WYPR Programs

Midday with Dan Rodricks: Mon. Jul. 27, 12-1 PM
1:31 pm
Mon July 27, 2015

Representative Dutch Ruppersberger

Rep. Dutch Ruppersberger voted to strip federal funding for so called sanctuary cities. He joins Midday to discuss his decision.

 

Last week, the House of Representatives voted to strip federal funding for so-called “sanctuary cities,” such as Baltimore, that shield undocumented immigrants from authorities. In this hour, Rep. Dutch Ruppersberger, of Maryland’s 2nd Congressional district, explains why he voted against the bill. We’ll also hear what he has to say about President Obama’s nuclear agreement with Iran, and the hack of the US Office of Personnel Management, which is said to have compromised the privacy of more than 20 million Americans. Also on the agenda: genetically modified foods, Baltimore’s recovery, Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan’s decision to kill the Red Line, and the 2016 presidential race.

 

Maryland Morning Podcast
12:00 pm
Mon July 27, 2015

Black Churches In 2015; Faith Inclusive Congregations; Thoroughly Modern Millie; Food Waste

Credit The All-Nite Images // Flickr Creative Commons

Churches historically have played a leadership role in the black community. We talk about how faith groups in Baltimore are engaging in the digital and decentralized ‘black lives matter’ movement.

Then, Tom Hall talks to Rabbi Daniel Cotzin Burg from Beth Am Congregation and the Reverend Andrew Foster Connors from Brown Memorial Church about what they’re doing to make their congregations more inclusive.

Plus, Tom and theater critic J. Wynn Rousuck discuss the Jazz Age musical "Thoroughly Modern Millie," at Cockpit in Court Theater of the Community College of Baltimore County.

And, we talk to two grad students who just won a prize for their proposal that Baltimore make healthy produce more accessible by setting up a market that would charge cheap prices for food otherwise headed for the landfill.

Maryland Morning
9:00 am
Mon July 27, 2015

Black Churches In Baltimore and #blacklivesmatter

Credit The All-Nite Images // Flickr Creative Commons

Churches in the black community historically have been a vital institution -- a central force of social change. From Martin Luther King Jr. , to the Reverends Fred Shuttlesworth, Richard Boone and Pauli Murray – myriad church leaders helped birth the modern civil rights movements.

Fast forward to 2015 in Baltimore: On the day of Freddie Gray’s funeral and the night of the unrest, scores of black clergy walked down North Avenue to quell the unrest.  And it raises the question: as the Black Lives Matter movement has grown --a decentralized group of community leaders, activists, authors, journalists and students using digital tools like Twitter--how has the black faith community in Baltimore engaged with this growing group?

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The Morning Economic Report
8:53 am
Mon July 27, 2015

Shrinking U.S. Budget Deficit - 7/27/15

The U.S. budget deficit shrank by 52 billion dollars, or fourteen percent during the first nine months of the twenty fifteen fiscal year versus one year ago figures according to the Congressional Budget Office.  Due a combination of a strengthening economy and public policy, tax receipts have been expanding faster than spending increases. 

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Maryland Morning
8:50 am
Mon July 27, 2015

Local Congregations Gain Attendance By Being Faith Inclusive

Credit Wally Gobetz // Flickr Creative Commons

Living Questions is our monthly series in which we examine the role of religion in the public sphere. This series is produced in partnership with the Institute for Christian and Jewish Studies. Today, Tom has a conversation about inclusiveness in faith congregations. What does it mean for a place of worship to be open and welcoming? Tom and his guests examine that not just from a theological perspective, but also, in light of the murders at a church in Charleston this year, or at a mosque in Wisconsin a few years ago. What are the tensions that faith institutions face between openness and basic security in their buildings.

Our guests this morning are the dynamic leaders of two congregations in Baltimore who have increased their membership since their tenures began. Rabbi Daniel Cotzin Burg has been the Rabbi at Beth Am Congregation in Reservoir Hill since 2010. Reverend Andrew Foster Connors is the Senior Pastor at Brown Memorial Park Avenue Presbyterian Church, a position he has held for the past 11 years. He is also the co-chair of BUILD, Baltimoreans United in Leadership Development. 

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