Maureen Harvie | WYPR

Maureen Harvie

Producer, On The Record

Maureen Harvie is a producer for On The Record. She began her career at WYPR as an intern for the newsroom, where she covered issues ranging from medical marijuana to off-shore wind energy.  

She also photographed events around the city, such as Baltimore's Kinetic Sculpture Race, and created slideshows for the newsroom's website.

She is fan of politics, podcasts, and pop culture.  Maureen Harvie is a graduate of the University of Maryland, Baltimore County, and she studied radio production at Howard Community College.

Thomas Hawk / Flickr via Creative Commons

Under President Trump, the U.S. Justice Department announced it will pursue tougher criminal charges and tighter adherence to mandatory minimum sentences than during the Obama years. We listen back to a conversation recorded this summer with retired federal Judge Alexander Williams Jr., about the life sentence he was required to impose in a drug case in Prince George’s County -- and with the man he sentenced, Evans Ray Jr., now free on clemency from President Obama. This program originally aired on June 26, 2017.

Click here for more information about the Judge Alexander Williams, Jr. Center for Education, Justice and Ethics at the University of Maryland.

Alex Ionno / Flickr via Creative Commons

Each week several dozen people in Maryland die from opioid use. Last summer, Nicki Neirman, a nursing staff coordinator, lost her fiance to a heroin overdose. She tells us of his episodes of treatment, and how his addiction disrupted their lives.

MICA

Digital, analog. One player, multi-player. Humans love games. We may not realize how much a part of our lives they are, and how much Baltimore is a hub for creating games. Jonathan Moriarty, chair of a non-profit for developers, tells us about Baltimore’s booming game industry, and what supports it. MICA has a game designer-in-residence. This year it’s Lishan AZ, who blends real life and digital in a project that explores the life of journalist Ida B. Wells. And the head of MICA’s game-design program, Jason Corace, tells us how play builds empathy.

“...It is not if we will experience darkness in a life well lived. It is when.” So writes Dr. Robert Wicks, a psychologist who helps caregivers deal with secondary stress. His new book is “Night Call: Embracing Compassion and Hope in a Troubled World”. We discuss his approach to building resiliency.

Cocaine in your cough drops, tobacco in your toothpaste. Internist Dr. Lydia Kang tells us about mystifying medical practices of yesteryear. Her new book is, “Quackery: A Brief History of the Worst Ways to Cure Everything”.

Here’s a Stoop Story from Kate Hanlon, about her younger sister, their loving mother, and a Nike sweatshirt. You can hear this story and many others at stoopstorytelling.com, as well as the Stoop podcast.

The next live Stoop show is November 16th at 8 pm the Creative Alliance. The theme is, "My Freaky Family". Tickets available here.

Whether it is gathering dust in a drawer or worn every day, nearly every one owns jewelry. And real or fake, this form of ornamentation has a story to tell. Shane Prada, director of the Baltimore Jewelry Center, tells us about a new exhibition, Radical Jewelry Makeover: Baltimore, that takes cast-off pieces and gives them new life. And Artist Mary Fissell describes the appeal of jewelry making.

Radical Jewelry Makeover: Baltimore is on display at the Baltimore Jewelry Center until February 4.

Bruno Fazenda / Flickr via Creative Commons

More than 4,600 children in Maryland live in out-of-home placements such as foster care, and studies show that LGBT youth tend to be overrepresented in the foster system.

Judith Schagrin is the assistant director for children’s services for Baltimore County. She gives us an overview of the training potential foster parents undergo. And we hear from former foster youth who identify as LGBT.

Did their sexual orientation affect their experiences? Did they feel prepared when they left foster care? How does Baltimore County ensure foster parents stand by ALL children?

Here’s a stoop story from Joe Sugarman about becoming a father for the second time … and how he and his wife followed their birth plan a little too by-the-book. You can hear his story and others at StoopStorytelling.com

Scout out talented students at HBCUs, prepare them for the rigors of law school, mentor them throughout their careers. The Fannie Angelos Program for Academic Excellence aims to boost diversity in the legal profession.

We hear from the co-founders, University of Baltimore law professors Michael Higginbotham and Michael Meyerson, and we meet two graduates at the start of their law careers, Annice Brown and Keon Eubanks.

As suicide rates approach a 30-year high, researchers are working to pinpoint the causes of suicide attempts and, determine how to keep people who are vulnerable to suicide... from access to the most lethal means of completing that act-- firearms. We hear from Dr. Paul Nestadt, psychiatrist and post-doctoral fellow at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. His research compares urban and rural suicide rates in Maryland.

The Samaritan Women's Facebook Page

For the past decade, survivors of domestic sex trafficking have found refuge at The Samaritan Women, a program in Baltimore that offers long-term housing and therapy.

Founder Jeanne Allert tells us why she was drawn to serve women who’ve experienced such exploitation and about The Samaritan Women’s spiritual focus. And we hear from two survivors - Cici and Alex - who are rebuilding their lives and planning for the future with the help of The Samaritan Women.

If the Trump presidency seems to be unfolding like a firehose of tweets and hysterical headlines, stay tuned for two experts who are looking to put it in context. Pulitzer-Prize-winning presidential historian Jon Meacham finds fundamental contrasts between the 45th chief executive and the 41st, the first President Bush.

And political scientist Todd Eberly of St. Mary’s College of Maryland has just co-authored a book titled "The Trump Presidency: Outsider in the Oval Office". Eberly will be speaking at 7:30 pm on November 7 on campus in the Daugherty-Palmer Commons building. 

Dean Shareski / Flickr via Creative Commons

One of the most common learning disabilities - dyslexia - complicates how a child learns to read and write. Because their brains are wired differently, students with dyslexia are at risk of falling behind their peers.

A radio documentary by APM Reports - Hard to Read: How American Schools Fail Kids with Dyslexia -  highlights the challenges dyslexic students in Baltimore County face in getting the services they need. Producer Emily Hanford tells us how the great debate over how to teach reading is leaving kids behind.

And Pamela Guest, an advocate with Decoding Dyslexia - Marylanddescribes the frustration of watching her son struggle to read. Guest is also the editor of IEP Magazine.

After a devastating fire in March 2016, The Book Thing--a free book depot--is back! Founder Russell Wattenberg tells us about the path to rebuilding and how the community stepped up.

The Station North Tool Library Facebook page

Not-so handy around tools? No worries: the Station North Tool Library has tools and classes for every level of workshop experience. Co-founder Piper Watson tells about the 3,000 tools the library has on offer and the wide variety of its members. The first-ever Fix It Fair is October 21st from 11 am - 3 pm at 417 E Oliver St.

Wikimedia Commons

Five hundred years ago this month, the German monk Martin Luther challenged the practices of the Roman Catholic church, sparking the Protestant Reformation and shaping how Christians think and worship.

Bishop Denis Madden, of the Catholic Archdiocese of Baltimore, and Rev. Mark Hanson, of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America, describe the dialogue aimed at reuniting their denominations.

And we speak to Yu Na Han, who curated an exhibit at the Walters Art Museum about Luther’s life as father, friend, and husband.

Macmillan Publishers

Having a successful African-American physician as a father and a white mother who read her the works of Black authors was no barrier against the racism Julie Lythcott-Haims faced growing up in white Wisconsin. In her new book, "Real American: A Memoir", she describes her journey to self-acceptance and insight about what it means to be Black in America.

Julie Lythcott-Haims will be speaking at the Enoch Pratt Free Library, tomorrow at 6:30 pm. Her “opening act,” will be Mohammad Tall, Youth Poet Laureate at Morgan State University, reading from his work.

Simon & Schuster

Ever wonder what your favorite authors wrote as kids? Author and creative-writing teacher Elissa Brent Weissman has collected their early writings in a new book titled, "Our Story Begins: Your Favorite Authors and Illustrators Share Fun, Inspiring, and Occasionally Ridiculous Things They Wrote and Drew as Kids".

Weissman and several other local authors, will discuss their new books on Saturday, 11 a.m. at the Barnes & Nobel in Ellicott City.

This Thursday at 4 pm, Gordon Korman, author of the Swindle series, Schooled, Ungifted, and the Everest series, will be speaking at The Children's Bookstore in Roland Park.

Jen Pauliukonis / Marylanders to Prevent Gun Violence

"No more numbers. Say their names": that’s the motto of a new campaign by the nonprofit Marylanders to Prevent Gun Violence.

Behind the Statistics aims to build a personal connection through portraits and essays between the public and those devastated by gun violence. We speak to Jen Pauliukonis, president of the coalition, and Cynthia "KeKe" Collins, a member of Mothers of Murdered Sons and Daughters, whose 22-year-old son was killed in a shooting.

Then: University of Baltimore law professor Michael Meyerson describes the legal challenge facing Maryland’s assault-style weapons ban.

UMBC

One-on-one coaching, identifying students’ strengths and weaknesses, providing extra time to review skills. These are some of the tactics that Lakeland Elementary Middle School is employing, with help from University of Maryland-Baltimore County, to boost students’ math skills. We hear about this partnership from Lakeland Principal Najib Jammal, math teacher Katie Poist, and the assistant director of the UMBC Sherman STEM Teacher Scholars, Joshua Michael.

It’s been just over a year since David Cameron resigned from the British government, after six years as UK prime minister, and a decision by British voters to leave the European Union -- the Brexit vote, a shock to many. David Cameron will be in Baltimore this week for the Baltimore Speakers Series presented by Stevenson University.

Scott Mosher / Flickr via Creative Commons

Maryland has taken the EPA to court for failing to require power plants in five nearby states to control the air pollution they emit. Smog caused by these power plants is harmful to both public health and waterways. We discuss the lawsuit with Alison Prost, Maryland executive director for the nonprofit Chesapeake Bay Foundation

Howard County Public School System

In January, Howard County unveiled a building unlike any other in the state. The brand new Wilde Lake Middle School is Maryland’s first net-zero energy school: over the course of a year, it produces as much energy as it uses. The Director of School Construction for Howard County Public School System, Scott Washington, tells us about the school’s solar and geothermal systems and how its design anticipates energy usage.

Check out these videos of the school's construction.

Reading Partners Baltimore Facebook page

For five years the nonprofit ‘Reading Partners’ has collaborated with low-income schools in Baltimore, pairing students who struggle to read with a community volunteer. This week those Reading Partners are back in schools, aiming to serve 900 students with the aid of 1100 tutors.

Today we’ll hear from executive director Jeffrey Zwillenberg about the project’s curriculum, and from returning volunteer Robin Kessler. Plus, Principal Najib Jammal of Lakeland Elementary Middle School describes how the benefits of one-on-one coaching extend beyond literacy.

Here’s a Stoop Story from Jeremy Stern, about love, comic books, and the adventures of “Adequate Man.” You can hear his story and many others at stoopstorytelling.com.

The Women's Center at UMBC

The world of comic books is filled with feats of bravery and alien invaders. The most visible superheroes in pop culture--Superman, Spiderman, Batman--are all white men. But these days readers want heroes and villains who resemble themselves, so writers feature a more diverse set of characters. Comic-book enthusiast Prachi Kochar tells us about the stories that make her feel included--such as comics about the character Hawkeye, who like Prachi, is deaf. Read Prachi's blog post about comic books here.

For more comic book fun, check out Baltimore ComicCon, this weekend at the convention center. Click here for more information.

The Declaration of Independence lists the pursuit of happiness as one of our inalienable rights. But is happiness equally available to everyone in America? Our public debate about economic policy seldom looks at that.

We speak with Carol Graham, of the Brookings Institution and the University of Maryland School of Public Policy. Professor Graham has looked at research linking income inequality with well-being to show that the widening gap in prosperity is creating a parallel gap in people’s hopes and aspirations. Her new book’s title is a question: “Happiness for All?”

Carol Graham will be speaking tonight at the JHU Barnes and Noble at St. Paul and 33rd Streets at 7 pm. The event is free and open to the public. You can RSVP here.

BARCS Animal Shelter Facebook Page

For an individual with a visual impairment, a service animal can mean mobility, as well as independence. We hear from two volunteers with Guiding Eyes for the Blind - Gemma Carter, who is raising her second service dog, and volunteer coordinator Cindy Lou Altman. Altman’s guide dog Jada has been a major boost to her confidence. Click here for more information about the Baltimore Museum of Industry's working animals event on Sunday, September 24th.

Tidewater Muse / Flickr via Creative Commons

The murder and rape of a young woman in Baltimore in 1987 led to the wrongful convictions of two men. Each served more than two decades behind bars, and when DNA belatedly showed they had not sexually assaulted her, both faced the same choice: accept an Alford plea--a type of guilty plea--and be released, or maintain their innocence.

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