J. Wynn Rousuck

Maryland Morning Theater Critic

J. Wynn Rousuck has been reviewing theater for Maryland Morning with Sheilah Kast since 2007. Prior to that, she was the theater critic of The Baltimore Sun, where she reviewed more than 3,000 plays over the course of 23 years. Her feature coverage for The Sun included a comprehensive series chronicling the development of the Tony Award-winning musical, “Hairspray.” Judy got her start at The Cleveland Press and at Cleveland’s fine arts radio station, WCLV. Her broadcasting experience also includes a year as an on-air theater critic for Maryland Public Television.

A member of the Artistic Advisory Committee of Young Audiences of Maryland, Judy is also a freelance teacher for the Johns Hopkins Center for Talented Youth and the Hippodrome Foundation, Inc. (the Hippodrome’s non-profit partner, which focuses on education and outreach). She was a faculty member at the Eugene O’Neill Theater Center’s Critics Institute in Waterford, CT, for two decades; she is a former National Endowment for Humanities Journalism Fellow; and she was a visiting student at Brown University (2007-2008), under the mentorship of Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright, Paula Vogel. Judy and her husband, Alan Fink, share their home with two dogs, who enjoy hearing their “Master’s Voice” on WYPR.

The Rousuck Review: "Kinky Boots"

Oct 2, 2015
Matthew Murphy


Kinky Boots” won six Tony Awards, including best musical in 2013. Now this Broadway musical -- script by Harvey Fierstein, score by Cyndi Lauper -- has opened the season at the Hippodrome. Based on a movie that was in turn based on a true story, "Kinky Boots" is about a dying British shoe factory that saves itself by making stiletto-heeled boots for drag queens. Theater critic J. Wynn Rousuck and Tom Hall discuss whether you’ll get a kick out of “Kinky Boots.”


Richard Anderson

Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice has spawned a zombie novel, a murder mystery,and even a Bollywood movie. Now Center Stage has mounted a brand new stage version. Will our own Jane Austen fan, Maryland Morning theater critic J. Wynn Rousuck, take pride in this latest adaptation?

Stan Barouh


Designer Timothy R. Mackabee’s set for “An Inspector Calls,” is so inviting, you’ll wish you were a guest in this elegant dining room.

But then you notice that some things about this dining room are a bit off. In Everyman Theatre’s smart, stylish production, the room sits on a platform, disconnected from its surroundings. And the fleur de lis designs on the wallpaper are oddly oversized and covered in thick Plexiglas.

The action, set in 1912, begins normally enough in this British play by J. B. Priestley. The Birlings, an upper middle class Yorkshire family, are celebrating daughter Sheila’s engagement to aristocratic Gerald Croft. They couldn’t be happier. Then the doorbell rings. 

Matthew Murphy

Anniversaries and plays by female playwrights will be celebrated during the upcoming 2015-2016 Baltimore theater season and J. Wynn Rousuck is in the studio with Tom to talk all about it. The Vagabond Players and Everyman Theatre both have milestone anniversaries. Washington’s large-scale celebration of women playwrights will reach stages in this area as well, among them: Single Carrot Theatre, the Interrobang Theatre Company, the Strand Theater Company, Rep Stage and Olney Theatre Center.

Women will also be well represented at Center Stage, which is producing an all-female “As You Like It,” two thought-provoking new plays by women, “X’s and O’s” and “Detroit ’67,” and the musical, “The Secret Garden.” Musicals in the Hippodrome’s new line-up will include the recent Broadway hits, “Kinky Boots” and “Motown The Musical.” And, Cohesion Theatre Company, in partnership with Iron Crow Theatre, will present the Trans* Voices Workshop Series.

Tessa Sollway Blische

Lisa D’Amour calls her 2010 play, Detroit. But she herself has acknowledged that the play is set “in a suburb of what could be any middle American city.”

That is, any middle American city beset with severe financial woes, unemployment, abandoned housing and increasingly desperate members of what was once middle America’s middle class.

That’s the backdrop for this Pulitzer Prize finalist, a play that’s been staged from Chicago to New York to London. Now Fells Point Corner Theatre has produced the play’s well-acted, well-directed Baltimore premiere.