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When we think of school segregation, we tend think of that long, dark period in American history, before the landmark Supreme Court Brown vs. Board of Education decision in 1954, that refuted the notion that “separate but equal” schools were constitutional. For decades following the decision, schools became more integrated, opening their doors to students of color voluntarily and through court ordered busing programs. However, in the last 30 years school across the country have moved towards re-segregation.

Maryland has the third most segregated classrooms in the United States behind New York and Illinois. So, what does that mean for the young people we’re educating? 

via Wikimedia Commons

President Trump’s goals for reshaping the U.S. are starting to come into focus. His plans may be altered by the Republican Congress. But it’s not too soon to start assessing what the Trump economic agenda might mean for Maryland. We hear from Darius Irani, vice president of Innovation and Applied Research at Towson University and chief economist for the Regional Economic Studies Institute (RESI), and Anirban Basu, president and CEO of The Sage Policy group.

French Food and Travel

Mar 26, 2017
Petit Louis

On this week's episode of Foreman and Wolf on Food and Wine it's the evolution of French food. Plus, Tony and Chef share a bit about their travels to France. 

Photo by Craig Schwartz

We turn to the world of theater and the premiere of a new musical at the Everyman Theatre here in Baltimore.  Its subject couldn’t be more timely:  Los Otros or, The Othersdelves into the complexities of immigration, cultural identity, sexuality, and coming of age.

In 2012, a very different version of Los Otros was presented at the Mark Taper Forum in Los Angeles.  Vincent Lancisi, the founder and artistic director of the Everyman, commissioned a re-write of the musical after that original production, and then held a workshop in New York so that the writers could make further revisions, which continued as the rehearsal process for the Everyman production got underway.

The man who composed Los Otros' beautiful music and the woman who wrote the lyrics and book join Tom in Studio A.  Composer Michael John LaChiusa is a five-time Tony Award nominee for work on and off-Broadway.  He’s won, among other awards, an Obie, a Dramatists Guild Award, and Daytime Emmys.  Ellen Fitzhugh has received Tony, Emmy and Drama Desk award nominations, and written lyrics with numerous film score composers, including the renowned Henry Mancini.

If Republicans in the US House of Representatives can’t pass their health care bill by Friday afternoon and send it on to the Senate, the President says he’ll walk away, and move on to other items on the Trump agenda.  Has Repeal and Replace morphed into Reveal and Disgrace?

Last October, FBI Director James Comey revealed he was looking into Hillary Clinton's e-mails. He waited until this week to mention that at the same time, he was also looking into allegations about collusion between the Russians and the Trump campaign.   Devin Nunes is the Chair of the House Intelligence Committee. He got to visit the White House this week! And then he said he’s very sorry about it.  Appeals Court Judge Neil Gorsuch has made his pitch to join the Supremes. Chuck Schumer says the Dems will filibuster.  

Dorian Gray shares his true tale of a nerd’s revenge. You can listen to more stories, and learn about Stoop shows and The Stoop podcast, all at stoopstorytelling.com.

Most mental-health care in the U.S. is delivered by social workers, more than psychiatrists and psychologists. As the American Association for Psychoanalysis in Clinical Social Work gathers here this weekend, we talk to two therapists about Baltimore’s special spot in the development of psychoanalysis, the challenges for therapists and residents in a city suffused with trauma, and how that influences the approach social workers take in therapy.

 

Today, a conversation about Historically Black Colleges and Universities. Maryland is home to four of the nation’s more than 100 institutions. Last month, President Trump issued an Executive Order directed at HBCUs after meeting with nearly 100 presidents and leaders of those institutions. Some HBCU students and alumni criticized the meeting, calling it a photo op. Several HBCU presidents who attended say they were given little time to discuss their concerns and talk about strategies to help their institutions succeed. 

Credit Courtesy of the Jewish Museum of Maryland

Six million Jewish lives were lost during World War II and the Holocaust. A new exhibit at the Jewish Museum of Maryland explores the history of the Holocaust through the lens of the town of Auschwitz in Poland. Deborah Cardin, the museum’s deputy director, explains that today the town is known as the location of a massive complex of Nazi concentration camps. But before that, she says, "The town was a place where for hundreds of years, Jewish residents and non-Jewish residents lived side by side beginning in the 16th century." We also hear from Edie Creeger, whose mother survived the Holocaust in Hungary. Together, they, alongside other local survivors, created collages to tell their stories and honor their loved ones.

In 2015, following the uprising sparked by the death of Freddie Gray, there was a big spike in people expressing interest in mentoring. Now two years later has that interest been sustained? Few question the fact that when young people develop a close relationship with a caring adult, those young people do better in school, and they are able to navigate the tricky waters of adolescence much more effectively than their peers who do not have an adult providing a model, and interest in their lives. Kera Ritter is the President of Big Brothers Big Sisters of the Greater Chesapeake, one of several organizations in Maryland connecting young people with mentors.

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