Andrea Appleton | WYPR

Andrea Appleton

Producer, Midday

Andrea Appleton

Andrea Appleton is a producer for Midday. She comes to WYPR with years of experience as a freelance journalist filing stories for newspapers, magazines, and public radio. She has reported on topics ranging from bull riding to bionic fish, with an emphasis on science.  She is also former senior editor of the Baltimore City Paper, and a graduate of the Columbia University School of Journalism.

She and her husband live in Baltimore with their two young sons.

Jason Mrachina / Flickr via Creative Commons

Thirteen dead bald eagles were found on the Eastern Shore last weekend. Wildlife advocates are offering a $25,000 reward for information. Yet there is no shortage of bald eagles in the region. Our national bird was once endangered, but there are now more bald eagles on the Chesapeake Bay than there have been since Colonial times. Today we talk with eagle expert Bryan Watts and legendary Virginia conservationist Mitchell Byrd. The pair will fly out over the lower Chesapeake Bay in a prop plane next week, with a former fighter pilot who calls himself Captain Fuzzzo at the helm. It is the three-man team's 25th year scouting for nests together.

Courtesy of Frederick Douglass Family Initiatives

Frederick Douglass was an escaped slave, a gifted author and orator, and a champion of emancipation and civil rights. But here’s something you may not know: he was passionate about photography. In fact, Frederick Douglass was the 19th century’s most photographed man. Why was a man who devoted his life to ending slavery and racism so in love with photography? A new book called “Picturing Frederick Douglass” explores that question. We’ll talk with John Stauffer, who co-authored the book. And we’ll meet Kenneth Morris, Jr., a Frederick Douglass descendant who is himself a modern-day abolitionist. Morris grew up surrounded by some of the 160 photos featured in the book.

Lucélia Ribeiro / Flickr via Creative Commons

 

Kik. Whisper. Yik Yak. Social media apps like these help teens and tweens connect in a digital world. Social media can broaden horizons, and help young people develop social skills. But the Internet has a darker side, especially for kids. The anonymity of the online experience allows easy access for sexual predators and cyberbullies. Plus, a frivolous social media post can live online … and damage future job and college prospects. How can parents stay informed about an ever-changing Internet landscape? How can they help their kids safely navigate that landscape? Adam Rosenberg and Drew Fidler of the Baltimore Child Abuse Center discuss the perils of the Internet for teens and tweens, and share tips for parents.

Imagine you had to call into work every morning to find out if you were on the schedule. How would you arrange child-care? What if you were juggling a second job? Or what if you arrived at work only to find you weren’t needed? This is reality for many low-wage part-time employees. Maryland is one of at least ten states considering legislation to make scheduling more predictable. But employers say a one-size-fits-all mandate will place an unnecessary burden on businesses. Economics and labor-employment relations researcher Lonnie Golden joins us to discuss so-called just-in-time scheduling. We’ll also hear from Mike O’Halloran, Maryland State Director of the National Federation of Independent Business.

Photo courtesy of candidate website

Today we welcome Deray Mckessoncontinuing our conversations with Baltimore’s 2016 mayoral candidates. The Black Lives Matter activist and former school administrator entered the Democratic primary minutes before the filing deadline. We’ll discuss the changes in policing and education Mckesson is calling for, and take your questions.

But first: Controversy at a Catholic university in western Maryland. Mount St. Mary’s student newspaper recently revealed a  plan to improve retention rates by weeding out struggling freshmen. Two faculty members critical of the plan were fired...and then reinstated. The faculty is calling for the president’s resignation. Scott Jaschik, founder of Inside Higher Ed, brings us the latest.

Right now, nearly 4,000 Marylanders are waiting for an organ donation. Some will die waiting. Who should be first in line? What obligation do family members have to become living donors? Should it be legal to buy an organ? How can we be certain donors are giving their organs for the right reasons?

Kenneth Burns / WYPR

A sea change is coming to the Baltimore City Council: Nearly half the members are not seeking reelection this year. Three of the 15 are retiring, two are vacating their seats to run for mayor, and another is pursuing a judgeship. Luke Broadwater of The Baltimore Sun and WYPR news analyst Fraser Smith join us to discuss the implications.

Todd Huffman/Flickr via Creative Commons

Baltimore City’s Police Department fielded 799 citizen complaints against police officers last year. Most were dismissed, and the civilian and the officer never met face-to-face. Soon they’ll have that chance. The city is launching a voluntary mediation program.

Johnathan Nightingale/Flickr via Creative Commons

Maryland’s Eastern Shore has a lot of chickens...and enough chicken manure to fill M&T Bank Stadium twice every year. That manure is a major Chesapeake Bay pollutant. Last summer Governor Hogan enacted a regulation that restricts how much chicken litter farmers can spread on fields. Now advocates are supporting legislation that would place the burden of disposing of that extra manure on poultry companies, taking farmers and taxpayers out of the equation.

Eduardo Perez / U.S. Customs and Border Protection

A flood, a surge, an influx. In 2014, headline writers struggled to convey the massive number of Central American children crossing the border into the United States. Those headlines have faded, but the kids are still coming. In fact, we are likely on the cusp of a new, equally large wave of unaccompanied minors from El Salvador, Guatemala, and Honduras. As in the previous surge, many of these children are coming to Maryland.

Pages