Maureen Harvie | WYPR

Maureen Harvie

Producer, On The Record

Maureen Harvie is a producer for On The Record. She began her career at WYPR as an intern for the newsroom, where she covered issues ranging from medical marijuana to off-shore wind energy.  

She also photographed events around the city, such as Baltimore's Kinetic Sculpture Race, and created slideshows for the newsroom's website.

She is fan of politics, podcasts, and pop culture.  Maureen Harvie is a graduate of the University of Maryland, Baltimore County, and she studied radio production at Howard Community College.

Courtesy B'More Clubhouse website

For Tanya Phillips, mental illness made it hard for her to work or to be around others. Then she connected with B’More Clubhouse, a community that focused on her strengths, not her diagnosis. We speak with Tanya, and B’More Clubhouse executive director Jason Woody, about the work the non-profit does to support individuals with mental illness by  allowing them to check their diagnosis at the door, and instead concentrate on building community and developing skills. 

David Cook / Flickr via Creative Commons

From the shape of the nests birds build to the color of their feathers, technology is turning theories dating back to Darwin on their head. Biologist Jordan Price, of St Mary’s College of Maryland, has mapped the genes of both ancient and more recently derived bird species. He tells us why domed bird nests evolved into the widespread bowl shape, why the color of feathers might be more about camouflage than attraction, and what scientists got wrong when studying the differences between female and male birds.

A safe space to sleep can be lifesaving for infants, but families who are low-income, homeless, or transient may turn to unsafe alternatives - like sharing a bed or using the couch. We hear from Shantell Roberts, who has made it her mission to educate parents about safe-sleeping practices and developed a small, portable option. She is also founder of the nonprofit Touching Young Lives. Plus, Traci Kodeck, president and CEO of the nonprofit HealthCare Access Maryland, tells us about how they connect low-income mothers to services.

When Gov. Hogan declared the surge in heroin and other opioid deaths “a state of emergency,” he put Clay Stamp in charge of the fight. Clay Stamp is senior emergency management adviser to the governor and director of the Opioid Operational Command Center. He tells us what resources have been mobilized by the state of emergency and the prospects for making addiction treatment more available. Check out BeforeIt'sTooLate for information and resources related to the opioid overdose crisis.

JARC Baltimore / Facebook

Elaine Carroll tells On the Record about a job-training program she directs in Baltimore’s Park Heights neighborhood - the Jane Addams Resource Corporation, JARC. She describes the obstacles trainees face and how JARC Baltimore prepares low-income folks for careers in modern manufacturing.

@madeinbmorepopup / Instagram

In the response to the growing market for locally-made goods, Baltimore City's Department of Planning will now provide qualifying business with a "Made in Baltimore" certification. Coordinator Andy Cook tells us what value the city thinks this label will add to products. Plus we speak to Jamyla Bennu, co-founder of the hair- and skin-care brand, Oyin Homemade.

Governor Hogan's Facebook page

A day after Governor Hogan vetoed the Democrats’ approach to drawing congressional districts, we ask Len Lazarick, editor of Maryland Reporter, to recap how the system works, and the pressures to change it. Boundaries drawn after the 2010 Census helped Democrats gain a seat in Congress, and now a lawsuit challenges whether that round of redistricting violated the U.S. constitution. Plus, we ask Tufts professor Moon Duchin, how geometry can challenge gerrymandered districts.

For nearly four decades BJ Leiderman’s melodies have graced the public airwaves, accompanying radio programs such as Marketplace, Morning Edition and Wait, Wait, Don't Tell Me! We speak to him about how he got his start, his fear of success, and his debut album, just out, titled BJ.

When Stephen Morgan showed up in 1969, guitar in hand, to be a camp counselor at what is now The Arc-Baltimore, people with intellectual and developmental disabilities often lived in institutions, seldom on their own. Children with mental disabilities were not entitled to free, appropriate public education. Morgan has been head of The Arc Baltimore for three decades, and has witnessed big changes. Ahead of his retirement next month, we talk about what kinds of jobs make sense for people disabilities, what prompts businesses to hire them and what police need to understand about them.

Judy Centers, named for late wife of Maryland Congressman Steny Hoyer, provide early childhood education and family support services at Title I schools across Maryland. We speak to Crystal Francis, coordinator for Baltimore City’s Judy Centers, about how the centers connect families to community resources, such as GED prep and utility assistance. And parent Keisha Thornton talks about the educational value of Judy Centers.

Pages