Maureen Harvie | WYPR

Maureen Harvie

Producer, On The Record

Maureen Harvie is a producer for On The Record. She began her career at WYPR as an intern for the newsroom, where she covered issues ranging from medical marijuana to off-shore wind energy.  

She also photographed events around the city, such as Baltimore's Kinetic Sculpture Race, and created slideshows for the newsroom's website.

She is fan of politics, podcasts, and pop culture.  Maureen Harvie is a graduate of the University of Maryland, Baltimore County, and she studied radio production at Howard Community College.

DoD Photo by Navy Petty Officer 2nd Class Dominique A. Pineiro / Flickr via Creative Commons

In 2012, an investment company led by Jared Kushner--son-in-law and senior advisor to President Trump--and his father, Charles Kushner, began buying up apartments and townhomes in Baltimore County.

Over time, Kushner Companies’ filed hundreds of suits against tenants, even seeking unpaid rent from people who moved out of the property before Kushner Companies owned it.

Now Baltimore lawmaker Delegate Bilal Ali has introduced the “Jared Kushner Act”, which would prevent tenants from being subject to arrest for failing to pay rent.

We speak to Propublica reporter Alec MacGillis who broke the story last May. You can read the latest on the tenant's class action lawsuit here

Baltimore Police Department

For two-and-a-half weeks, testimony in the federal courtroom shocked some and confirmed the fears of others: witness after witness described an elite unit of the Baltimore police gone rogue, stealing hundreds of thousands of dollars in cash, drugs, guns and luxury accessories while pretending the seizures were legitimate law enforcement. The trial ended last night with Detectives Daniel Hersl and Marcus Taylor convicted of fraud, robbery and racketeering. WYPR reporter Mary Rose Madden covered the trial, and she’s here in studio.

Here’s a Stoop Story from Shindana Cooper about an ill-fated voyage with the Middle Passage Monument Project. You can hear her story and many others at stoopstorytelling.com, as well as the Stoop podcast.

Jack Burkert, senior educator at the Baltimore Museum of Industry, takes us back to the colonial origin of the Port, moving tobacco and then grain, and to the Port’s alliance with the B&O railroad expanding trade to the west. We hear about the human cargo--slaves, ripped from their families and sold to the South--as well as immigrants who passed through the port, seeking a new life in America.

The event at the Baltimore Museum of Industry - in partnership with the Irish Railroad Workers Museum - is this Saturday from 11 am-12 pm. 

MTA Facebook page

High frequency buses, dedicated bus lanes, new routes - BaltimoreLink launched last June, a $135-million-dollar reboot of the city’s transit system. What is ridership like? Are buses running on time?

Kevin Quinn, head of the Maryland Transit Administration, gives us an update on service and technology changes. And transit activist and blogger Danielle Sweeney describes her work tracking no-show buses and fostering rider feedback.

FORECAST / JHU Bloomberg School of Public Health/Bloomberg American Health Initiative

The synthetic opioid fentanyl is 50 to 100 times more powerful than the painkiller morphine. Fentanyl has overtaken heroin and cocaine as the driving force behind the epidemic of deaths from opioid overdoses. But not because drug users seek it out. Often users are unaware that fentanyl--or an even stronger tranquilizer for large animals, called carfentanil--has been added to the drugs they buy. Some say knowing fentanyl is present would change how they use drugs. 

Maryland Agricultural Resource Council

The learning curve for beekeeping is steep. How do you make sure your bees are healthy and happy--and that they don’t sting you? Devra Kitterman, pollinator program coordinator for the Maryland Agricultural Resource Council, tells us about their beginning beekeeper course--and her work as a swarm catcher. And managing director Wes Jamison tells us what else you can do on the 150-acre farm park --from hiking and sunflower picking to learning how to back up a horse trailer.

The summer before he starts high school, 14-year-old Miles doesn’t have much to do but get into trouble. He smokes weed; fights with his younger sisters; clashes with his parents, who are divorcing; obsesses over a crush; has few friends; and takes his skateboard anywhere around Baltimore that might pierce his adolescent boredom. We know all this from his diary-- it is the just-published novel "Kill Me Now," by author Timmy Reed.

Reed will be speaking at Atomic Books on February 1 (in conversation with Madison Smartt Bell) and Bird in Hand on February 8th (in conversation with Jane Delury).

Brian Flanagan, who was a Baltimore City firefighter, shares a Stoop Story about his scariest experience on the job. Flanagan passed away last fall.

You can hear his story and many others at stoopstorytelling.com.

Fred Pridham, February 9, 1904 / Wikimedia Commons

One hundred fourteen years ago, flames consumed Baltimore, turning entire city blocks into smoking rubble. How did Baltimore rise from the ashes? We speak to historian Wayne Schaumburg ahead of the fire's anniversary on February 7th. 

Those who escape the clutches of human trafficking often face a hurdle in building a new life: A criminal conviction that stems from the coercion they endured--charges like trespassing or prostitution, can block them from a job--or safe housing or a scholarship.

Lawyers Jessica Emerson and Laurie Culkin from the Human Trafficking Prevention Project - a partnership of the University of Baltimore School of Law and the Maryland Volunteer Lawyers Service -  describe how they help victims clear their criminal records.

Survivor advocate Shamere McKenzie tells us how she came to be trafficked and how charges arising from it have followed her. Shamere McKenzie is the Anti-Trafficking Program Director for the Salvation Army of Central Maryland, which runs a safe haven for victims of trafficking called Catherine’s Cottage.

Baltimore Police Dept.

Even before Mayor Pugh presented her new police commissioner to the press, Darryl DeSousa said, he had put into action his plan to curtail violence with waves of police on the street. We asked Councilman Brandon Scott and Councilman Ryan Dorsey, chair and vice of of the city council’s public-safety committee, how will that work? And executive director Ray Kelly gives us the view from the No Boundaries Coalition.

Peter Pucci

How do you depict the history of human migration through dance? Award-winning choreographer Peter Pucci has returned to his native Baltimore to put together a large-scale dance project called, Migration. It brings together local high school, college, and professional dancers, using movement and music to represent humankind’s connected lineage. Peter Pucci tells us about his unforeseen pivot from sports to dance, and why our linked ancestry matters. Migration will be performed on Sunday, January 28th in the Wellness and Athletic Center of CCBC Essex at 2 p.m. The performance is free, but tickets are required. More information here.

Here’s a Stoop Story from English teacher Murph McManus about finding an unexpected dance partner and a memorable polka. You can hear her story and many others at stoopstorytelling.com, as well as the Stoop podcast.

In the mid-19th century, an off-beat form of spirituality swept the U.S. People turned to mediums and seances, desperate to reach dead loved ones, especially those lost during the Civil War. Peter Manseau, curator of religion at the Smithsonian, describes how the advent of photography collided with the Spiritualist Movement, resulting in so-called “spirit photographs”. Manseau has written: “The Apparitionists: A Tale of Phantoms, Fraud, Photography, and the Man who Captured Lincoln’s Ghost”.

Civic Works

Many of us plan to live out our years in our homes. But if the steps are shaky or the bathtub has nowhere to grab, we might fall and get hurt. Lauren Averella, of the Baltimore nonprofit Civic Works, tells us about its efforts to upgrade seniors’ homes and make them safer. From installing grab bars to adding ramps, they offer an array of modifications so residents can age in place. 

Having a successful African-American physician as a father and a white mother who read her the works of Black authors was no barrier against the racism Julie Lythcott-Haims faced growing up in white Wisconsin. In her new book, "Real American: A Memoir", she describes her journey to self-acceptance and insight about what it means to be Black in America.

Baltimore City Health Dept.

343 people were killed in Baltimore last year, most of them, shot. In the wake of record homicides, two individuals are among those working on the street level to stop the killings. Erricka Bridgeford of Baltimore Ceasefire shares how she remains persistent and hopeful in the face of tragedy. And James ‘J.T.’ Timpson, Safe Streets community liaison officer, discusses the future of that effort, and what he thinks is behind the staggering number of homicides Baltimore saw in 2017.

UrbanFeel / Flickr via Creative Commons

After the Justice Department concluded the Baltimore Police Department had routinely violated citizens’ rights, Justice and the city last year agreed on a set of reforms, to be enforced by federal Judge James Bredar. He named a team to monitor police progress toward reforms, and that monitoring team has unveiled its plan for what the BPD needs to do, when. The principal deputy monitor, former Washington police chief Charles Ramsey, describes the process ahead.

Barnabus Tibertius / Flickr via Creative Commons

Computer scientist Philipp Koehn leads a group at Johns Hopkins University that’s building translation technology and targeting languages for which translated texts are not widely available - like Tagalog and Swahili. How do they do it?

NIH Clinical Center / Flickr via Creative Commons

As more people in America speak languages other than English, a program at Howard Community College prepares interpreters for the medical field. Instructor Lisette Albano and interpreter Hyon Lee describe how interpreters improve patient care while acting as a neutral party.

Here’s a Stoop Story from musician Wendel Patrick, co-producer of WYPR's Out of the Blocks, speaking about a photograph that inspired him. You can hear his story and many others at stoopstorytelling.com, as well as the Stoop podcast.

Svklimkin / Flickr via Creative Commons

If you have family photos collecting dust in shoeboxes or digital files encroaching on your computer’s desktop--it may be time for action! Light and water can deteriorate prints, and files can be lost as technology changes. Elizabeth England and Jim Stimpert, archivists with the Johns Hopkins University Sheridan Libraries' Special Collections, offer advice on photo preservation. They will be speaking on January 13th at an event at Hopkins' Homewood Museum.

Scout out talented students at HBCUs, prepare them for the rigors of law school, mentor them throughout their careers. The Fannie Angelos Program for Academic Excellence aims to boost diversity in the legal profession. We hear from the co-founders, University of Baltimore law professors Michael Higginbotham and Michael Meyerson, and we meet two graduates at the start of their law careers, Annice Brown and Keon Eubanks.

Diapers, bottles, onesies, pacifiers: Babies need a lot of things, including a safe place to sleep. For some families, the cost of a crib may be out of reach. For others, the birth may have come sooner than expected. And, if the baby spends the night away from home, a safe place to sleep is needed because cribs aren’t very portable.

It can be a matter of life and death. This year, 12 infants in the city died while sleeping -- a frightening increase compared with 7 deaths in 2016.

In May we spoke to Shantell Roberts, executive director of the nonprofit ‘Touching Young Lives’. She's now been named an Open Society Institute Baltimore Community Fellow.

Fresh produce can be hard to come by in the city’s Sandtown neighborhood. That’s why chef Ausar Daniels has created a farm - to grow fruits and vegetables for the community and educate kids about plant science. He tells us about his plans to expand "The Greater Mondawmin Empowerment Project" into a food co-op and biocellar.

OSI fellow Matt Burke is a volunteer who runs Food Rescue -- a project of the Baltimore Free Farm, through which unwanted but nutritious food is distributed. Part of mission: rescue some of the nearly 40 percent of the country’s food that goes to waste simply because it’s imperfect. Check out more information - including how to get involved -  here.

Drivers know all too well the frustration of clogged roads. Experts at the University of Maryland’s Center for Advanced Transportation Technology are diving in the ‘why’ --so deep into the data about traffic that about half the states turn to them for tools to manage congestion. CATT’s director Michael Pack says they can not only pinpoint the worst bottlenecks, but identify what caused them, how long the backups are, and how much they cost. Plus, Victor Henry and Ed Stylc, chief traffic-congestion management experts at the Baltimore Metropolitan Council, tell us how they use data to make recommendations to the state. 

This holiday season, while you’re baking cookies and cakes, note that line “baking powder” in some recipes. In the final product, it is invisible and tasteless, but what does baking powder do? And how has it shaped American cooking?

Food historian Linda Civitello’s new book is “Baking Powder Wars: The Cutthroat Food Fight that Revolutionized Cooking”.

A portrait of a president, an probe of Southern cuisine, a reboot of the Black Panther comic books. We’ve got books suitable for all the readers in your life--young and old, fans of pop and counterculture. These titles are perfect to read over the holidays, to give as gifts, or to share among friends.

Cullen Nawalkowsky of Red Emma’s Bookstore Coffeehouse and Deborah Taylor of the Enoch Pratt Free Library share their picks for the best recent books. 

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