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Metro

Baltimore County's school board bemoaned the loss of Superintendent Dr. Dallas Dance at its regularly scheduled meeting Tuesday night. Dance abruptly resigned earlier that day. WYPR's Jonna McKone covered the meeting, and told Nathan Sterner some of what happened.

John Lee

Baltimore County School Superintendent Dallas Dance resigned unexpectedly Tuesday, leaving the county school board scrambling for a replacement. Dance said in a statement it was time for him to "transition to another chapter of my career."

Courtesy: Diageo

Near the end of its 90-day session, the General Assembly signed off on the liquor license changes Guinness needs to open a tap room and brewery in Baltimore County. But the Irish brewer plans to go back to lawmakers to ask for more. 

MD Manual

U.S. District Judge James Bredar approved Friday a police reform agreement negotiated between Baltimore City and the U.S. Justice Department, despite Trump administration requests to hold off on that approval.

Bredar’s ruling came only a day after an hours-long hearing in which Justice Department lawyers asked for a 30-day delay to re-evaluate the agreement finalized in the last days of the Obama administration. 

Mary Rose Madden

After months of negotiations, Baltimore police and the U.S. Justice Department reached an agreement on a roadmap to police reform. But now, Justice Department lawyers have asked a federal judge to wait 90 days before finalizing that map.

John Lee

When Glenn Elseroad drives you around his 500 acre farm in Western Baltimore County, the first thing he shows you are the 7,000 trees he’s planted. Then there are the cover crops planted in the winter.

Dulaney High bucks renovation and AC plans

Mar 8, 2017
John Lee

The Baltimore County School Board rejected last night plans to renovate Dulaney High School in Timonium after parents argued to wait for a new school. And that could put in jeopardy County Executive Kevin Kamenetz’s plan to have all county schools air conditioned in the next couple of years.

Diageo North America

Guinness’s plan to build a brewery and taproom in Southwest  Baltimore County cleared its first hurdle in the General Assembly Monday.

For a local bill to have a prayer, it has to get voted out of its local delegation. Guinness’s bill for some exemptions in state liquor laws did that, breezing through Baltimore County’s Senate delegation 6-0; but not without some changes.

“Pay-to-Play” tanks in the legislature

Mar 7, 2017

Developers in Baltimore County will be able to continue contributing to the campaigns of county candidates after all.

A proposed ban on that kind of contribution died Monday in Annapolis at the hands of Baltimore County lawmakers.

State Senator Jim Brochin’s so-called “pay-to-play” bill could not get enough support to get voted out of the county’s Senate delegation. So Brochin says that means it’s dead.

John Lee

You don’t need a weather man to know that we haven’t gotten much snow this year. But despite that, Baltimore County has spent much of the money it set aside for snow removal. And here’s why.

John Lee

More than 23,000 families in Baltimore County are on a waiting list for housing vouchers once known as Section 8. And while they're waiting, the long running debate over where to put affordable housing in the   county rolls on.

Joel McCord and John Lee, of the WYPR news team, discuss a measure making its way through the General Assembly that would keep landlords from automatically turning down renters with housing vouchers.

John Lee

Plans to put a Guinness brewery in Baltimore County will fall flat unless the Maryland General Assembly takes action. It’s all about how much beer Guinness would be allowed to pour.

Flickr-Creative Commons

Baltimore County’s eight-member state senate delegation met today in what’s called the Red Room at the State House. And they heard from county residents who were seeing red over the influence developers have in the county. The residents were there to back legislation that would ban the county executive and council members from taking money from developers.

Baltimore County

Maryland’s General Assembly returns to Annapolis Wednesday, and Baltimore County lawmakers are arriving with a wish list.

Any legislator you talk to will tell you numero uno for Baltimore County in this session is money for schools. Same goes for County Executive Kevin Kamenetz. He plans to have all county schools air conditioned in a couple of years and wants more state money to help with that.

Fraser Smith and John Lee, of the WYPR reporting team, talk about the upcoming review of Baltimore County's charter and what that could mean for county residents.

John Lee

Michelle Eubank and Wayne Warble were making the rounds one recent Sunday, taking care of the dozens, if not hundreds, of feral cats that inhabit the old Bethlehem Steel property at Sparrows Point.

They poured food and water into dishes and placed them at four sites with names that harken back to the old days, when Sparrows Point was home to the largest steel mill in the world.

Searching for black Republicans in Baltimore

Nov 8, 2016
Taylor Haire

It’s no secret that Baltimore is a heavily Democratic, and majority black, city. And it’s no secret that African Americans have been the Democrats’ strongest voting block for decades. But that doesn’t mean there aren’t Republicans who are black out there, running for office in Baltimore.

Maryland goes to the polls

Nov 8, 2016
Jonna McKone

Marylanders flooded polling places Tuesday as one of the nastiest and most divisive elections in recent memory came to a close. There were long lines at many polling places and glitches here and there, some of them related to Maryland’s return to paper ballots. Scanners broke down in several places and in other precincts, voters waited in long lines to put their ballots through a single scanner. 

Maryland Voices: Out of the polls

Nov 4, 2016
P. Kenneth Burns

What do most Baltimore City voters fear as they cast their ballots?  That Donald Trump will be elected the next president of these United States of America…North America.

Rumble over roads in Baltimore County

Nov 1, 2016
Baltimore County

Getting roads fixed is a bread and butter job for a county councilman. But one Baltimore County Councilman says he is being kept in the dark about road projects in his district by County Executive Kevin Kamenetz’s administration.

flickr.com/dougtone

Just in time for Halloween, the ghost of the Red Line appeared as Baltimore County officials gave the state their wish list of transportation projects.

This comes as state transportation officials boast of a record number of road construction projects under way throughout Maryland, even if they do cause traffic jams.

Youtube

If you go around asking people who they plan to vote for, for president this year, you will find many are passionate about their choices. And that choice often has a lot to do with not liking the other candidate.

Take Liz Freedman, who lives in Reisterstown and plans to vote for Hillary Clinton.

"I could never vote for Donald Trump," Freedman said. "He is a misogynist."

Then there is Ed Aldridge, who lives in Essex.

"Trump all the way," he said. "Hillary will run the country into the ground."

Scholars sing to start the day at Play On Purpose's Summer Camp
Jonna McKone

Every parent faces challenges finding constructive opportunities for their children in the summer while school’s out. But that process can be even more difficult for parents who can’t afford day camps.  

On a hot, August morning, about 75 kids play, sing and chat in the cafeteria of ConneXions, a public charter school in the Mondawmin neighborhood of West Baltimore. Play on Purpose (POP) runs a free summer program here that includes curriculum through the Freedom School, a program of the Children’s Defense Fund. Freedom Schools teach culturally relevant reading and local African American history at over 12,000 sites around the nation to, in part, stem the tide of summer learning loss.

In the aftermath of the storm

Aug 1, 2016
P. Kenneth Burns

Torrential storms pushed swollen streams over their banks in the Baltimore region over the weekend, causing two deaths and major damage in Ellicott City and tearing up businesses in the Woodberry section of Baltimore.

Early Monday the clean-up efforts were well underway as trucks with heavy equipment and police cruisers streamed down Ellicott Mills Drive onto Ellicott City’s historic Main Street, each vehicle followed by a cloud of dirt.

Blue Water Baltimore

Baltimore City asked the U.S. District Court last month to extend its deadline for making critical improvements to the city sewer system by 17 years, from January 2016 to the year 2033.

The deadline stems from a 2002 lawsuit the U.S. Department of Justice filed against the city for allowing raw sewage to leak into public waterways, in violation of the federal Clean Water Act.

SRB’s image problem

Apr 20, 2016

  The upheaval that followed the death of Freddie Gray in April 2015 had an undeniable effect on the political career of Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake. 

Just as she was getting ready for a re-election campaign against her predecessor, she decided to leave public office.  She will have been in Baltimore city government for 21 years when her term ends in December.

But Rawlings-Blake was already facing challenges before the unrest.

Audits at the center of City Comptroller’s race

Apr 20, 2016

Joan Pratt, Baltimore City’s Comptroller since 1995, is facing her first challenger in 17 years. He’s Mike King, a Northeast Baltimore resident with a background in financial operations, and he says Pratt hasn’t done enough to audit city agencies.

Mayor’s Race: Mosby Drops Out, Pugh Drops In

Apr 20, 2016

Hours before Councilman Nick Mosby shook up the race for mayor by dropping out, the frontrunner pulled a surprise of her own.

State Senator Catherine Pugh had begged off from a debate Wednesday on WYPR’s Maryland Morning with fellow candidates Elizabeth Embry and Councilman Carl Stokes, citing a scheduling conflict. Then about 15 minutes into the program Pugh showed up, surprising the candidates and host Tom Hall.

State lawmakers appear to have reached an agreement on a bill changing the controversial Law Enforcement Officers’ Bill of Rights. 

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