Maureen Harvie | WYPR

Maureen Harvie

Producer, On The Record

Maureen Harvie is a producer for On The Record. She began her career at WYPR as an intern for the newsroom, where she covered issues ranging from medical marijuana to off-shore wind energy.  

She also photographed events around the city, such as Baltimore's Kinetic Sculpture Race, and created slideshows for the newsroom's website.

She is fan of politics, podcasts, and pop culture.  Maureen Harvie is a graduate of the University of Maryland, Baltimore County, and she studied radio production at Howard Community College.

Now, a Stoop Story from Faye Houston, about how a chance encounter while on the hunt for shark teeth took on a new meaning decades later.

You can find more stories, as well as the Stoop podcast and event information at stoopstorytelling.com.

National Press Foundation

Opioid overdoses are claiming more lives in Maryland, up by 70 percent last year over the year before, to an average of five a day. Gov. Hogan declared an emergency in March.

Whether it’s repairing defects, growing tissue, or customizing cell patterns, new technology is boosting the potential of regenerative medicine. We speak to Professor John P. Fisher, chair of the University of Maryland Fischell Department of Bioengineering, about the school’s new Center for Engineering Complex Tissue. And postdoctoral fellow Laurie Bracaglia describes her work using pericardial tissue, the thin tissue that surrounds the heart, as a graft material, as well as making printable “bio-ink” from this tissue.

Beverly Yuen Thompson / Flickr via Creative Commons

Last fall, fifteen companies won preliminary licenses to grow medical marijuana in Maryland, but the new industry has since been mired in legal challenges. Erin Cox of the Baltimore Sun gets us up to speed. Then, a large-scale study of a compound in cannabis finds it can reduce seizures that don’t respond to typical treatments. We speak to Dr. Orrin Devinsky, director of the Comprehensive Epilepsy Center at New York University Langone Medical Center. And Gail Rand, a mother, tells us how her son’s epilepsy prompted her to become an advocate for medical cannabis.

Kevin Darrow Brown shares a story about the joy and the pain of being a foster parent. You can find his story and others, as well as information about live Stoop shows, here.

Maureen Harvie / WYPR

This weekend Baltimore celebrates LGBT Pride with a parade, block party, food, music, and more. Mimi Demissew, executive co-director of the Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual and Transgender Community Center of Baltimore and Central Maryland, and co-chair of Baltimore Pride, tells us what this event means to her.

Insite

A stark picture of the toll that addiction is taking in Maryland came clear this month when the state issued its latest statistics: 2,089 people died from overdoses last year, an increase of two-thirds over 2015. Almost nine out of ten of these deaths were caused by opioids. In response to the epidemic, some are calling for approval of “safe consumption sites”--places where people can use illegal drugs with medical supervision. 

One of the ways many fathers connect with their children is through sports. Looking ahead to Father’s Day, we speak to former Baltimore Colt defensive lineman Joe Ehrmann about what it means to be a dad and about combating society’s harmful messages about masculinity.

A storytelling event in Baltimore encourages participants to share old diary entries, letters, and poems. One of the event’s producers, Alex Hewett, tells us how Mortified gives people the opportunity to reclaim embarrassing moments, laugh at themselves, and be vulnerable.

From forgetting someone’s name to getting caught with spinach in your teeth-- we all experience cringe worthy interactions. Psychologist Ty Tashiro tells us why these moments happen and why some people are more awkward than others. His new book is Awkward: The Science of Why We’re Socially Awkward and Why That’s Awesome.

DeRay Mckesson shares a Stoop Story about the transformative power of teaching and how his work as an activist is rooted in that experience. You can find his story and others at stoopstorytelling.com.

After four decades at the helm of the Chesapeake Center for Youth Development, Ivan Leshinsky is retiring. He tells us about the at-risk students CCYD serves in South Baltimore and Anne Arundel County. And former student, Aaron Beale, tells us how CCYD gave him skills and confidence.

As the Supreme Court approaches the end of its annual term, we catch up with University of Baltimore law professor Michael Meyerson about Justice Neil Gorsuch, President Trump’s travel ban, and the Court’s rulings on racial gerrymandering.

Comedian Chris Gethard is known for tackling tough subjects - like anxiety and depression - with vulnerability and candor. He joins us to talk about his podcast, "Beautiful Stories from Anonymous People," and why his talk show shuns traditional style for a more absurdist approach. Gethard will be performing at The Ottobar on Sunday, June 11th, the early show is a taping of his podcast.

David Ross shares a Stoop Story about childhood lessons from his grandmother, and how those lessons changed as he grew up. You can find his story and others at stoopstorytelling.com.

Food, music, art projects--and voter registration? The No Boundaries Coalition of West Baltimore is celebrating its 10th Annual Boundary Block Party tomorrow at Pennsylvania Avenue Triangle Park. The alliance of eight neighborhoods brings together residents across lines of class, race, and neighborhood, and encourages them to connect over issues like political engagement and the Baltimore police consent decree. We speak to two members of No Boundaries, Carol Moore, who serves on its board and co-director Ray Kelly.

Camilla Cerea / Patterson Park Audubon Center

Baltimore’s Patterson Park is home to more than 200 species of birds, birds hungry for berries, seeds, nectar, and insects. How do you create bird-friendly gardens that increase biodiversity and incorporate native plants? What does it take to master the subtle art of bird-watching? We speak to Susie Creamer, Director of Urban Education and Conservation at the Patterson Park Audubon Center, and Claire Wayner, the bird guide for Audubon's Bird Explorers.

Gage Skidmore / Flickr via Creative Commons

Adam Harris, who covers federal policy for The Chronicle of Higher Education, walks us through the potential impact of President Trump’s proposed budget on higher ed. Check out Harris' reporting here:

Top Federal Student-Aid Official Resigns Over Congressional Testimony

What Trump’s Proposed 2018 Budget Would Mean for Higher Ed

COD Newsroom / Flickr via Creative Commons

The size of student loan debt in the United States is staggering. About 44 million borrowers in the United States hold $1.3 trillion in outstanding student loans. A new report finds that about two-thirds of all student loan debt belongs to women, that women borrow more than men, and that it takes them longer to pay off their debt. Anne Hedgepeth, Senior Government Relations Manager at the American Association of University Women, joins us to discuss this report, “Deeper in Debt: Women and Student Loans".

Courtesy B'More Clubhouse website

For Tanya Phillips, mental illness made it hard for her to work or to be around others. Then she connected with B’More Clubhouse, a community that focused on her strengths, not her diagnosis. We speak with Tanya, and B’More Clubhouse executive director Jason Woody, about the work the non-profit does to support individuals with mental illness by  allowing them to check their diagnosis at the door, and instead concentrate on building community and developing skills. 

David Cook / Flickr via Creative Commons

From the shape of the nests birds build to the color of their feathers, technology is turning theories dating back to Darwin on their head. Biologist Jordan Price, of St Mary’s College of Maryland, has mapped the genes of both ancient and more recently derived bird species. He tells us why domed bird nests evolved into the widespread bowl shape, why the color of feathers might be more about camouflage than attraction, and what scientists got wrong when studying the differences between female and male birds.

A safe space to sleep can be lifesaving for infants, but families who are low-income, homeless, or transient may turn to unsafe alternatives - like sharing a bed or using the couch. We hear from Shantell Roberts, who has made it her mission to educate parents about safe-sleeping practices and developed a small, portable option. She is also founder of the nonprofit Touching Young Lives. Plus, Traci Kodeck, president and CEO of the nonprofit HealthCare Access Maryland, tells us about how they connect low-income mothers to services.

When Gov. Hogan declared the surge in heroin and other opioid deaths “a state of emergency,” he put Clay Stamp in charge of the fight. Clay Stamp is senior emergency management adviser to the governor and director of the Opioid Operational Command Center. He tells us what resources have been mobilized by the state of emergency and the prospects for making addiction treatment more available. Check out BeforeIt'sTooLate for information and resources related to the opioid overdose crisis.

JARC Baltimore / Facebook

Elaine Carroll tells On the Record about a job-training program she directs in Baltimore’s Park Heights neighborhood - the Jane Addams Resource Corporation, JARC. She describes the obstacles trainees face and how JARC Baltimore prepares low-income folks for careers in modern manufacturing.

@madeinbmorepopup / Instagram

In the response to the growing market for locally-made goods, Baltimore City's Department of Planning will now provide qualifying business with a "Made in Baltimore" certification. Coordinator Andy Cook tells us what value the city thinks this label will add to products. Plus we speak to Jamyla Bennu, co-founder of the hair- and skin-care brand, Oyin Homemade.

Governor Hogan's Facebook page

A day after Governor Hogan vetoed the Democrats’ approach to drawing congressional districts, we ask Len Lazarick, editor of Maryland Reporter, to recap how the system works, and the pressures to change it. Boundaries drawn after the 2010 Census helped Democrats gain a seat in Congress, and now a lawsuit challenges whether that round of redistricting violated the U.S. constitution. Plus, we ask Tufts professor Moon Duchin, how geometry can challenge gerrymandered districts.

For nearly four decades BJ Leiderman’s melodies have graced the public airwaves, accompanying radio programs such as Marketplace, Morning Edition and Wait, Wait, Don't Tell Me! We speak to him about how he got his start, his fear of success, and his debut album, just out, titled BJ.

When Stephen Morgan showed up in 1969, guitar in hand, to be a camp counselor at what is now The Arc-Baltimore, people with intellectual and developmental disabilities often lived in institutions, seldom on their own. Children with mental disabilities were not entitled to free, appropriate public education. Morgan has been head of The Arc Baltimore for three decades, and has witnessed big changes. Ahead of his retirement next month, we talk about what kinds of jobs make sense for people disabilities, what prompts businesses to hire them and what police need to understand about them.

Judy Centers, named for late wife of Maryland Congressman Steny Hoyer, provide early childhood education and family support services at Title I schools across Maryland. We speak to Crystal Francis, coordinator for Baltimore City’s Judy Centers, about how the centers connect families to community resources, such as GED prep and utility assistance. And parent Keisha Thornton talks about the educational value of Judy Centers.

Courtesty Enoch Pratt Free Library website

When Union General Oliver Otis Howard was named right after the Civil War to head the Freedman’s Bureau, Howard was creating a new kind of government agency, one that would take an active role in solving the problems of freed slaves and poor whites in the former Confederacy. A dozen years later, with the Freedman’s Bureau disbanded, Howard went west. Aided by a bright young officer from Baltimore, Howard led the fight against Chief Joseph and the Nez Perce Indians in Oregon. In this program, historian Daniel Sharfstein introduces us to those characters, and traces the arc of change in how the U.S. saw its governing role as he discusses his new book, Thunder in the Mountains.

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