WYPR Programs | WYPR

WYPR Programs

Oscar Ucho/flickr

A new administration is coming to Washington, D.C., but the current one is not quite done. Recently, the White House released its annual Economic Report of the President. This will of course be the last such volume produced by the Obama administration.

mt 23/flickr

Catherine Collinson shares four essential tips for setting financial goals in 2017.

Start with racism and sexism. Mix in religion, politics, and money. Then add a room full of strangers. That may sound like a dicey recipe for open and honest conversation, but JC Faulk has crafted a thoughtful way to approach these hard subjects. It’s called Circle of Voices. Since January, about 2,000 people from across Baltimore have participated in conversations facilitated by Circles of Voices. Now, JC Faulk has been named one of this year’s Open Society Institute Baltimore’fellows. Like the nine other fellows, he’ll will receive $60,000 over the next 18 months to fund a local project. The nonprofit Open Society Institute focuses on addressing the needs of Baltimore’s underserved communities and supporting innovative solutions to longstanding problems. 

Deborah Ramsey didn’t fit the profile of the typical applicant when she joined the Baltimore Police Department decades ago. She was in her 30s, a mother. Deborah knew she loved Baltimore. her hometown, and that she was a people-person. She approached her police job with these strengths in mind. Working as a patrol officer and later a detective, she saw people in both their worst and best moments, dealing with the sudden death of a family member, or celebrating the return of a missing child. Now Deborah Ramsey has been awarded one of this year’s ten Open Society Institute Baltimore fellowships. Each fellow will receive $60,000 over the next 18 months to fund a local project. The Open Society Institute is a nonprofit that supports efforts to address problems in Baltimore's underserved communities, from mentoring young people to criminal justice reform. 

Painting, poetry, photography, sewing, even songwriting. These are some of the arts activities that Gianna Rodriguez and the organization Baltimore Youth Arts bring to young people across Baltimore.

  

Time for the next installment in our weekly feature from the Stoop Storytelling Series. In 2009, comedian Jim Meyer told the story of an unusual job he once had. Hint: it involves a crown and scepter. You can listen to more stories, and learn about Stoop shows and The Stoop podcast, all at stoopstorytelling.com

Dafne Cholet/flickr

Tony and Chef Cindy remember some of the highlights from 2016. From adventures in France to delicious local white nectarines. They also check in with Robert Brittan of Brittan Vineyards in Oregon to get his perspective on last year’s harvest and what lies ahead for 2017.

census.gov

We are a diverse society, and that emerged as a major point of emphasis in 2016.  There are many ways to measure how diverse a society is, including the share of people in various minority groups. One of the most interesting ways is by looking at people’s last names. According to newly released Census Bureau data, the top 25 last names accounted for 8.7 percent of U.S. population in 2010, not much changed from 2000.

New Years Eve, 1938

Dec 30, 2016
Luis Deliz/flickr

Gil tells us about the last voyage of the Howard W. Jackson ferry boat.

*This conversation originally aired on September 21, 2016.

The "dirtiest man on TV" Mike Rowe joins Tom to talk about rolling up his sleeves and getting down to work in some of the hardest professions on Discovery Channel's Dirty Jobs and later Somebody’s Gotta Do It which aired on CNN from 2014 until May 2016.

These days Mike has turned his focus to closing the skills gap in workforce. The mikeroweWORKS Foundation. Provides scholarships for people who want to learn a high demand skill or trade. Mike says the desire to start the foundation came from meeting thousands of skilled workers who make good livings and are passionate about their careers. Many of the folks Mike shadowed on Dirty Jobs did not have advanced college degrees, he talks about why he's encouraging people to obtain a skill set in a specific vocation and why college isn't always the key to success. 

Pages