Maureen Harvie | WYPR

Maureen Harvie

Producer, On The Record

Maureen Harvie is a producer for On The Record. She began her career at WYPR as an intern for the newsroom, where she covered issues ranging from medical marijuana to off-shore wind energy.  

She also photographed events around the city, such as Baltimore's Kinetic Sculpture Race, and created slideshows for the newsroom's website.

She is fan of politics, podcasts, and pop culture.  Maureen Harvie is a graduate of the University of Maryland, Baltimore County, and she studied radio production at Howard Community College.

From playing basketball in South Baltimore to churning out pints of cool mint chocolate chip and sweet honey graham. We speak with two of the founders of Taharka Brothers Ice Cream, Sean Smeeton and Carroll Skipwith, about the company’s start, its roots in the community, and the universal appeal of ice cream. 

Forgetting someone’s name, getting caught with spinach in your teeth. We all experience cringe worthy moments, but some people seem never to grow out of their awkward teenage years. Psychologist Ty Tashiro tells us why these mishaps happen and why some people are more awkward than others. His new book is Awkward: The Science of Why We’re Socially Awkward and Why That’s Awesome.

Teens who have lost someone they love may feel angry or overwhelmed, struggle to ask for help and withdraw from their friends. The nonprofit Roberta’s House aims to let young people know they are not alone in grief, and help them develop tools to work through their grief and rebuild their lives. We speak to Dorenzer Thomas, coordinator of youth and school-based services at Roberta’s House, volunteer Mary Dorsey, and three young people who tell us what they’ve gained from activities at Roberta’s House.

National Renewable Energy Lab / Flickr via Creative Commons

Two wind farms off the coast of Ocean City could be supplying electricity for tens of thousands of Maryland homes in a few years, now that Maryland regulators have OK’d a subsidy through a charge on utility customers’ bills. The projects are required to make big investments in steel fabrication and upgrading the former Sparrows Point shipyard. Advocates predict wind power will create thousands of jobs here, especially if Maryland moves faster than other east-coast states to build an offshore-wind industry. We’ll discuss the prospects with Paul Rich, director of project development for U.S. Wind, and Liz Burdock, executive director of the Business Network for Offshore Wind.

Historic St. Mary's City's Facebook page

Since the 1970s, archaeologists have sifted through the debris of St. Mary’s City, the capital of colonial Maryland. What have they learned from the bits of pottery and brick they’ve discovered? We ask Historic St. Mary’s City’s Chief Archeologist Travis Parno and ‘field school’ assistant Sarah McCoy. Then, Director of Research Henry Miller shares the mystery of three lead coffins discovered while excavating a chapel in 1990.

Ticket info for Tidewater Archaeology Weekend (July 29-30) is here.

Steve Walker shares a Stoop story about a broken drive shaft, a pretty girl, and a large chocolate milkshake. You can listen to more stories and learn about Stoop shows at stoopstorytelling.com.

One scoop or two? Cup or cone? You can’t go wrong with ice cream--whether it’s plain vanilla or an exotic mélange of candy and fudge. From the birth of the ice cream truck to the origin of the root beer float, we get a pop culture history of this delectable dessert from Amy Ettinger, author of the new book, "Sweet Spot: An Ice Cream Binge Across America".

Vital Signs 15 Housing & Community Development Maps / BNIA

Why is it important for each Baltimore neighborhood to understand the dozens of statistics that describe it and its people--where they live, how long it takes them to get work, how many of the homes around them are vacant? We ask Seema Iyer of the University of Baltimore, driving force behind the Baltimore Neighborhood Indicators Alliance, how such data can predict where things are going, not just trace the past. And we ask consultant Alyce Myatt about GeoLoom, a new interactive map that tracks elements of art and culture in every corner of the city.

Whether you are lazing by the pool or passing time at the airport, summer is a great time to get lost in a good book. Deborah Taylor of the Enoch Pratt Free Library shares selections that appeal to adults--thrillers, memoirs, and more. And Jamie Watson of the Baltimore County Public Library has ideas for books to catch the interest of children, teens, and reluctant readers.

Hamza Butt / Flickr via Creative Commons

Many families get sticker shock when they look at the cost of college - a number that doesn’t even take into account textbooks or trips home for the holidays. Money magazine senior writer Kim Clark walks us through why the cost of college keeps rising, as well as what to do when a financial aid package doesn’t measure up. Plus, a new ranking looks at which schools do the best job of moving low-income students into the middle class. Which colleges in Maryland made the list?

Now, a Stoop Story from former Baltimore City Councilman Joseph "Jody" Landers, about the constant commotion of growing up in Northeast Baltimore in a family of eight. You can find his story and others at Stoop Storytelling, as well as information about upcoming Stoop events and the show’s podcast.

Open Society Institute-Baltimore is supplying the city’s health department funds for another front in the fight against the opioid epidemic. The $200,000 grant is aimed at saving lives from overdose and reducing stigma around addiction. We speak to OSI director Diana Morris about what activities the grant will fund and how she'll measure the success of this investment.

When Union General Oliver Otis Howard was named right after the Civil War to head the Freedman’s Bureau, Howard was creating a new kind of government agency, one that would take an active role in solving the problems of freed slaves and poor whites in the former Confederacy. A dozen years later, with the Freedman’s Bureau disbanded, Howard went west. Aided by a bright young officer from Baltimore, Howard led the fight against Chief Joseph and the Nez Perce Indians in Oregon. In this program, historian Daniel Sharfstein introduces us to those characters, and traces the arc of change in how the U.S. saw its governing role as he discusses his new book, "Thunder in the Mountains". Original air date: May 1, 20172

For nearly four decades BJ Leiderman’s melodies have graced the public airwaves, accompanying radio programs such as Marketplace, Morning Edition, and Wait, Wait, Don't Tell Me! We speak to him about how he got his start, his fear of success, and his debut album, just out, titled BJ. Original air date: May 8, 2017.

What teen isn’t embarrassed by their parents? As we hear in this Stoop Story: For C E Snow, her mother’s intense celebrity obsession was particularly mortifying. You can find this story and others at the Stoop Storytelling site.

Friends of Patterson Park Facebook page

Music groups from around the world will gather for a concert at Patterson Park Sunday, part of a yearlong celebration of the centennial of President John F Kennedy’s birth and one of his signature legacies, the Peace Corps. Neeta Helms, president of Classical Movements, who will be performing and where they’re from. And we talk to Katie Long, program director and Hispanic liaison for the Friends of Patterson Park. She notes that Southeast Baltimore is a hub for immigrants, and says that makes this concert especially meaningful.

Thomas Hawk / Flickr via Creative Commons

Under President Trump the U.S. Justice Department announced it will pursue tougher criminal charges and tighter adherence to mandatory minimum sentences than during the Obama years. We talk to retired federal Judge Alexander Williams Jr. about the life sentence he was required to impose in a drug case in Prince George’s County -- and to the man he sentenced, Evans Ray Jr., now free on clemency from President Obama.

Now, a Stoop Story from Faye Houston, about how a chance encounter while on the hunt for shark teeth took on a new meaning decades later.

You can find more stories, as well as the Stoop podcast and event information at stoopstorytelling.com.

National Press Foundation

Opioid overdoses are claiming more lives in Maryland, up by 70 percent last year over the year before, to an average of five a day. Gov. Hogan declared an emergency in March.

Whether it’s repairing defects, growing tissue, or customizing cell patterns, new technology is boosting the potential of regenerative medicine. We speak to Professor John P. Fisher, chair of the University of Maryland Fischell Department of Bioengineering, about the school’s new Center for Engineering Complex Tissue. And postdoctoral fellow Laurie Bracaglia describes her work using pericardial tissue, the thin tissue that surrounds the heart, as a graft material, as well as making printable “bio-ink” from this tissue.

Beverly Yuen Thompson / Flickr via Creative Commons

Last fall, fifteen companies won preliminary licenses to grow medical marijuana in Maryland, but the new industry has since been mired in legal challenges. Erin Cox of the Baltimore Sun gets us up to speed. Then, a large-scale study of a compound in cannabis finds it can reduce seizures that don’t respond to typical treatments. We speak to Dr. Orrin Devinsky, director of the Comprehensive Epilepsy Center at New York University Langone Medical Center. And Gail Rand, a mother, tells us how her son’s epilepsy prompted her to become an advocate for medical cannabis.

Kevin Darrow Brown shares a story about the joy and the pain of being a foster parent. You can find his story and others, as well as information about live Stoop shows, here.

Maureen Harvie / WYPR

This weekend Baltimore celebrates LGBT Pride with a parade, block party, food, music, and more. Mimi Demissew, executive co-director of the Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual and Transgender Community Center of Baltimore and Central Maryland, and co-chair of Baltimore Pride, tells us what this event means to her.

Insite

A stark picture of the toll that addiction is taking in Maryland came clear this month when the state issued its latest statistics: 2,089 people died from overdoses last year, an increase of two-thirds over 2015. Almost nine out of ten of these deaths were caused by opioids. In response to the epidemic, some are calling for approval of “safe consumption sites”--places where people can use illegal drugs with medical supervision. 

One of the ways many fathers connect with their children is through sports. Looking ahead to Father’s Day, we speak to former Baltimore Colt defensive lineman Joe Ehrmann about what it means to be a dad and about combating society’s harmful messages about masculinity.

A storytelling event in Baltimore encourages participants to share old diary entries, letters, and poems. One of the event’s producers, Alex Hewett, tells us how Mortified gives people the opportunity to reclaim embarrassing moments, laugh at themselves, and be vulnerable.

From forgetting someone’s name to getting caught with spinach in your teeth-- we all experience cringe worthy interactions. Psychologist Ty Tashiro tells us why these moments happen and why some people are more awkward than others. His new book is Awkward: The Science of Why We’re Socially Awkward and Why That’s Awesome.

DeRay Mckesson shares a Stoop Story about the transformative power of teaching and how his work as an activist is rooted in that experience. You can find his story and others at stoopstorytelling.com.

After four decades at the helm of the Chesapeake Center for Youth Development, Ivan Leshinsky is retiring. He tells us about the at-risk students CCYD serves in South Baltimore and Anne Arundel County. And former student, Aaron Beale, tells us how CCYD gave him skills and confidence.

As the Supreme Court approaches the end of its annual term, we catch up with University of Baltimore law professor Michael Meyerson about Justice Neil Gorsuch, President Trump’s travel ban, and the Court’s rulings on racial gerrymandering.

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