discuss the news of the week. 

Aaron Nah/Bush Chicken

For this portion of the Newswrap, Tom focuses on several major news developments on the African continent. 

Contentious presidential elections in Liberia and Kenya have dominated recent headlines, as results in both contests have been tainted by allegations of fraud. As Liberia attempts its first nonviolent transition to power in over seven decades, its Supreme Court has been the linchpin to peace, amid accusations of bribery and intimidation. 

In Kenya, while the courts have tried to uphold the electoral process, they have not been able to avert bloodshed: nearly 30 people have died during election-related protests, ethnic violence, and clashes with police.  

Finally, an examination of the situations in Niger and the Sahel, where four Green Berets were killed during US military operations, ostensibly in support of local anti-terrorism forces.  

Emira Woods is an Associate Fellow at the Institute for Policy Studies, a progressive think tank that works on social and economic justice issues. She joins Tom for an update on Africa. 

Photo Courtesy Full Circle Dance Company

We're going to take a look now at how creative artists are addressing a very serious and longstanding problem.  Domestic violence affects nearly one in four women.  According to The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and The National Institute of Justice, 22% of women experience at least one physical assault by a partner during their adulthood.

The Full Circle Dance Company has drawn on the stories of women affected by domestic violence to inspire their latest collaboration: a benefit performance this weekend called "Unshamed: Baring Our Secrets and Our Souls."

Joining Tom in Studio A to talk about the benefit performance -- and the difficult issue it's addressing --  is Donna Jacobs, the Artistic Director of Full Circle Dance Company, who is also a Senior Vice President at the University of Maryland Medical System

Dr. Carnell Cooper joins Tom as well.  He is an associate professor of surgery and the director of the Center for Injury Prevention and Policy at the R. Adams Cowley Shock Trauma Center at the University of Maryland Medical Center.

The Full Circle Dance Company performs "Unshamed: Baring Our Secrets and Our Souls" at the Chesapeake Arts Center in Brooklyn Park, Maryland. on Saturday, November 4 at 7:30pm, and on Sunday, November 5 at 2:30pm.  A portion of all ticket proceeds will be donated to the Bridge Domestic Violence Program at UMMS.   Click here for directions and ticket info. 

AM Joy

Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s Russia investigation now includes two indictments and a guilty plea. Writing yesterday in Vanity Fair Magazine, Gabriel Sherman reports that Steve Bannon is now openly worried about Donald Trump being impeached or removed under the 25th amendment, and that Bannon fears a revolt by some members of the cabinet, and the Republican establishment.

All of this is, of course, music to the ears of the Progressive Left. But should impeachment efforts form the fundament of the Trump resistance movement? Progressives, and many conservatives, for that matter, agree that Trump is unfit to serve in the highest office in the land. But what else do they agree on? Is there consensus about health care, tax policy, or counter-terrorism? What do Democrats stand for besides standing against Trump?

Tom's guest today is Joy-Ann Reid,  host of AM Joy on MSNBC, where she is also a political analyst. She is the author of the book "Fracture: Barack Obama, The Clintons and the Racial Divide," which was published in 2015, with an update in the summer of 2016. She co-edited "We Are the Change We Seek: The Speeches of Barack Obama," with E.J. Dionne of the Washington Post. That book was published earlier this year.

Joy-Ann Reid speaks at Johns Hopkins University tonight at 8 pm. Her topic:  journalism in the age of fake news.  Click here for more information.

Photo by ClintonBPhotography

It's Thursday, and that means theater critic J. Wynn Rousuck joins Tom with her weekly review of one of the region's many thespian offerings.   Today, she talks about Everyman Theatre's new production of Intimate Apparel, a play that premiered in 2003 at Baltimore's Center Stage.  It's a contemporary work written in classic style by Lynn Nottage, the first female playwright to win two Pulitzers.  

Inspired by a true story, Intimate Apparel centers on Esther (played by Dawn Ursula), a self-employed African American seamstress in turn-of-the-century New York who is working hard - and saving her money - making beautiful undergarments for her well-to-do clientele.  But she dreams of a grander life, while nurturing her fondness for a Jewish fabric merchant (played by Drew Kopas). As an emotionally wrenching turn of events puts Esther’s dreams at risk, the play explores the tenacity of the human spirit against the powerful pressures of class, race and culture. 

The play is directed by Tazewell Thompson.

Intimate Apparel continues at Everyman Theatre through Sunday, November 19th.

A month into office, President Trump declared the press to be the enemy of the American people. By several measures, hostility against journalists is ratcheting up. Beth Am Synagogue has asked four journalists to analyze “press freedoms under siege.”

We’ll hear from Ben Jacobs, a reporter who was bodyslammed by a Republican congressional candidate last spring, And TV producer David Simon, a former Baltimore Sun reporter, who will kick off the series this weekend.

Melissa Archer, MD Dept. of Housing & Community Development

At a packed Baltimore City Council hearing last week, housing advocates and others lent their support to a resolution put forward by Baltimore City Councilwoman Mary Pat Clarke, which calls on the city to revive the Dollar House program of the 1970s and early 80s:  Back then, the city sold more than 180 abandoned houses for $1 apiece, and helped the buyers with financing and renovation assistance.     

Clarke, a Democrat, has represented the 14th District on the Baltimore City Council since 2004.  From 1987-95, she was president of the City Council, the first woman ever elected to that position.  She ran unsuccessfully for mayor in 1995.

Clarke joined Tom today in Studio A. Later, Jay Brodie and Mike Posko joined the conversation.  Brodie was the commissioner of the city’s Housing Department from 1977 to 1984.  After that, he served as the president of the Baltimore Development Corp, the city’s quasi-public economic development arm. He did that for 16 years, serving under four mayors, until his retirement in 2012.  Posko is the CEO of Habitat for Humanity of the Chesapeake. Over the past 35 years, Habitat has built or renovated more than 700 homes throughout Central Maryland.

NASA

Jeffrey Kluger joins Tom in Studio A to talk about his latest book, Apollo 8: The Thrilling Story of the First Mission to the Moon, in which he makes the case that Apollo 8's historic orbital flyby of the Moon -- the first human venture beyond the bounds of close-Earth orbit -- was as important, if not more important, than the later mission, Apollo 11, that actually landed men on the lunar surface.

Kluger has been a science editor and senior writer for Time Magazine for more than two decades.  He’s the author of eight other works of fiction and non-fiction, plus some books for young readers.

He grew up in Pikesville, and he’s back in town for a reading of Apollo 8: The Thrilling Story Of The First Mission To The Moon  this evening at The Ivy Bookshop in North Baltimore at 7 pm.  

AP Photo/David Goldman

This month on "Life in the Balance," gangs and street violence in Baltimore is an epidemic. But what happens to those people who want to get out of gangs, what struggles do they meet on the way? We’ll meet Gardnel Carter, a former gang member who’s now helping others to avoid his past mistakes.  We’ll also talk with Media Chief T.J. Smith of the Baltimore City Police about the department’s efforts to stem gang violence, and we’ll hear the remarkable story of a 17 year old boy who’s trying to walk away from his own past with gangs.  The problem is his old associates are not happy about his decision. This hour, the uphill climb out of gang violence, the organizations trying to combat it, and the people whose lives hang in the balance. 

Weird Foods

Nov 1, 2017
T.Tseng/flickr

Chef Cindy Wolf and Tony explore the weirdest things they've tried to cook, interesting wine and food combinations, and Tony tries to get Cindy to tell a turtle story...

This is a rebroadcast. 

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