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Your Maryland

"Diamond Jim"

Dec 7, 2017

In the early years of the 20th century, "Diamond Jim" Brady was a man of enormous appetites, for food, entertainment, and, of course, diamonds. 

 

"The Orator"

Nov 16, 2017

Though one of America's greatest orators of the time, Edward Everett, gave a grand speech at the dedication of the cemetery at Gettysburg, it was Abraham Lincoln's brief address, consisting of only 272 words, that will forever be remembered. 

"The Last Man"

Nov 8, 2017

On November 11, 1918, Henry Gunther, a young soldier from East Baltimore with German heritage, was the last man to die in "The War to End All Wars." 

"War Admiral"

Nov 3, 2017

In 1938, an eager crowd at Pimlico Race Course witnessed an epic race between War Admiral, the 1937 Triple Crown Winner, and a little upstart horse named Sea Biscuit. 

Accusations of witchcraft arrive in the Maryland colony along with English settlers. 

Accusations of witchcraft arrive in the Maryland colony along with English settlers. 

"Joe Gans"

Oct 18, 2017

In 1902, Joe Gans, a black boxer from Baltimore, became Lightweight Champion of the World. 

"Hound Dog"

Oct 12, 2017

The story behind the hit song and its tie to Baltimore. 

Abolitionist "Captain" John Brown made quite an impression on Frederick Douglass when they met, but, while bound by the same passion, 

the two men went on to fight to end slavery by very different means. 

"Christiana"

Sep 21, 2017

In 1851, Maryland farmer Edward Gorsuch formed a posse and tried to retrieve some runaway slaves that had fled over the Pennsylvania border. It did not end well. 

"The Defenders"

Sep 14, 2017

In September, 1814, Baltimore and Fort McHenry withstand bombardment from the British. 

On August 24, 1814, Joshua Barney and his troops fought the British at Bladensburg as they made their way to sack and burn Washington. 

In late summer, 1897, using "unorthodox methods" and "inside baseball," the scrappy Baltimore Orioles battled the more refined Boston Bean Eaters for the National League pennant. 

In August, 1776, 400 Marylander s of the “Dandy 5th” Regiment fought bravely to hold the American line in Brooklyn Heights, New York, while George Washington and his troops beat a hasty retreat after a disastrous encounter with the British. 

"Despot's Heel"

Aug 17, 2017

The look at the daily lives of the young Union soldiers who occupied various forts around Baltimore during the Civil War. 

"Halsted"

Aug 9, 2017

Between the 1880s and the 1920s, Dr. William S. Halsted and his students revolutionized the practice of medicine at Johns Hopkins hospital. 

"Good Deeds"

Aug 3, 2017

On July 3, 1863, Confederate officer Henry Kyd Douglas was wounded just south of Gettysburg and becomes first a patient and then a prisoner of Union troops and their allies. 

On July 24, 1868, a massive storm caused terrible flooding along the Patapsco River Valley, including the mill town of Ellicott City. 

Bonus March

Jul 20, 2017

In June, 1932, as the Depression wore  on, thousands of WWI veterans marched on Washington, DC, demanding a bonus payment promised to them in 1926 but not to be paid until 1945. 

"Gilmor's Raid"

Jul 13, 2017

In July, 1864, Major Harry Gilmor and his Confederate Calvary

 wrought havoc, burned bridges, and robbed trains north of Baltimore as the Confederate Army tried to gain ground in Maryland. 

After meeting at the Battle of Monacacy and surviving the Civil War, Union General Lew Wallace and Confederate General Jubal Early went on to influence popular culture, albeit in rather different ways. 

"King Kong"

Jun 29, 2017

A little known story behind the scenes of the making of the movie "King Kong" and its ties to Marlyand. 

"Front Royal"

Jun 22, 2017

On May 23, 1862, 1st Maryland Federal troops met and fought Confederate soldiers, also from Maryland, under the command of Stonewall Jackson at Front Royal. 

"The Mermaid"

Jun 14, 2017

In the Spring of 1778, during the war of Independence, 

the HMS Mermaid surrendered to residents of a small town along the Maryland coast rather than be taken as a prize of the French sailors chasing him.  

Politics and newspaper publishing prove a potent mix in the early 19th century in Baltimore. 

Captain John Smith's  exploration and exploits in the Chesapeake region. 

"Color Guard"

May 24, 2017

In 1864, black men from Baltimore and surrounding areas, both free and enslaved, volunteered to fight for the Union Army as soldiers of the 4th U.S. Colored Infantry. 

In the late 19th century, horse racing enthusiasts worked to bring world class horses and high stakes races to Baltimore. 

In 1816, a series of volcanic eruptions resulted in bizarre weather all over the world, with freezing temperatures, snow, and sleet, and catastrophic consequences. 

In May, 1861, in the wake of the Pratt Street Riots, Chief Justice Roger B. Taney issued a writ of habeas corpus for John Merryman, who had been imprisoned at Fort McHenry for his actions preventing the movement of Federal troops into Maryland. The decision became known as "Ex Parte Merryman," and was upheld by the Supreme Court in 1866. 

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