Maureen Harvie | WYPR

Maureen Harvie

Producer, On The Record

Maureen Harvie is a producer for On The Record. She began her career at WYPR as an intern for the newsroom, where she covered issues ranging from medical marijuana to off-shore wind energy.  

She also photographed events around the city, such as Baltimore's Kinetic Sculpture Race, and created slideshows for the newsroom's website.

She is fan of politics, podcasts, and pop culture.  Maureen Harvie is a graduate of the University of Maryland, Baltimore County, and she studied radio production at Howard Community College.

The Declaration of Independence lists the pursuit of happiness as one of our inalienable rights. But is happiness equally available to everyone in America? Our public debate about economic policy seldom looks at that.

We speak with Carol Graham, of the Brookings Institution and the University of Maryland School of Public Policy. Professor Graham has looked at research linking income inequality with well-being to show that the widening gap in prosperity is creating a parallel gap in people’s hopes and aspirations. Her new book’s title is a question: “Happiness for All?”

Carol Graham will be speaking tonight at the JHU Barnes and Noble at St. Paul and 33rd Streets at 7 pm. The event is free and open to the public. You can RSVP here.

BARCS Animal Shelter Facebook Page

For an individual with a visual impairment, a service animal can mean mobility, as well as independence. We hear from two volunteers with Guiding Eyes for the Blind - Gemma Carter, who is raising her second service dog, and volunteer coordinator Cindy Lou Altman. Altman’s guide dog Jada has been a major boost to her confidence. Click here for more information about the Baltimore Museum of Industry's working animals event on Sunday, September 24th.

Tidewater Muse / Flickr via Creative Commons

The murder and rape of a young woman in Baltimore in 1987 led to the wrongful convictions of two men. Each served more than two decades behind bars, and when DNA belatedly showed they had not sexually assaulted her, both faced the same choice: accept an Alford plea--a type of guilty plea--and be released, or maintain their innocence.

Molly Adams / Flickr via Creative Commons

President Trump’s decision to end DACA, his predecessor’s order protecting from deportation young people who were brought to the U.S. as children, has been met with legal challenges from several states. Maryland has joined one of these challenges; Attorney General Brian Frosh tells us what’s behind that suit. Plus, how are DACA recipients coping with President Trump’s decision? We hear from Baltimore City Public School teacher Jose Torres, and from Heymi Elvir-Maldonado, who came to the U.S. when she was eight-years-old.

DC-Maryland Justice for Our Neighbors will be holding a free informational legal clinic for current DACA holders on September 16th at Salem Hispanic United Methodist Church, 3405 Gough St., Baltimore, MD 21224. The event begins at 10 am. You must call 240-825-4424 to make an appointment to attend. More information available at their Facebook page.

Laura Smith-Velazquez, an astronaut candidate for the Mars One program, tells her story about achieving her dream of working in the aerospace field. You can hear her story and others at stoopstorytelling.com

Whether it’s repairing defects, growing tissue, or customizing cell patterns, new technology is boosting the potential of regenerative medicine. We speak to Professor John P. Fisher, chair of the University of Maryland Fischell Department of Bioengineering, about the school’s new Center for Engineering Complex Tissue.

MD Department of Health and Mental Hygiene

As opioid overdoses continue to surge, the top prosecutor in St. Mary’s County is taking a new get-tough approach: second-degree murder indictments when drug dealing leads to an overdose. We talk with State’s Attorney Richard Fritz, who argues that people who distribute lethal drugs show such disregard for life, they should pay a high price, and University of Maryland Law professor Renee Hutchins, who contends it’s often an addict, not the dealer who packaged the drugs, who gets caught.

Chesapeake Bay Program / Flickr via Creative Commons

Millions of tons of sediment are trapped behind the Conowingo Dam. It can’t hold more, so Governor Hogan has called for a test of dredging some of the sediment. Secretary of the Environment Ben Grumbles explains how the state plans to work with Chesapeake watershed partners --and Exelon which operates the dam--to pay for the project, while finding new uses for the sediment. 

Baltimore City Office of Civil Rights and Wage Enforcement Facebook page

One of the criticisms of last year’s US Department of Justice investigation into the Baltimore Police Department - the city’s Civilian Review Board was severely hampered by a lack of both resources and cooperation from the department. Jill Carter, director of Baltimore’s Office of Civil Rights & Wage Enforcement and former state delegate, tells us how things have changed. And Bridal Pearson, civilian chair of the Civilian Review Board and representative for the Northern District, explains how the board investigates complaints.

A new exhibition at the Baltimore Museum of Art, “From Digital to Damask”, weaves together technology, fish fossils, and 17th-century portraits! Inspired by sewing circles in her native Netherlands, Annet Couwenberg creates art with a fresh take on form and fabric.

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