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Decoding Menus

Feb 25, 2018
chefwolf/Instagram

 

Ever wonder why a menu looks the way it does? This week, Tony and Chef Cindy break down how a menu gets built and how to decode even the most complicated bill of fare.

Photo courtesy Gun News Daily

On today's edition of the Midday News Wrap, we begin with Baltimore Brew founding editor and publisher, Fern ShenThis week, the Brew published a series documenting the ballooning problem of overtime abuse in the Baltimore police department.

Then, Luke Broadwater of the Baltimore Sun and investigative reporter Alec MacGillis of ProPublica  join Tom to review some of the week’s top local and national stories, from Police Commissioner-designate Darryl De Sousa’s confirmation hearing in the City Council, and the Governor and the Mayor of Baltimore taking a victory lap following hundreds of warrant arrests, to the national debate over gun regulation that’s been re-ignited by last week’s deadly mass shooting at a Florida high school.

Photo by Britt Olsen-Ecker

There are few names or brands more deeply entrenched in the American psyche than Walt Disney. The 20th century animation pioneer built an iconic business and entertainment empire on the shoulders of a talking mouse named Mickey.  By the time of his death from lung cancer in 1966 at the age of 65, Disney and his many multi-media enterprises -- from movies to theme parks -- had become an unparalleled force in American culture. 

Now, a new show at the Single Carrot Theater in Baltimore explores a side of Mr. Disney that's in stark contrast to his benign public persona.   The production is called "A Public Reading of an Unpublished Screenplay About The Death of Walt Disney," and joining Tom to talk about it is the  company’s artistic director, renowned actress Genevieve de Mahy.  

Erika Clark/Make Studio

Artists who face challenges -- whether physical, developmental or emotional -- find a welcoming space at Make Studio. This month marks eight years that the nonprofit has been fostering a creative, inclusive community for artists. Make Studio also provides access to materials, studio space and exhibition prospects. We meet Erika Clark, a member-artist for five years, and co-founder Cathy Goucher, who talks about the intangible support Make Studio offers. 

They'll celebrate the anniversary at GO FIGURE: MAKE STUDIO Celebrates Our 8th! More info here.

Rohai Zod tells a stoop story about cultivating a patriotic and parental love, and the sacrifice that comes with it. He told it at last year’s Strong City Stoop event called ‘Live and Learn: The Immigrant Experience.’ This year’s Strong City Stoop Storytelling theme is “Keep Calm and ___” on Feb. 23 at 7pm at the University of Baltimore’s Wright Theater. More info here.

Photo by Alyssa Eisenstein-Oxfam

Three-point-four million American citizens live on the island of Puerto Rico.  While efforts to rebuild communities in Texas and Florida after a series of deadly hurricanes last September are progressing steadily, 400,000 Puerto Ricans on the island are still without electricity, some five months after the wind and rain stopped. 

Noah Steinberg-Di Stefano has just returned from his second trip to Puerto Rico.  He’s with the Baltimore-based international aid group,  Lutheran World Relief.  He joins Tom in the studio.

Diane Jharriah-Robinson of Caritas-Antilles is working to restore stability and normalcy to the lives of the 73,000 people displaced by hurricanes on the tiny island of Dominica.  She joins us by phone from her field office in the Dominican capital, Roseau.

They give us an update on relief efforts, now that the TV cameras are long gone. 

Photo by Bill Geenan

It's Thursday, and that means theater critic J. Wynn Rousuck joins Tom in the studio with her weekly review, today spotlighting a new production at Baltimore's Center Stage.

From the playwright of Detroit ’67, Skeleton Crew (the third play in Dominique Morisseau’s acclaimed Detroit Trilogy) tells the story of four workers at the last exporting auto plant in Detroit struggling to survive as their way of life disappears.  Directed by Nicole A Watson, the play's cast includes Stephanie Berry as Faye, Sekou Laidlow as Reggie, Brittany Bellizeare as Shanita, and Gabriel Lawrence as Dez, portraying a team of loyal and proud workers trying to navigate their uncertain futures.

Part of the Women’s Voices Theater Festival

Skeleton Crew continues at Baltimore's Center Stage through March 4th.

Creative Commons/Flickr

The latest edition of the Goucher Poll shows that none of the eight Democrats running for governor has a commanding lead and that four months ahead of the primary, “undecided” polls higher than all the Democrats combined. Governor Hogan remains popular, the poll finds, but less than half intend to vote to re-elect him. We talk with pollster Mileah Kromer and political reporter Bill Zorzi to decipher what all the numbers mean. You can see all the results for yourself at this link.

Wikimedia Commons

The Congressional Research Service estimates that about 4.3 million people hold permanent government security clearances, but many close advisers to President Trump do not -- including presidential son-in-law Jared Kushner.

Last week, Director of National Intelligence, Dan Coates, said the system of approving security clearances for top officials is “broken” and must be overhauled. 

A couple of days after Coates’ Senate testimony, White House Chief of Staff John Kelly wrote a memo outlining an overhaul of how the White House manages security-clearance investigations. In that memo, obtained by the Washington Post, some White House staffers with Top Secret interim clearances, a group that may include Kushner, will lose their clearances on Friday.

Tom’s guests today are two reporters who have been covering national security matters for years. Deb Reichmann has written about national security for the Associated Press for the past six years.  Before that, she was an AP reporter in Afghanistan. She also covered the George W. Bush White House and the final year of the Clinton White House for AP. She joins us on the line from the AP studios in Washington. 

Scott Shane is a reporter with the investigative unit of the New York Times. He’s written about national security as a reporter in the Washington bureau of the Times since 2004. He’s also the author of several books, including Dismantling Utopia, on the Soviet collapse, and Objective Troy, about the American terrorist Anwar al-Awlaki.

Jason Lander / Flickr via Creative Commons

A year ago, Maryland began issuing licenses for direct-entry midwives--someone who is not a nurse, but is trained in the art and science of caring for expectant mothers. Few families choose home birth, but the number who do is on the rise.

Midwife Alexa Richardson walks us through the care midwives provide--before, during, and after birth--to ensure mom and baby are safe and healthy. And Lauren Turner, who had both her children at home and is a doula, describes the visceral experience of birth.

getty images/npr

Here are four things we know:

One is that Donald Trump is President of the United States.
Two is that, barring some unforeseen occurrence, Donald Trump will be President of the United States until, at least, January 20, 2021.
Third is that something that Trump says or does will draw criticism from significant portions of the American populace.
And fourth is that some of the people who criticize Trump will be athletes. In case you hadn’t noticed, many who are happy with the first two items are dismayed with people in the third group. That’s nothing new.

Karl Merton Ferron /Baltimore Sun

When Baltimore Police Commissioner Designate Darryl DeSousa appeared on Midday last Wednesday, he was quick to credit the efforts of Erricka Bridgeford, one of the founders of Baltimore Ceasefire 365, for the city’s 12 day streak with zero murders. 

It was in the days during and after the third Ceasefire weekend that began on February 2nd, that Baltimore experienced no homicides for nearly two weeks, the first time that has happened in our city since 2015.  Since then, three men have been killed: Sadik Griffin, John Townes, Jr., and Sean Sewell.    

Erricka Bridgeford cares about the disheartening data, but she also cares about the individuals who’ve lost their lives, and the devastating effects their deaths have on their families, their neighborhoods, and their communities.  She joins us today in Studio A. 

The efforts of Baltimore Cease Fire 365 to stem the tide of violence in Baltimore are on-going and next Ceasefire weekend is scheduled for Mother’s Day weekend, in May.

www.morgan.edu

Governor Hogan’s recent offer of $100 million dollars to settle the 12 year-old lawsuit filed by the state’s HBCU’s against the Maryland Higher Education Commission, was met with hope by some, and incredulity by others as the state admitted that the cost of reversing the legacy of discriminatory funding practices would actually cost billions. 

Debora Bailey, reporter for the AFRO Newspaper, and Dr. Earl Richardson, President Emeritus of Morgan State University, are in Studio A to discuss the road ahead for the Maryland’s Historically Black Institution.

 

Goodreads

In the first few pages of Sunburnwe learn that its main character has walked out on her family--just left her husband and young daughter on a Delaware beach, and hitchhiked west. As the tale unfolds, we’re treated to the tropes of film noir--slick dialogue as the protagonists circle each other in a mix of distrust and desperate infatuation. We talk to Laura Lippman about the inspirations behind her latest mystery.

Photo courtesy: The Executive Office of the Governor

Today, Maryland Governor Larry Hogan joins Tom live in Studio A.  He is one of only two Republicans elected to our state’s highest office in the last 50 years, and in a poll released last month by Gonzales Media and Research, 71% of MD voters said they approve of the job the Governor is doing.  While there is no shortage of Democrats vying for the chance to face the Governor in the general election in November, Mr. Hogan leads all of them in head-to-head match-ups at this early stage in the campaign. 

Calling for bipartisanship and cooperation in his State of the State Address last month, the Governor points to education funding and accountability, re-districting, and the environment as some of his top priorities.  Tom discusses some of those issues during his 30-minute interview with Mr. Hogan. 

Later, Maryland and government reporter for The Daily Record, Bryan Sears, joins us on the line with the latest from Annapolis and reaction to the Governor's remarks. 

Former University System Chancellor Brit Kirwan explains why it will take new policies as well as more money to bring Maryland’s K-12 schools to a world-class status.

Jeremy Keith/flickr

What makes a salad, a salad? In this week's episode, Tony and Chef Wolf describe the various types of salad, give a tutorial on how to make a basic vinaigrette and mayonnaise, and share what wines to pair with salad. And stay tuned for a Chef's salad challenge.

AP Photo by Wilfredo Lee

Joining Tom for the NewsWrap today are White House correspondents Ayesha Rascoe of Reuters and Tamara Keith of NPR.   

In the wake of another massacre at an American high school, politicians who oppose any move toward gun regulation are keeping the families in Parkland, Florida in their thoughts and prayers, and keeping the NRA satisfied that no significant changes to federal gun policy are likely.

The Senate fails to find a fix for DACA, and resignation of White House aide Robert Porter’s raises questions about how casually President Trump and his staff handle top secret intelligence. 

Nearly 40% of the President’s original picks for his cabinet have been involved in ethical controversies in the last year.  The latest is the head of the Veterans Administration.

Ayesha Rascoe and Tamara Keith join us on the line from NPR studios in Washington, D.C.

Photo by Katie Simmons-Barth

Theater critic J. Wynn Rousuck joins us today with reviews of two plays now running in the region:  Red Velvet, by the Chesapeake Shakespeare Company, and All She Must Possess, a world premiere at Rep Stage, on the Howard Community College campus.

Chesapeake Shakespeare's Red Velvet (profiled on Midday's January 31st showtells the story of Ira Aldridge, a celebrated and controversial African American actor who won international renown for his groundbreaking portrayal of Shakespeare's Othello at a London theater in 1833.  The play by Lolita Chakrabati is directed by Shirley Basfield Dunlap, and features Christian R. Gibbs as Ira Aldridge and Yuri Lomakin as a London theater manager.

All She Must Possess, directed at the Rep Stage by Joseph Ritsch, is the world premiere of a play by Susan McCully, who portrays the lives of Baltimore's Victorian-era Cone sisters -- Dr. Claribel and Etta Cone.  The iconic pair's passion for collecting art and curios from around the world brings them into the rarified company of many of the artistic and literary geniuses of their day, including avant-garde writer Gertrude Stein.

Red Velvet at Chesapeake Shakespeare Company, and All She Must Possess at Rep Stage in Columbia, both continue through February 25.

Here is a Stoop Story from Gwen Mayes about the lessons she’s learned from living with heart disease. You can hear her story and many others at stoopstorytelling.com, as well as the Stoop podcast.

Oregon Ridge Nature Center

Pancakes, waffles, ice cream--they all taste better with a drizzle of maple syrup. While Maryland isn’t known for commercial production of maple syrup, this month, you can get a locally-made taste at Oregon Ridge Nature Center. They tap maple and black walnut trees and turn sap turn into thick sweetness. We hear the ins and outs of making syrup and maple candy from the center’s Jessica Jeanetta.

It’s  Midday on Music and today we explore  music as a window into Muslim Culture, and the creative work of Muslim women, who are being celebrated in a series at the Creative Alliance in Baltimore this season called Nisa’a Women.  My guests this afternoon are Sudanese singer Alsarah and her band The Nubatones.  The group is in town as the second installment in the Nisa’a Women series.  They are conducting workshops at local schools, they’ll be at a community potluck for refugee and immigrant communities and they will give a concert at the Creative Alliance tomorrow night.

Later on, a discussion about the growing popularity of Contemporary African music. Despite Hip Hop  and Afrobeats artists dominating music charts around the world, they were not well represented at this year’s Grammy awards.  Stephanie Shonekan, University of Missouri Associate Professor of Black Studies and Ethnomusicologist, joins us on the telephone to discuss who wins awards, who doesn’t and  why.  

This live edition of Foreman Wolf on Food and Wine is chock-full of your calls and emails. From a father who gifted his son too many canned artichokes, some advice for a great beef stock, how to approach a wild goose and much more. It’s Foreman and Wolf and you on WYPR!

Creative Commons/Wikimedia

Hemp literally shares roots with the same plant that produces marijuana--they’re both cannabis. But as marijuana laws loosen in most states, the laws surrounding hemp production--including in Maryland--remain rigid. Environmental reporter Rona Kobell explains industrial uses for hemp, and how it could provide farmers with a potentially profitable choice in their crop rotation. And we meet Anna Chaney, a hopeful hemp farmer who talks about how growing it can benefit the soil.

Baltimore Police Department

Tom's guest today is the newly appointed chief of the Baltimore Police DepartmentDarryl De Sousa is the Commissioner-Designate.  His confirmation hearing at the Baltimore City Council is slated for a week from today.  Mr. De Sousa has been on the job for less than a month, but he’s been a member of the Baltimore Police Department for more than 30 years.  Prior to his elevation to Commissioner, he served as the top commander in the patrol bureau. 

Mr. De Sousa takes the reins of the department as it is reeling from revelations that surfaced at the trial of two officers who were convicted Monday night on racketeering and fraud charges.  Ironically, and much to everyone’s delight, for 12 consecutive days, as the trial was underway, Baltimore experienced no new homicides.  Ericka Bridgeford, the founder of Baltimore Ceasefire, tells us that the city hasn’t gone that long without a homicide since 2014.  The Baltimore Sun reported that an unidentified man was shot and killed in Belair Edison yesterday afternoon, in a district that the Commissioner Designate served as Commander years ago.

Against the backdrop of a city still beset by crime, hopeful of a turnaround, and in urgent need of a police force it can trust, Darryl DeSousa joins Tom in Studio A.

photos courtesy RealNewsNetwork; LEAP

Following his interview with Baltimore City Police Commissioner-Designate Darryl D. DeSousa in the first half of today's Midday, host Tom Hall welcomes to the studio two guests with keen insights on the many challenges facing Mr. DeSousa and his beleaguered department.

Joining Tom is Maj. Neill Franklin (ret.), the Executive Director of the Law Enforcement Action Partnership (LEAP), a national organization that advocates for criminal justice reform and healing police-community relations.  In his 34-year career, Major Franklin served in both the MD State Police and the Baltimore City Police Department.

Stephen Janis joins Tom as well.  He’s a journalist with The Real News Network, who has covered the city for many years as an award-winning investigative reporter for the Baltimore Examiner and WBFF (Fox 45) Television.

Jason Shellenhamer

Two archeologists and scores of volunteers have been probing, digging, sifting and cataloging to unearth the mysteries hidden under a park in the city’s northeast corner. A big manor house no one knew about, and more. How does it all connect to the power families of old Baltimore? We hear about it from Jason Shellenhamer and Lisa Kraus, who direct the Herring Run Archeology Project. They entice their neighbors to get their hands dirty alongside them, digging up stories that reveal the past. Shellenhamer and Kraus give a talk on the project at the Engineers Club of Baltimore on Sun., Feb. 18 at 2pm. More info here.

We are joined  by the Emmy Award winning filmmaker, Stanley Nelson, whose latest documentary chronicles the history of Historically Black Colleges and Universities.  The HBCU tradition in the United States was born out of necessity, animated after the Civil War by the conviction that education would be the foundation upon which the success of Freedmen and Freedwomen would be built. 

There are currently 101 HBCU schools, 20 fewer than in the 1930s.  Its graduates include Black luminaries like WEB DuBois, Thurgood Marshall, Spike Lee, Althea Gibson, and Toni Morrison.

Mr. Nelson’s film is called “Tell Them We are Rising: The Story of Historically Black Colleges & Universities.”  The film speaks of the history, the legacy and the importance of HBCU’s to the Black community and to the whole of American Society.    

On this edition of What Ya Got Cookin'?, Midday's regular series on cuisine, we speak with Culinary Historian Michael Twitty.  His new book is called “The Cooking Gene: A Journey through African American Culinary History in the Old South.” and is part personal memoir, part history, and part cook book.  It’s a startling and poignant chronicle of how people held in bondage, with little to nothing of their own, created a culinary tradition and a lasting cultural identity, and how the author came to understand his own identity by studying the ways in which his ancestors cooked.  He joins us from the studios of NPR in Washington.

Chef David K. Thomas joins our conversation as well.   He is the executive chef at Baltimore’s modern soul food restaurant, Ida B’s Table, named for Ida B. Wells, the famous African American journalist and activist who was born just a couple of years before the Civil War.  

You can learn more about Michael Twitty, and his work as a culinary historian on his blog, Afroculinaria.com 

DoD Photo by Navy Petty Officer 2nd Class Dominique A. Pineiro / Flickr via Creative Commons

In 2012, an investment company led by Jared Kushner--son-in-law and senior advisor to President Trump--and his father, Charles Kushner, began buying up apartments and townhomes in Baltimore County.

Over time, Kushner Companies’ filed hundreds of suits against tenants, even seeking unpaid rent from people who moved out of the property before Kushner Companies owned it.

Now Baltimore lawmaker Delegate Bilal Ali has introduced the “Jared Kushner Act”, which would prevent tenants from being subject to arrest for failing to pay rent.

We speak to Propublica reporter Alec MacGillis who broke the story last May. You can read the latest on the tenant's class action lawsuit here

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