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Johns Hopkins University

*This edition of Midday was shortened to accommodate NPR's special coverage of President Trump's press conference with Israel Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu.

 

Genome editing, that is the ability to make additions, deletions, and alterations to the genome of a human or animal, is not a new. Scientists have been experimenting with it in labs for a while to better understand the way some diseases and disabilities work. But now a new report released yesterday from the National Academy of Sciences and the National Academy of Medicine sets international guidelines for genome editing. New editing tools like CRISPR have opened up the doors for more lab and clinical research projects. The scientists behind the report hope their guidelines will serve as a roadmap to help other scientists avoid the ethical concerns associated with gene editing.

Baltimore’s public markets are an enduring feature. The city had some of the earliest public markets in the United States. After visiting Lexington Market, Ralph Waldo Emerson dubbed it “the gastronomic capital of the world.” But in modern times the city’s markets have struggled with vacancies; and in some, the fare tends toward the fast and fried. Renovations are planned for several of the markets, but the city was dealt a setback last week when the developer charged with renovating Cross Street Market on South Charles Street backed out of the deal after years of negotiations. What does the future hold for Baltimore’s storied public markets? Robert Thomas, executive director of the Baltimore Public Markets Corporation, the non-profit organization that administers the markets, joins us. And Baltimore Business Journal reporter Melody Simmons, who has covered recent developments at both Cross Street and Lexington Markets, also joins us. 

Sanctuary Cities

Feb 15, 2017

Wes explores nationwide struggles over sanctuary city status and the relationship between local police agencies and Immigrations and Customs Enforcement.  What can Baltimore learn from San Francisco, a city that is suing the Trump administration over the issue?

Guests on this episode include:

In today's episode of "More Than Words," Xavier, a Frederick Douglass High School student shares his connection to an issue all too common in Baltimore City--gun violence.

Courtesy of the DANCE IQUAIL! Facebook page

A dance production being staged at Goucher College later this month draws inspiration from the songs of singer and activist Nina Simone. Choreographer Iquail Shaheed, assistant professor and the founder of DANCE IQUAIL!, tells us how “Black Swan,” uses dance and music to shed light on issues of race, identity and isolation in ballet. And Goucher sophomore Jamison Curcio tells us about what the production means to her as a African American dancer.

Office of The Mayor

Today a conversation with Baltimore City Mayor Catherine Pugh. Mayor Pugh took her post in December 2016 after a long career in Maryland politics, first as a Baltimore City Council member and later as a State Delegate, so she is no stranger to Baltimore’s old problems. 

To date, According to the Baltimore Sun, 45 people have been killed in the city this year. What can be done to assure that a homicide a day isn’t the new normal?   When Mayor Pugh was elected she campaigned on a platform that included improving education, now Baltimore City Public Schools may have to layoff 1,000 teachers and cut arts and enrichment programs due to a $130 million budget deficit. What role will the Mayor play in ensuring a quality education for the city's young people? 

In today's episode of "More Than Words," Xavier, a Frederick Douglass High School student shares his connection to an issue all too common in Baltimore City--gun violence.

Slowly but surely, President Trump’s cabinet picks are coming to a vote, despite fierce opposition by Democrats in some cases. One of those cases is the nomination of Scott Pruitt, Oklahoma’s attorney general, to head the Environmental Protection Agency. Early this month Democrats on the Senate committee charged with vetting his nomination boycotted. Republicans suspended committee rules and moved the confirmation on to the full Senate. A vote is likely to come this week. What would Scott Pruitt’s nomination mean for Maryland and the Chesapeake Bay? We hear from Republican Congressman Andy Harris, who represents Maryland’s 1st congressional district, and Eric Schaeffer, executive director of the nonprofit Environmental Integrity Project. He served as director of the EPA’s Office of Civil Enforcement from 1997 to 2002. 

Kira Horvath for Catholic Relief Services

The civil war in Syria has led to one of the worst humanitarian crises since World War II. Since the conflict began six years ago, nearly five million people have fled from Syria to Turkey, Lebanon, Jordan, Egypt and Iraq. More than six million others have been displaced from their homes, but are unable to get out of Syria. A million people have requested asylum in Europe.

The Obama Administration committed to placing 10,000 Syrian refugees in the US in 2016. Last month, President Trump tried to ban all travel to and from Syria indefinitely. That ban was overturned, at least for the moment, by the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals last Thursday night.

Today, a conversation about what is happening on the ground, and what we might be able to do to help the millions of people who are in dire need of humanitarian assistance.

Tom's guests today in Studio A are all deeply involved in the effort to help refugees. Bill O'Keefe is the Vice President for government relations and advocacy at Catholic Relief Services, which is based here in Baltimore. Linda Hartke is the CEO of the Lutheran Immigration and Refugee Service, also based in Baltimore. Bill Frelick is the Director of the Refugee Rights Program at Human Rights Watch in Washington, DC.

The John D. & Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation

David Simon needs no introduction in Baltimore, but a quick reminder for our far-flung listeners: David is an author, writer and producer of the acclaimed TV series about criminal justice in Baltimore, The Wire, and many other projects, including Treme, Show Me a Hero, and the upcoming HBO drama, The Deuce.

He joins Tom today in Studio A to talk about City of Immigrants: A Night of Support, an event that he has  organized in support of immigration and in opposition to the Trump Administration's proposed curbs on refugee admissions and travel from seven Muslim-majority nations. Tonight’s event  at Beth Am Synagogue in Reservoir Hill will include, in addition to remarks by David Simon, the Pulitzer Prize-winning historian Taylor Branch, the activist DeRay Mckesson, City Health Commissioner Dr. Leana Wen and others, with music by singer/songwriter/actor Steve Earle. Proceeds from the event will be donated to The National Immigration Law Center, the Tahirih Justice Center, the International Rescue Committee and the ACLU of Maryland. Donations will be matched up to $100,000 by David Simon’s Blown Deadline Productions.

The event  is sold out.  A small number of additional tickets be made available at 4 pm today.  If you can't get a ticket, don't despair.  The gathering of Baltimoreans "united against fear, nativism and the immigration ban" will be live-streamed on the Washington Post website. Here’s the link.  And, after the event, use the link to watch any time. 

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