John Racanelli | WYPR

John Racanelli

Host, A Blue View

As chief executive officer, John Racanelli leads a team of 600 full and part-time employees and 1,000 volunteers in pursuing the National Aquarium’s mission to inspire conservation of the world’s aquatic treasures.  More than 1.5 million people annually visit the Aquarium’s venue in Baltimore, Maryland, while millions more are touched by the Aquarium’s education programs, outreach activities, social media campaigns and conservation initiatives.

A passionate advocate for the ocean, John strives to drive conservation action worldwide, ensure the success of one of the nation’s leading aquarium enterprises, and fundamentally change the way the world views the ocean and aquatic systems.

John joined the National Aquarium in July 2011 after 10 years as president of Racanelli Partners, Inc. The San Francisco-based consulting firm served the needs of nonprofit leaders nationally and globally, focusing on cultural and conservation organizations including Mission Blue/Sylvia Earle Alliance, the International Union for the Conservation of Nature and the Surfrider Foundation.

After co-founding Mission Blue with author and oceanographer Dr. Sylvia Earle, John assisted her in developing and launching Google Ocean, Google’s most significant enhancement of Google Earth, the most popular earth visualization tool in existence.

Prior to founding his firm, John spent 16 years in leadership positions at U.S. aquariums. He was the first CEO of the Florida Aquarium in Tampa, where he built the facility, team and vision for Tampa Bay’s leading cultural attraction.  He also served for nine years on the leadership team of the world-renowned Monterey Bay Aquarium as its vice president of marketing and development, joining the aquarium a year before its opening. While in college, John began his career as a diver and aquarist, an experience that he credits with giving him great appreciation for the work of everyone on the aquarium team.

Fluent in Spanish, John holds a degree in strategic management from Dominican University of California. He is a SCUBA diver, open-water swimmer, sailor and surfer. His weekly radio show and podcast on WYPR public radio, “A Blue View,” explores important issues related to the aquatic world. John and his family are proud residents of Canton, Baltimore’s historic waterfront district.

WWW.CHESAPEAKEBAY.NET

Many Chesapeake Bay locals have felt the sting of a sea nettle at least once in their life; it’s sometimes an unfortunate consequence of the activities we enjoy on our waterways.

aqua.org

    

When Captain John Smith first explored the Patapsco River in 1608, it was ringed by natural wetlands that provided habitat to native wildlife and filtered the water. It may be hard to imagine, but before Baltimore became a thriving seaport, the Inner Harbor was likely vibrantly colored with a plethora of lush green vegetation resting on the water’s surface.

aqua.org

There's no better word to describe the electric eel than, well, shocking. Part of that shock, as it turns out, was the discovery that it isn't a real eel at all. While it exhibits a long, smooth, snake-like body, the electric eel is scientifically classified as a knifefish, a cousin to the carp and catfish-only with maximum voltage.

aqua.org

When most of us think of volcanoes, we think of mountains, rising and looming over flat plateaus. Cone-shaped and spewing burning ash and molten rock in flows of hot orange-red rock. Washington State's St. Helen's and Italy's Mount Vesuvius are famous volcanic explosions. 


wikipedia.com

What animals do you think exhibit the most kaleidoscopic variety of colors and patterns, in the wildest diversity of forms in the animal kingdom? Tropical birds? Rainforest frogs?

baltimorewaterfront.com

Walk along the Jones Falls near Pier 6 in Baltimore's Inner Harbor and you're bound to notice an unusual contraption floating in the water. Called the Water Wheel, it's a strange combination of old and new technology that has been collecting and disposing of the Inner Harbor's trash and debris since May 2014. 

aqua.org

Don’t be deceived by the desolate look of a mudflat. These areas of mud or sandy mud, which line thousands of miles of Chesapeake Bay shoreline, are hiding a rich variety of life.

semesteratsea.org

The largest turtle on Earth is the leatherback sea turtle, with a shell that’s up to 8 feet wide and a weight of more than 2,000 pounds. Sound big? Well, it is—until someone mentions Archelon, an ancient genus of monster turtles that once lived in a shallow sea covering what’s now South Dakota. Extinct for 80 million years, Archelon turtles made the leatherback look like, well, a shrimp.  

zmescience.com

Cascading tendrils of blue-green tentacles and a translucent, neon bell give the Portuguese man-of-war its otherworldly appearance.

aqua.org

The Greenland ice sheet is melting. Global temperatures are increasing. Sea level is rising. We've known this for awhile. So what's news? It's the pace of these changes.

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