Maureen Harvie | WYPR

Maureen Harvie

Producer, On The Record

Maureen Harvie is a producer for On The Record. She began her career at WYPR as an intern for the newsroom, where she covered issues ranging from medical marijuana to off-shore wind energy.  

She also photographed events around the city, such as Baltimore's Kinetic Sculpture Race, and created slideshows for the newsroom's website.

She is fan of politics, podcasts, and pop culture.  Maureen Harvie is a graduate of the University of Maryland, Baltimore County, and she studied radio production at Howard Community College.

Get Out for Earth Day 2017

Apr 19, 2017
barnyz / Flickr via Creative Commons

Three days before Earth Day 2017 we look at several efforts to build momentum for a healthy environment. Up first, Carl Simon, interim director of the environmental watchdog group “Blue Water Baltimore,” tells us about a host of activities for Earth Day, from down-and-dirty trash removal to fledgling trees and flowers for planting. 

Imagine being a teenager faced with a devastating choice - either be drafted into the army of the country trying to gain control of your home or flee. For Dawit Gebremichael Habte, the only choice was to escape. Eventually, he resettled in the Maryland and focused his efforts on his education - attending Johns Hopkins University - with the goal of returning to help those he left behind. He shares his story in the new memoir, Gratitude in Low Voices.

Time now for another Stoop story, this time from Jim Karantonis, a psychiatric technician stationed at an army hospital during the Vietnam War. He describes an unusual game of baseball. 

Baltimore Heritage

Lions, demons, and devilish fiends--all can be spotted on Baltimore Heritage's gargoyle-themed walking tour of Downtown Baltimore. We hear from Executive Director Johns Hopkins about the nonprofit’s offerings, from tours of LGBT history sites in Mt. Vernon to a biking tour of delis and bakeries in East Baltimore--no spandex allowed! For more information about tours, click here. To suggest a tour, click here to contact Baltimore Heritage.

Johns Hopkins professor of psychiatry and mood disorders Kay Redfield Jamison, acclaimed author of An Unquiet Mind, trains her expertise on one of the most acclaimed poets of the 20th century in her new book Robert Lowell: Setting the River on Fire. We discuss how Lowell’s manic-depressive disease influenced his writing, the importance of his strength of character, and how common mania is among the creative.

Time now for another Stoop story. This week we hear a story from Mark Lowry about growing up in Baltimore’s Charles Village. You can listen to more stories, and learn about Stoop shows and The Stoop podcast, all at stoopstorytelling.com.

Rawlings Conservatory and Botanic Gardens

Tis the season for soil testing, buying seeds, and starting plants indoors. As the date of last frost approaches, we get advice on planning and prepping your garden from Erin Mellenthin, Master Gardener Coordinator for the University of Maryland Extension in Baltimore City, and Kate Blom, supervisor of the Rawlings Conservatory. 

For individuals with autism and their families, the transition from adolescence to adulthood can be uncertain, with concerns about work, housing, medical care, and more. We speak to advocate Pam Beck and her son, Brandon, as well as Keily Law, research director of the Interactive Autism Network, about supporting young people with autism as they journey into adulthood.

Last month, the Harriet Tubman Underground Railroad Visitor Center opened to the public in Dorchester County, on a 17-acre park. The center illustrates Tubman’s life and her work as a liberator. We speak to Chris Elcock, a senior associate at the Baltimore firm GWWO, Inc. Architects. He tells us how the center's design references Tubman's courage and the history of slavery in Maryland. Plus, historian Tony Cohen, founder of The Menare Foundation, describes what escape on the Underground Railroad was like.

Ben Hamburger

A MICA pop-up exhibit titled “Facing Change: Portraits and Narratives of the Shifting Cultural Landscape in East Baltimore” explores the consequences of urban development on a community. Artist Ben Hamburger’s portraits and audio narratives of East Baltimore residents offer different perspectives on development and the meaning of home. Check out more of Ben's work here.

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