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The Spanish flu of 1918 led to more than 500,000 deaths in this country. What if a pandemic like that were to hit now? Intensive care units are already frequently strained to capacity. If there were a severe pandemic, there wouldn’t be enough resources to go around, like life-saving ventilators. Whose lives should be saved first? Should it be first come, first serve? Should children get priority? Should we remove a ventilator from an ailing patient if a healthier person has a better chance of surviving? Should we treat healthcare workers first? A team of Maryland doctors has asked the public to weigh in on these thorny ethical decisions. 

"Wallis"

Sep 7, 2016

In the sixth and final installment of the Focus on the Counties series, Tom speaks with Kent County Administrator, Shelley Herman Heller. Kent County is one of nine counties in the state that do not have a county executive, instead administrators are appointed by a board of elected commissioners. Heller was appointed County Administrator in July 2015. She is a Kent County native, and was town administrator of her hometown, Betterton, MD, from 2011 -2014, and then the finance officer for the town before taking on the top job in the county. 

Also joining the conversation is Chris Cerino. He’s the mayor of Chestertown, the largest town in Kent County. As a part-time mayor, Cerino makes an annual salary of $7,500 a year. In his other day job, he is Vice President of the Sultana Education Foundation, a local nonprofit that focuses on the history and ecology of the Chesapeake Bay.

With just 20,000 residents, Kent is Maryland’s smallest county and the population is still declining. Heller and Cerino join to discuss the challenges of serving an aging and shrinking population. 

The Chestertown Riverfest takes place from Sept. 23-24 on the shore of the Chester River. The festival features food, crafts, water sports and other family activities. The festival is presented by Chestertown RiverArts, Washington College Center for Environment and Society and SANDBOX. 

Klintz Photos

Joanne Lewis Margolius is the founder and director of the Magical Experiences Arts Company (MEAC), a Baltimore-based arts organization that for 30 years has been presenting workshops and programs for disabled children, using theater arts to address areas of emotional conflict.   This therapeutic theater group works at places like the Maryland School for the Blind, the Delrey School, which works with children suffering from traumatic brain injuries, and the Copper Ridge Center, which works with adults in the late stages of Alzheimer’s and dementia.  Joanne Lewis Margolius joins Tom in the studio to describe the power of Emotional Stimulation Therapy, MEAC's unique, sensory alternative to traditional drama therapy.

It’s been nearly a month since the U.S. Department of Justice released its report on the Baltimore Police Department. It chronicles years of unconstitutional and discriminatory policing, especially of African-Americans. The report also exposes inadequate training and staffing, and a lack of follow-up after citizens file complaints. Now the city must draft a consent decree detailing plans for reform. We’ll talk to a reporter who’s looked at the effect of federal intervention in police departments in other cities. And we’ll meet the organizers of a town hall, scheduled for tomorrow, who want to know what the public would like to see in its police. What will it take to fix the Baltimore Police Department?

Penn State/Flickr via Creative Commons

Buddha, Jesus, Mohammed. Plato, Socrates, Hippocrates. All of them had at least one thing in common. They fasted. It turns out these influential figures were on to something, at least when it comes to health. Some scientists say that regularly abstaining from food for even short periods of time may improve health, boost brain power, and fight diseases ranging from cancer to diabetes to Alzheimer’s. It could even extend lives. The catch is that you have to periodically put down your fork. Could you permanently say goodbye to breakfast if it meant you might live longer? What about skipping all your meals two days a week? We speak to Mark Mattson, chief of the Laboratory of Neurosciences at the National Institute on Aging, and University of Maryland molecular geneticist Steve Mount, who has been a practitioner for the last 12 years. Original air date: May 18, 2016

Josh Fidler 9/6/16

Sep 6, 2016

Josh Fidler is a respected member of the Maryland business community. He is Co-Chairman of Chesapeake Realty Partners, a diversified real estate development business, and Founding Partner of Boulder Ventures, a venture capital fund active in the Mid-Atlantic and Colorado.

September 6,2016 - Radio Kitchen - What To Do With All That Produce II

Last week we gave you a useful little show chock full of ideas for using all that summer produce that is piling up around us.  And this week we'll do it some more.  And Chef Jerry Pellegrino of Schola Cooking School and I think people are probably a little overwhelmed with all the good things that are out there, courtesy of our great Maryland farmers.

Wikipedia

Here’s a cheery thought to kick off your holiday:  The first two leading causes of death in the United States are heart disease and cancer.  The third leading cause?  Medical errors.  Researchers at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine found that mistakes in prescribing drugs, miscues in surgery, and miscommunication between care givers leads to an astonishing number of preventable deaths every year.  One of the authors of the study, Dr. Michael Daniel, explains how the medical community is addressing this endemic problem. 

Then, 53 years after the Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr.  led the March on Washington, a conversation with an eyewitness to history: pioneering civil rights activist Gloria Richardson, one of the founders of what came to be called The Cambridge Movement on Maryland’s Eastern Shore.

And, local author Kathy Flann on her latest collection of Baltimore-based short stories, Get a Grip.  

Alex Proimos

    

A recent study conducted by Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and published in the health journal, BMJ, found that medical errors in hospitals and healthcare facilities in the U.S. account for 250,000 deaths a year. That’s more than other notorious causes like respiratory disease and stroke.  Researchers say medical errors are not counted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) because of an oversight in the system hospitals use to record causes of death.

Medical errors include things like misdiagnosis, surgical mishaps and accidental prescription overdoses.

According to the study’s co-author, Dr. Michael Daniel, miscommunication between doctors and patients can lead to many fatal medical errors.

Dr. Daniel joined Tom in the studio to discuss the study’s findings and what can be done to address the issue.

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