Maureen Harvie | WYPR

Maureen Harvie

Producer, On The Record

Maureen Harvie is a producer for On The Record. She began her career at WYPR as an intern for the newsroom, where she covered issues ranging from medical marijuana to off-shore wind energy.  

She also photographed events around the city, such as Baltimore's Kinetic Sculpture Race, and created slideshows for the newsroom's website.

She is fan of politics, podcasts, and pop culture.  Maureen Harvie is a graduate of the University of Maryland, Baltimore County, and she studied radio production at Howard Community College.

Dorian Gray shares his true tale of a nerd’s revenge. You can listen to more stories, and learn about Stoop shows and The Stoop podcast, all at stoopstorytelling.com.

Most mental-health care in the U.S. is delivered by social workers, more than psychiatrists and psychologists. As the American Association for Psychoanalysis in Clinical Social Work gathers here this weekend, we talk to two therapists about Baltimore’s special spot in the development of psychoanalysis, the challenges for therapists and residents in a city suffused with trauma, and how that influences the approach social workers take in therapy.

Credit Courtesy of the Jewish Museum of Maryland

Six million Jewish lives were lost during World War II and the Holocaust. A new exhibit at the Jewish Museum of Maryland explores the history of the Holocaust through the lens of the town of Auschwitz in Poland. Deborah Cardin, the museum’s deputy director, explains that today the town is known as the location of a massive complex of Nazi concentration camps. But before that, she says, "The town was a place where for hundreds of years, Jewish residents and non-Jewish residents lived side by side beginning in the 16th century." We also hear from Edie Creeger, whose mother survived the Holocaust in Hungary. Together, they, alongside other local survivors, created collages to tell their stories and honor their loved ones.

Although fears of terror attacks run high, how common are these events and who are the perpetrators? Why is it so difficult for policymakers to craft effective counterterrorism measures? We speak to Gary LaFree, professor of criminology and criminal justice at the University of Maryland College Park, and director of the ‘National Consortium for the Study of Terrorism and Responses to Terrorism’ there. He is co-author of the new book “Countering Terrorism: No Simple Solutions.”

Adam Croot / Flickr via Creative Commons

After rejecting the measure last year, the Baltimore City Council is expected to vote tonight on whether to adopt a $15 dollar minimum wage. The city currently follows the Maryland minimum wage and is on track to reach $10.10 per hour by 2020. David Cooper of the Economic Policy Institute tells us why he thinks a $15 minimum is necessary; Henry Holzer of the Brookings Institution tells us why he thinks it’s risky.

The older you are, the more likely you take multiple prescription drugs. More medications mean more risks - potential drug interactions and a greater chance of making a mistake. Dr. Nicole Brandt, executive director of the University of Maryland School of Pharmacy’s ‘Peter Lamy Center on Drug Therapy and Aging’, discusses how patients can talk to their doctors about paring down the number of med they’re taking.

Then, millions of seniors live with chronic pain. Dr. Beth Hogans, head of the National Institutes of Health ‘Center of Excellence for Pain Education’ at Johns Hopkins and medical director of the ‘Chronic Pain Program’ at Medstar Good Samaritan Hospital, offers strategies to reduce pain and increase quality of life.

Baltimore City is home to more than 30,000 veterans. It is also home to the Veterans Treatment Court - a special docket of Maryland’s District Court - which aims to rehabilitate, rather than incarcerate, former military members. We speak to two social workers from the VA-Maryland Health Care System, who work with veterans facing criminal charges, as well as with a Vietnam vet who graduated in January from the docket.

How many people can call Antarctica home? Here's Meg Adams speaking in 2011 about her time living at the South Pole research station in Antarctica. You can listen to more stories, and learn about Stoop shows and The Stoop podcast, all at stoopstorytelling.com.

President Trump’s plan to cut diplomacy and foreign-aid budgets by more than a third has drawn a sharp push back from many former diplomats, retired generals, international aid advocates and members of Congress--including some Republicans. The chairman of a key Senate appropriations subcommittee called the idea “dead on arrival.” We’ll ask Bill O’Keefe, Vice President for Advocacy at Catholic Relief Services, and retired Army Lt. Gen. H Steven Blum what they think would result from deep cuts in foreign aid.

In his speech to Congress, President Trump blamed a “slow and burdensome approval process” for holding up medical progress and drug development. We look at whom the president is considering to lead the Food and Drug Administration and how that choice might affect the process of approving drugs for market. Plus, what are the consequences of two of the president’s executive orders - one demanding that two regulations be cut for each new one adopted and another instituting a hiring freeze. 

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