Gil Sandler | WYPR

Gil Sandler

Host, Baltimore Stories

Gil Sandler was born and raised in Baltimore -- a circumstance he considers fortunate and one he does not want you to forget. He attended public school (P.S. #59, Garrison Junior High, Baltimore City College, Class of 1941) and then served in the United States Navy.
Returning, he completed his college education at the University of Pennsylvania (Class of 1949). In 1967 he earned his Master's Degree in Liberal Arts from the Johns Hopkins University. He began to write features for the Sunday Sun and a weekly column ("Baltimore Glimpses") for The Evening Sun. "Baltimore Glimpses" would continue for 31 years. He is the author of six books (Johns Hopkins University Press): The Neighborhood, Baltimore Glimpses Revisited, Jewish Baltimore, Small Town Baltimore, Wartime Baltimore, Glimpses of Jewish Baltimore.
He has received numerous awards for his writing and lecturing, including the Emmert Award for Feature Writing for The Sunday Sun and election to Hall of Fame of his alma mater, Baltimore City College.
Asked how long he thinks, he can continue telling “Baltimore Stories,” he replies, "I'm just getting started." Gil Sandler's Baltimore Stories is made possible in part by

The Diplomats

2 hours ago
JD Hancock

In the early afternoon of August 23, 1963, three African American diplomats, dressed in full and colorful diplomatic attire, entered Miller Brothers restaurant at Fayette and Hanover Streets—in those days, strictly segregated. They introduced themselves as representatives of the Republic of Gabon. But they were not. Who were they? They ordered lunch, enjoyed it, and left—and made history. The story…

Death of an Arabber

Oct 13, 2017
Andrew Hazlett/flickr

On July 23, 2017, four horse-and-wagons formed a funeral cortege at the entrance to the Wylie Funeral Home at 701 Mt. Street. Crowds had gathered to say goodbye to Eugene Allen, among the last of Baltimore’s street Arabbers, who with their memorable yells, sold fruits and vegetables off of their horse and wagons. We may have lost Mr. Allen but, cherishing horse and wagon selling in Baltimore, we have his yells.

Arabber calls (originally aired in 1989) provided by All Things Considered.

HK Elevators

Oct 6, 2017
Steve Snodgrass/flickr

Click on the image for the audio.   

On a Saturday afternoon in 1946, on an elevator in the popular downtown department store, Hochschild Kohn, a uniformed elevator operator was calling out to passengers, “Fourth  floor, Ladies dresses, special sale today!” An elevator operator selling merchandise while calling out floors? So beloved was this custom that when the store installed automatic elevators, they had to call the operators back. To call out floors and merchandise!

Weather at the Fair

Sep 30, 2017

Click on the image for the audio.  

Gil tells us about the people who made sure the Baltimore City Fair went on without a hitch. 

Palughi

Sep 22, 2017
Dano/flickr

On June 22, 1972, Tropical Storm Agnes hit. The Jones Falls overflowed. Standing at the interception of Northern Parkway and the Falls, watching with painful dismay, was Mayor William Donald Schaefer. With him was Marco “Buddy” Palughi. Well known for getting the mayor what he needed. What he needed at this moment were rowboats, to start a salvage operation. True to his reputation, in the middle of it all, Pelughi delivered the rowboats.

Ellis Lane Larkins

Sep 15, 2017

Thursday, December 12, 1935: In an auditorium of Frederick Douglass high school, then all African American, a crowd was gathered to celebrate the eleventh anniversary of the Baltimore Urban League. The keynote address was given by America's first lady, Mrs. Eleanor Roosevelt, who then introduced an 11 year-old boy named Ellis Lane Larkins, who then played a piano concert, a waltz by Moszkowski...

At the end of a long summer’s day in 2003, a young Shannon Mullaney was driving home along the Jones Falls Expressway, looking forward to dinner. When—Screech! Accident! She got out of her car to meet the driver of the other car. Minutes later they found themselves at the bar next to one another at a tavern off of Exit 10. They got married. And then divorced. She said she lost the guy but still had the story. So do we.

Blue Laws

Aug 31, 2017
Victor/flickr

On a Sunday afternoon in 1937, a policemen stationed outside of a Max’s Delicatessen on University Parkway stopped a customer and demanded to see the purchases. To the customer’s dismay, the officer found—contraband! A corned beef on rye with mustard. Max was arrested. He had violated Baltimore’s Blue Laws, which  effectively shut the town down on Sunday. The Laws are gone but the stories about them are not!

Poetry and Parkway

Aug 25, 2017
Alessandro Bonvini/flickr

Up into the 1970s, Baltimoreans could tune in on their radios to station WCAO at midnight and listen to—poetry! It was an hour of readings, to the accompaniment soft organ music, originating from the Parkway Theater on North Avenue.

“The last reading of the last night of the poetry hour read here comes a time to say the song is through.”

And for Baltimore’s first lat and only poetry hour it was.

Exodus and Johnny Pica

Aug 18, 2017

On the moonless night of February 9, 1947. A shadowy melodrama was being played out on the Lancaster street dock and aboard the ship moored to it. Boys were to be seen loading the ship and with munitions. They were boys from Little Italy and from the Jewish Community Center—recruited off the basketball court of the Jewish Community Center together, at work, not realizing it, founding a country.

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