WYPR | Your NPR News Station

Legislators focus on youths' role in Baltimore violence

Reporter Rachel Baye and Nathan Sterner discuss record levels of violence in Baltimore — what’s causing it and how it can be stopped.

WYPR News

Rachel Baye

By Monday, the State Board of Education must submit a plan to the U.S. Department of Education outlining how Maryland’s schools will abide by the Every Student Succeeds Act, the successor to No Child Left Behind. The federal law governs how states monitor schools’ performance.

Maryland’s plan will be submitted without Gov. Larry Hogan’s signature.

Visions: Sandtown Mural & Art Project

Host Nathan Sterner talks to City Hall Reporter Dominique Maria Bonessi about the Justice Department not finding sufficient evidence in federal criminal charges on the six Baltimore City police officers involved in Freddie Gray Jr.'s death on April 19, 2015. State's Attorney Marilyn Mosby, the NAACP, and Maryland Democratic Congressmen all weigh in giving their reactions.


Karen Hosler

Annapolis’ pre-Labor Day parade had the usual marching bands, dance troupes and city council members waving from antique convertibles. Then there was this guy strutting, skipping, and dancing down West Street, moving from side to side to shake a hand or grab a hug.

Just as he stole the show that day, Australia-born Gavin Buckley has injected the race for Annapolis mayor with a spark rarely seen in city elections.

"I feel like I have a passion to take the city forward and effect some change," Buckley said. "Not just talk about it."

Buckley, 54, is an entrepreneur credited with driving a nest of drug dealers and prostitutes from a main Annapolis thoroughfare.

AP Photo/Rob Carr

On April 20, 1996, the date of that year’s collegiate draft, the Baltimore Ravens tapped two men who would forge their places in league history.

Jonathan Ogden established himself as one of the best left tackles in league history, while Ray Lewis is seen in some circles as the greatest middle linebacker the NFL has ever produced.

Lewis and Ogden were teammates and Super Bowl champions, each taken in the first round of the draft, 22 picks apart.

Dominique Maria Bonessi

Host Nathan Sterner talks to City Hall Reporter Dominique Maria Bonessi about legislation to provide a $2500 property tax credit to public safety officers that reside in Baltimore City. Council President Jack Young and District 11 Councilman Eric Costello proposed the bill as incentive for more public safety officers to reside within Baltimore City lines. Currently 23 percent of police officers, 30 percent of firefighters, and 53 percent of sheriffs reside in the city. 

More News

WYPR Presents Humorist David Sedaris

Thursday, October 12 @ 7 pm, The Hippodrome

Travel to Cuba with WYPR

Join WYPR Radio and fellow jazz lovers for a culturally-rich musical journey to Cuba!

Out of the Blocks

all photos by Wendel Patrick

2400 Saint Paul St, Part 2

In this episode, portraits of irrepressible drive and determination: A self-made cosmetics mogul opens up a school of makeup artistry, a local fashion entrepreneur delivers a searing sociopolitical critique, a hair stylist runs a one-man business and wears his heart on his sleeve, and a sanitation worker trades in his drug-dealing past for a career cleaning the streets.

Read More

More Than Words

Jonna McKone

Episode #7: Creativity As A Form Of Activism

For our final More Than Words story, Xavier started out interested in how activists in Baltimore see their work in the city as connected to and inspired by Civil Rights struggles of the past. As he researched and conducted interviews for this piece, he found writing to be an overlooked form of activism and decided to sit down with one of his favorite authors, D. Watkins.

Read More

Maryland expects 360,000 newly insured residents by 2020. Will it be hard for them - and harder for you - to see a primary care physician? Today on The Checkup, we ask whether Maryland is going to experience a primary care shortage, and what Southern Maryland is doing to keep the shortage it already has from getting worse.

The latest on the ongoing partial shutdown of the federal government: most civilian military workers are back at work, thousands of furloughed workers file for unemployment benefits, a delay on the groundbreaking of the Harbor Point development, and much more.

The tens of thousands of Maryland federal government workers who’ve been furloughed during the government’s partial shutdown will likely get their back pay, under legislation approved by the House of Representatives on Saturday. Plus: the BDC violates MD’s Open Meetings Act, Poe House reopens, and more.

Speaking in Maryland about the partial federal government shutdown, President Obama said “the longer this goes on, the worse it will be.” More on the shutdown’s effects, plus: flu arrives in MD, two more guilty pleas in the prison corruption case, and Baltimore police plan a cell phone checkpoint.

President Obama will address the impact of the federal government shutdown on businesses in an appearance in Rockville. More on the impact of the shutdown on MD, plus: online health exchanges struggle amid high volume, gun sales surge, and more.

Tom Clancy, the best-selling writer of such "techno-thrillers" as The Hunt for Red October, Red Storm Rising and Patriot Games, has died.

He was 66.

The partial shutdown of the federal government enters a second day – affecting tens of thousands of Maryland workers. Plus: an attempt to block the implementation of MD’s new gun law is denied, police enforce a new ban on hand-held cell phone use while driving, and more.

Credit: Kurhan / stock.xchng

The federal government is closed today, but the Maryland Health Connection is open. It's the state's new online marketplace for consumers to comparison-shop and buy their own health insurance. We talk with Rebecca Pearce, executive director of the marketplace, as well as with executives of two of Maryland's health insurers about what consumers should expect.

Maryland’s economy will feel the impact of the partial federal government shutdown; some 10 percent of MD’s civilian workforce is employed by the government. More on the shutdown, plus: a look at the health insurance exchanges opening enrollment today, and the new MD laws taking effect.

With a partial shutdown of the federal government looming, the 300-thousand federal workers who live in MD wait to see if they’ll be furloughed. MD’s new gun law kicks in tomorrow, so does a law making use of a hand-held cell phone while driving a primary offense. Plus: Vacants to Value, casino funds, and more.

Pages