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WYPR Programs

Scout out talented students at HBCUs, prepare them for the rigors of law school, mentor them throughout their careers. The Fannie Angelos Program for Academic Excellence aims to boost diversity in the legal profession.

We hear from the co-founders, University of Baltimore law professors Michael Higginbotham and Michael Meyerson, and we meet two graduates at the start of their law careers, Annice Brown and Keon Eubanks.

Baltimore City Office of the Mayor

  

Today a conversation with Baltimore City Mayor Catherine Pugh. She assumed office 11 months ago, and has undertaken a number of new initiatives in the areas of violence reduction and economic development. Earlier this month, Baltimore submitted a bid along with several cities across the continent to become the home of Amazon's second headquarters. A couple of weeks ago, the mayor and Governor Larry Hogan announced the next phase of the “North Avenue Rising” project, a $27 million dollar effort to improve transit and pedestrian options along North Avenue. Now that the mayor has chosen the members of the Civilian Oversight Taskforce, we'll talk about the status of the Baltimore Police Department's consent decree with the Justice Department; and the mayor's plan to curb violence in the city as the city mourns its 296th homicide this year.  

We'll also talk about the mayor's plan to help the estimated 2,600 people experiencing homelessness in Baltimore. Some advocates for the homeless say that the city isn’t addressing homelessness in a meaningful way. Last week, the mayor said it might cost as much as $350 million to end homelessness in the city. 

Johns Hopkins Center for Diagnostic Excellence

Each year an estimated 12 million Americans get the wrong diagnosis from their doctor--a medical problem is seen as something else, missed entirely or identified late. Most of the diagnostic errors are not about rare diseases, and in about one third of these cases the results of the error are serious, even fatal. Neurologist Dr. David Newman-Toker joins us to talk about the new Johns Hopkins Center for Diagnostic Excellence at the Armstrong Institute for Patient Safety and Quality. They aim to improve how diagnoses are made. Dr. Newman-Toker, who heads the center, also shares actions a patient can take to improve their odds.

Photo courtesy npr.org

On Monday, the office of Special Counsel Robert Mueller announced that former Trump campaign manager Paul Manafort and his longtime business associate, Richard Gates, have been indicted by a federal grand jury on 12 criminal counts that include conspiracy and money laundering.  Manafort and Gates surrendered themselves to FBI officials Monday. The indictment contends that Manafort earned more than $18 million dollars for consulting work for pro-Russian interests, that he hid his wealth in off-shore accounts, and that he spent it on a “lavish lifestyle.”  Manafort and Gates have pleaded not guilty to the charges, but it was also revealed Monday that former Trump campaign advisor George Papadopoulos, who was quietly arrested by the FBI last July, pleaded guilty October 5th to charges related to his efforts to arrange meetings between the Trump campaign and Russian government officials.  

Professor Byron Warnken, who teaches constitutional and criminal law at the University of Baltimore,  joins Tom on the line to examine what the indictments mean and what might follow, as Special Counsel Mueller continues his investigation into connections between Russia and the Trump campaign.

Photo courtesy wikimedia commons

And now a Monday edition of Midday at the Movies, our monthly look at what’s new and notable in Hollywood and throughout the film industry.  Tom's joined in Studio A by our movie maven regulars:  Ann Hornaday is the film critic for the Washington Post, and Jed Dietz is the founding director of the Maryland Film Festival

Today, they consider the sexual assault and rape allegations that have been leveled against legendary Hollywood producer Harvey Weinstein by dozens of women over the past several months:  Has public awareness of Mr. Weinstein's behavior altered the power dynamic for other major Hollywood producers and directors, and has it changed the work climate for the actors and other artists who depend on their favor?   

Then, Ann and Jed spotlight some of the interesting new films on the circuit this fall, including the recent collaboration by Selma director Bradford Young and Grammy Award-winning rap artist Common: two short films: Letter to the Free and Black America Again -- which have been finding audiences around the country and which showcased this past weekend at the Washington West Film Festival.

As suicide rates approach a 30-year high, researchers are working to pinpoint the causes of suicide attempts and, determine how to keep people who are vulnerable to suicide... from access to the most lethal means of completing that act-- firearms. We hear from Dr. Paul Nestadt, psychiatrist and post-doctoral fellow at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. His research compares urban and rural suicide rates in Maryland.

photo courtesy BCPS

Today, a Midday Newsmaker interview with Dr. Sonja Santelises, the president and CEO of the Baltimore City Public Schools.  School has been back in session for two months; for many more months than that, the Kirwan Commission has debated ways to re-vamp the funding formula for schools statewide.  Their findings were to have been released by the end of the year.  Now, it appears that we won’t hear their ideas until well into next year.  We’ll find out what that means for our city’s kids.  Dr. Santelises joins Tom for the hour in Studio A, and takes your questions and comments.

photo by Stephen Spartana

We're delighted to welcome to Midday's Studio A the internationally acclaimed classical musician,   Manuel Barrueco.  A few years ago, Fanfare Magazine called the Cuban-born artist the world’s greatest living classical guitarist, and it’s hard to dispute that encomium.  Three decades' worth of recordings and performances around the globe are the gold standard for legions of aspiring guitar players; for the past 25 years, he has shared his artistry and musical erudition with many of them at the Peabody Institute here in Baltimore.

This weekend, Manuel Barrueco comes to Towson University to open the Baltimore Classical Guitar Society's 30th anniversary season, with a program titled The Spanish Guitar.  The performance begins Saturday evening, October 28th at 8 p.m. in Towson’s Kaplan Hall.  Manuel will perform pieces by Fernando Sor, Granados, and Falla.  For directions and ticketing info, click here.

Walters Art Museum

Though the name sounds foreboding, the Mexican holiday Dia de los Muertos, or Day of the Dead, is in fact a celebration of life. The Walters Art Museum has built a traditional altar, or ofrenda … and has planned several events to bring the holiday to life in Baltimore. We talk with Amanda Kodek, Director of Education, and Alexander Jarman, Manager of Adult and Community Programs, to learn about the activities, and the holiday itself. Creative Alliance also has many Dia de los Muertos activities planned, and you can learn more about them here.

On today's look back at the Stoop, Debra Diamond, Wall Street money manager turned psychic, medium and medical intuitive tells about the day she discovered these extrasensory gifts. You can hear her story and others at StoopStorytelling.com.

PBS Against All Odds

When it comes to daily headlines, the black middle class is nearly invisible. The news tends to focus on dysfunction in poor black neighborhoods, confrontations with police, disappointing achievements in urban schools. There's a lot missing from that narrative. To find out more, we talk with journalist Bob Herbert, who wrote and produced the documentary “Against All Odds: The Fight for a Black Middle Class.” He brings decades of reporting and analysis together to explain what African-American families have confronted in pursuing the American Dream. Please note, the local screening and panel discussion of this event at the Parkway Theater is SOLD OUT.

linkedin.com

Despite relentless efforts by the Republican-led Congress to repeal, replace, kill or cripple Obamacare, the Affordable Care Act remains the law of the land.  But President Trump recently issued executive orders targeting key elements of the program: in particular,  he halted the insurance-company subsidies that help reduce premiums for low income Americans.  Now, just days before the start of the 2018 Open Enrollment Season (November 1-December 15, 2017), a bi-partisan effort is underway in Congress to restore those subsidies, and shore up the nation's troubled insurance marketplace.  But it's not clear when, or if, the measure will come to a vote.

Tom examines what’s ahead for American health care with two astute observers of health care policy and politics:  Julie Rovner is Washington correspondent for Kaiser Health News, an independent, non profit news organization; she joins us from KHN studios in Washington, DC.; and Joseph Antos  is a health policy scholar at the American Enterprise Institute, a conservative research center.  He joins us on the line from the AEI studio in Washington.

Photo by Rosiland Cauthen

It's Thursday, and time for our visit from Midday theater critic J. Wynn Rousuck, who joins us each week with her reviews of thespian offerings from the region's many stages. This week, Judy reviews Yellowman, the award-winning 2002 work by playwright  Dael Orlandersmith, now running at Arena Players.

A finalist for the 2002 Pulitzer Prize Yellowman is a multi-character play -- with just two multi-role actors -- that builds on the memories of an African American woman who dreams of life beyond the confines of her small Southern hometown --and the light-skinned man whose life is intertwined with hers, with an ultimately tragic outcome. 

The play is directed by Rosiland Cauthen, and stars George Oliver Buntin as Eugene Robert Gaines, and Rosey Young as Alma.

The Diamondback

 

Last week, Sean Urbanski, a white former University of Maryland student, was charged with a hate crime in connection to the fatal stabbing of Lt. Richard Collins III, a black Bowie State University student. In May 2017, Lt. Collins was stabbed at a bus stop while visiting friends on the University of Maryland College Park campus. The entire incident was caught on camera. Prosecutors plan to seek life without parole if Urbanski is convicted; the trial is set to begin in January. At the time of the alleged murder, it was reported that Urbanski was the member of an online hate group that posted bigoted messages and memes called “Alt-Reich: Nation.” Authorities say further investigation into Urbanski’s cell phone and social media accounts uncovered evidence that suggested that the stabbing was indeed racially motivated.

Maryland Historical Society

Tom speaks painter David Brewster and Alexandra Deutsch, the Director of Collections and Interpretation at the Maryland Historical Society, about the Society's current exhibition. Structure and Perspective: David Brewster Explores Maryland’s Social Landscape portrays Maryland's "social landscape" by juxtaposing pieces from the Society’s collection with paintings by David Brewster, who hails from Baltimore County but currently lives in Vermont. The show takes up several issues that resonate in contemporary culture like race, gender, sexuality, and the politics of immigration. 

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

In 1932 the U.S. Public Health Service enlisted African-American men in Macon County, Alabama in a syphilis study. The men weren’t asked for informed consent -- and were told they would get treatment. They didn’t, even after penicillin was shown to cure syphilis.

We meet Peter Buxtun, a public health employee who discovered in the 1960s what was happening and bioethicist Nancy Kass, from Johns Hopkins’ Berman Institute, explains how Buxtun’s whistleblower helped shape the rules and regulations surrounding research today.

Peter Buxtun will be speaking at UMBC tomorrow at 4 pm in Lecture Hall 1 in the Biological Sciences Building.

all photos by Wendel Patrick

A boom in new, young residents is great for business, unless you’re the neighborhood funeral home.  In this episode, a funeral director looks toward an uncertain future, a yarn shop becomes a handicraft social hub, a family of Mennonites arrives to start a Christian school, and a record store owner ponders his decision to become… a record store owner.

The Samaritan Women's Facebook Page

For the past decade, survivors of domestic sex trafficking have found refuge at The Samaritan Women, a program in Baltimore that offers long-term housing and therapy.

Founder Jeanne Allert tells us why she was drawn to serve women who’ve experienced such exploitation and about The Samaritan Women’s spiritual focus. And we hear from two survivors - Cici and Alex - who are rebuilding their lives and planning for the future with the help of The Samaritan Women.

Bin 201

This week take the 30,000 foot view of the wine industry over the past 20 years. Tony and Chef Cindy discuss how production and tastes have changed and how those two have interacted with each other. We hear from Dwight Chew of James River Distillery in Richmond Virginia. Chew gives some perspective on how things have changed for the spirits industry. And, of course . . .  a chefs challenge where Cindy has to tackle a pineapple.

Photo courtesy Creative Commons

Baltimore is home to approximately 50,000 small businesses, more than half of which are minority owned.  What do those businesses need to sustain themselves and to grow?  What do entrepreneurs who dream of establishing their own companies need to get started?

A new report prepared by Johns Hopkins University's 21st Century Cities Initiative looks at financing small business in Baltimore.  Today, a conversation with the authors of that report, about how we can help small business flourish, and how we can attract more companies to plant roots in Charm City.

Tom's guests today are former Treasury Department official Mary Miller, now a senior fellow with The 21st Century Cities Initiative; the program's executive director, Ben Seigeland Meridian Management Group president, CEO and co- founder Stanley Tucker, who specializes in financing minority and women owned firms. 

They join us today to talk about bringing the bucks to Baltimore business... 

If the Trump presidency seems to be unfolding like a firehose of tweets and hysterical headlines, stay tuned for two experts who are looking to put it in context. Pulitzer-Prize-winning presidential historian Jon Meacham finds fundamental contrasts between the 45th chief executive and the 41st, the first President Bush.

And political scientist Todd Eberly of St. Mary’s College of Maryland has just co-authored a book titled "The Trump Presidency: Outsider in the Oval Office". Eberly will be speaking at 7:30 pm on November 7 on campus in the Daugherty-Palmer Commons building. 

Iraqi Jewish Archives

During a search for weapons of mass destruction in 2003, it was discovered that Saddam Hussein’s intelligence headquarters held priceless artifacts ... then the building was bombed and burst water pipes and flooded the basement nearly destroying the contents. Marvin Pinkert, the director The Jewish Museum of Maryland, tells the story behind the dramatic rescue of these artifacts, several of which are featured in the museum's latest exhibit, “Discovery and Recovery: Preserving Iraqi Jewish Heritage.” The centuries-old records detail communal life, religious practices and eventual persecution of Jews in Iraq.

Louis Blank tells the story about how even the uninvited guests to his wedding felt special. Don't miss the Stoop’s season kickoff, The Stoop in The Dark: Stories about the Unseen, Unknown, and Untold, Thursday, October 26, 7:00 pm at the The Senator Theatre. You can find information and more stories at stoopstorytelling dot com.

AP Photo

It's another edition of the Midday News Wrap, our Friday discussion of some of the week's top news stories with a panel of journalists and commentators.  Joining Tom Hall on this week's panel: reporter Jenna Johnson, who covered the 2016 Trump Campaign.  Now, she covers the White House for The Washington Post, and she joins Tom on the line from The Post's radio studio.  Also on the panel and with us in Studio A is Pastor Shannon Wright.  She is the Third  Vice-Chair of the Maryland Republican Party and the first Black woman ever elected to any party office in Maryland.  In 2016, she was a Republican candidate for president of the Baltimore City Council.  She is also the co-host of the Wright Way With Shannon and Mike morning show  and a panelist on Roland Martin on News One.

Photo courtesy Liz Simmons

Now, a little music to take us into the weekend.  Low Lily is a vocal and string trio from Vermont whose modern acoustic sound also taps the roots of folk and fiddle music.  They join Tom live in Studio A. 

Low Lily is:  Liz Simmons on guitar.  Flynn Cohen on guitar and mandolin.  And Lissa  Schneckenburger on fiddle.

They’ll be playing at Germano’s Piattini in Little Italy here in Baltimore on Friday night.  Use the link to get details.

The Sixth Branch

Few neighborhood rebuilding groups can claim they’re driven by a military sense of purpose. Today we hear from Rich Moore, founder of The Sixth Branch in Baltimore. He and Scott Goldman, the nonprofit's executive director talk about how the group channels the leadership skills and commitment of military veterans to serve local communities through organizing, building and maintaining projects. Regina Hammond, joins us too, to talk about the lasting impact The Sixth Branch has had on the Johnson Square neighborhood. Find out how you can get involved here.

Photo courtesy The Aspen Institute

In his biographies of Benjamin Franklin, Albert Einstein and Steve Jobs, the historian Walter Isaacson has been drawn to his subjects by their uncanny capacity to make connections across disciplines, combining technical expertise with an artist’s eye for beauty, line and grace.  In his latest opus, Isaacson chronicles perhaps history’s greatest creative genius: the 15th century Italian artist, scientist and inventor, Leonardo Da Vinci.  From The Mona Lisa to The Last Supper, DaVinci's iconic paintings revolutionized how artists observed the world, and in fields as disparate as geology, botany, anatomy and engineering, he made lasting contributions.  Walter Isaacson joins Tom on the line from New York City to talk about the nature of genius, and the rewards of insatiable curiosity.

Photo by Matthew Murphy, 2017

It's Thursday, and that means our peripatetic theater critic, J. Wynn Rousuck, joins Tom in Studio A to review one of the region's many new stage productions.  Today, Judy's talking about the newly-revived traveling production of the Tony-Award-winning The Color Purple: The Musical, whose six-day run at The Hippodrome Theatre in Baltimore continues until this Sunday, October 22.

 

On Saturday, thousands of runners will hit the streets to participate in the Baltimore Running Festival. More than 24,000 runners from all 50 states and 30 nations are expected to descend on the Charm City to run our historic streets. That’s a lot of folks taking a lot of steps, and that leaves a lot of room for twisted ankles, swollen knees and sore backs.  

Dr. Miho Tanaka is an orthopedic surgeon and the Director of the Women’s Sports Medicine Program at Johns Hopkins Hospital. Before moving to Baltimore, she was the team physician for WNBA teams the St. Louis Cardinals and the St. Louis Surge. She also served as assistant team physician for the Baltimore Orioles and professional women’s basketball team, the NY Liberty.

She joins Tom to talk about ways to avoid injuries on race day and beyond.

Dean Shareski / Flickr via Creative Commons

One of the most common learning disabilities - dyslexia - complicates how a child learns to read and write. Because their brains are wired differently, students with dyslexia are at risk of falling behind their peers.

A radio documentary by APM Reports - Hard to Read: How American Schools Fail Kids with Dyslexia -  highlights the challenges dyslexic students in Baltimore County face in getting the services they need. Producer Emily Hanford tells us how the great debate over how to teach reading is leaving kids behind.

And Pamela Guest, an advocate with Decoding Dyslexia - Marylanddescribes the frustration of watching her son struggle to read. Guest is also the editor of IEP Magazine.

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