Maureen Harvie | WYPR

Maureen Harvie

Producer, On The Record

Maureen Harvie is a producer for On The Record. She began her career at WYPR as an intern for the newsroom, where she covered issues ranging from medical marijuana to off-shore wind energy.  

She also photographed events around the city, such as Baltimore's Kinetic Sculpture Race, and created slideshows for the newsroom's website.

She is fan of politics, podcasts, and pop culture.  Maureen Harvie is a graduate of the University of Maryland, Baltimore County, and she studied radio production at Howard Community College.

Drivers know all too well the frustration of clogged roads. Experts at the University of Maryland’s Center for Advanced Transportation Technology are diving in the ‘why’ --so deep into the data about traffic that about half the states turn to them for tools to manage congestion. CATT’s director Michael Pack says they can not only pinpoint the worst bottlenecks, but identify what caused them, how long the backups are, and how much they cost. Plus, Victor Henry and Ed Stylc, chief traffic-congestion management experts at the Baltimore Metropolitan Council, tell us how they use data to make recommendations to the state. 

This holiday season, while you’re baking cookies and cakes, note that line “baking powder” in some recipes. In the final product, it is invisible and tasteless, but what does baking powder do? And how has it shaped American cooking?

Food historian Linda Civitello’s new book is “Baking Powder Wars: The Cutthroat Food Fight that Revolutionized Cooking”.

A portrait of a president, an probe of Southern cuisine, a reboot of the Black Panther comic books. We’ve got books suitable for all the readers in your life--young and old, fans of pop and counterculture. These titles are perfect to read over the holidays, to give as gifts, or to share among friends.

Cullen Nawalkowsky of Red Emma’s Bookstore Coffeehouse and Deborah Taylor of the Enoch Pratt Free Library share their picks for the best recent books. 

University of Maryland Medical System

Asthma makes it difficult for thousands of Baltimoreans to breathe. Decrepit houses, trash and rodents can trigger asthma flare-ups. Would cleaning up poor housing cost less than frequent trips to the ER? A reporting partnership between Kaiser Health News and the University of Maryland’s Capital News Service looked deeply at where asthma flares up in Baltimore and what hospitals are doing about it.

We hear from Kaiser Health News’ senior correspondent Jay Hancock, and from one of the Capital News Service journalists who took part in that project--now a reporter for The Baltimore Sun--Talia Richardson.

Plus, the Breathmobile is run by the University of Maryland Children’s Hospital. We speak to Dr. Mary Beth Bollinger, professor pediatrics, is the Breathmobile’s co-founder, and medical director.

More information at these links:

Kaiser Health News story - Hospitals Find Asthma Hot Spots More Profitable to Neglect Than Fix

Capital News Service package of asthma stories - Home Sick

A new report from the Environmental Integrity Project and the Abell Foundation documents stark difference in asthma hospitalization rates in rich versus poor neighborhoods in Baltimore, and reveals a dramatic drop in the far southern part of the city after a pair of nearby coal-fired power plants installed air pollution control devices in 2009. Asthma hospitalization rates in the zip codes for the Cherry Hill, Brooklyn, and Curtis Bay neighborhoods fell 57 percent between 2009 and 2013 – more than twice the drop citywide. 

Joan Gaither

Warm, cozy--and able to tell a story. We talk with artist and Baltimore native, Joan Gaither, who uses quilts to preserve and document American history. Her quilts are covered with beads, buttons, photos and fabrics of all colors. Now her quilts are on display at the Reginald F Lewis Museum in an exhibit called, “Freedom: Emancipation Quilted & Stitched”. Gaither describes putting her heart, soul, and identity into her quilts: It’s On the Record, after the news.

When he first started at Field and Stream, Bill Heavey realized the realm of outdoor writing was overpopulated with experts. What they needed was an amateur, up for any adventure and ready to fail spectacularly. To fill that niche, Heavey has gone deer-hunting in the woods of Kentucky, snowmobiling in the bush of eastern Alaska, and cross-country-skiing in the wilderness of Ontario. He tells about his love for nature, coaxing his daughter to join him outdoors, rethinking what it means to shoot a deer, and his new book, “Should the Tent Be Burning Like That?"

BHLI

Half of people behind bars suffer from addiction, an illness that may be the cause of their legal troubles. We look at two efforts to connect those in jail -- or on their way out -- to treatment.

In Washington County, nonviolent offenders can transition from jail to home detention, and receive addiction treatment in the form of a monthly shot. We speak to Rebecca Hogamier, director of the Washington County Sheriff's Office's Day Reporting Center.

And outside the Baltimore City Detention Center, a mobile clinic awaits the newly released. We speak to Deborah Agus, director of the nonprofit Behavioral Health Leadership Institute, and peer advocate William "JR" Jones.

Here’s a Stoop Story from Julie Hackett about her normal - not perfect - childhood. You can hear her story and many others at stoopstorytelling.com; the Stoop podcast is there, too.

Still lifes and landscapes, watercolors and oils. Artist James Hennessey came to Baltimore in 1965 to teach painting at MICA. Works from his five-decade career go on display at this weekend at the Creative Alliance--an exhibition called “Enduring Concerns”. Click here for information about the show.

Elementary to Middle School 28 / Flickr via Creative Commons

Maryland and many other states are facing teacher shortages, and yet the teaching profession loses 1 out of 5 teachers by their fifth year in the classroom. Educational researcher Linda Darling Hammond of the Learning Policy Institute says a range of factors, like planning time and access to materials, shape teachers’ decisions.

Check out the LPI map of "Understanding Teacher Shortages," and the report, "A Coming Crisis? Teacher Supply, Demand, and Shortages in the U.S".

And we hear from two Baltimore principals - Principal Patricia Burrell of North Bend Elementary/Middle School and Principal Marc Martin of Commodore John Rodgers Elementary/Middle School - about how they are supporting their teachers and fostering collaboration at their schools.

Brian Copeland / Flickr via Creative Commons

For neglected and abused children, foster parents offer stability, love, and a safe place to call home. Tawana Nolan, supervisor for out-of-home care in Harford County, talks training and recruiting foster parents. And we speak to Darrow Brown, of Baltimore City, and Tracey Horstmann, of Harford County, about the challenges and rewards of foster parenting.

To get more information about foster parenting, check out these links:

State Department of Health guide to becoming a foster parent

List of local offices for foster care or out-of-home care

Earrings. Necklaces. Tote bags. T-shirts. Fashionable, locally made, and designed by young people. ‘Youth in Business’ is an arts and business program that teaches young people how to create, market, and sell art products. It operates under the umbrella organization Jubilee Arts, which offers arts programming to the residents of Sandtown-Winchester, Upton, and surrounding neighborhoods.

We talk with Kim Loper, a community artist and former Americorps Fellow with Jubilee Arts. As one of this year’s ‘Open Society Institute Baltimore’ fellows, Kim will be working to expand Youth In Business into a design collective. We also meet Laila Amin, a sophomore at the Islamic Community School in West Baltimore who participates in the project.

The nonprofit Open Society Institute has awarded ten grants for community projects. We hear from one of the fellows, Ryan Flanigan, about the Remington Community Land Trust, an effort to create affordable home-buying access for low-income residents. And Terrell Askew, a resident of Remington and a member of the Greater Remington Improvement Association, shares his thoughts on preserving the neighborhood's character.

With no end in sight to the opioid overdose epidemic, the oversight committee of the U.S. Congress will hold a field hearing at Johns Hopkins Hospital this afternoon--to look at how the Trump administration is responding to the crisis. We speak to the committee’s top Democratic, Baltimore Congressman Elijah Cummings.

In some ways, caregiving is the new normal. One in four U.S. adult children provides unpaid care to an aging adult -- everything from hands-on physical care to shopping and household help. It can be exhausting, but it can also be a platform for a meaningful life, and a springboard to better understanding how you yourself will age, and how you can shape the kind of old age you want.

Ann Kaiser Stearns, a professor of behavioral science at the Community College of Baltimore County, combines research, insights and problem-solving tips in her new book, "Redefining Aging: A Caregiver’s Guide to Living Your Best Life".

Professor Stearns will be speaking about it Wednesday at noon at the Hatton Senior Center in Canton, part of the Enoch Pratt Free Library’s “Writers Live” series.

Thomas Hawk / Flickr via Creative Commons

Under President Trump, the U.S. Justice Department announced it will pursue tougher criminal charges and tighter adherence to mandatory minimum sentences than during the Obama years. We listen back to a conversation recorded this summer with retired federal Judge Alexander Williams Jr., about the life sentence he was required to impose in a drug case in Prince George’s County -- and with the man he sentenced, Evans Ray Jr., now free on clemency from President Obama. This program originally aired on June 26, 2017.

Click here for more information about the Judge Alexander Williams, Jr. Center for Education, Justice and Ethics at the University of Maryland.

Alex Ionno / Flickr via Creative Commons

Each week several dozen people in Maryland die from opioid use. Last summer, Nicki Neirman, a nursing staff coordinator, lost her fiance to a heroin overdose. She tells us of his episodes of treatment, and how his addiction disrupted their lives.

MICA

Digital, analog. One player, multi-player. Humans love games. We may not realize how much a part of our lives they are, and how much Baltimore is a hub for creating games. Jonathan Moriarty, chair of a non-profit for developers, tells us about Baltimore’s booming game industry, and what supports it. MICA has a game designer-in-residence. This year it’s Lishan AZ, who blends real life and digital in a project that explores the life of journalist Ida B. Wells. And the head of MICA’s game-design program, Jason Corace, tells us how play builds empathy.

“...It is not if we will experience darkness in a life well lived. It is when.” So writes Dr. Robert Wicks, a psychologist who helps caregivers deal with secondary stress. His new book is “Night Call: Embracing Compassion and Hope in a Troubled World”. We discuss his approach to building resiliency.

Cocaine in your cough drops, tobacco in your toothpaste. Internist Dr. Lydia Kang tells us about mystifying medical practices of yesteryear. Her new book is, “Quackery: A Brief History of the Worst Ways to Cure Everything”.

Here’s a Stoop Story from Kate Hanlon, about her younger sister, their loving mother, and a Nike sweatshirt. You can hear this story and many others at stoopstorytelling.com, as well as the Stoop podcast.

The next live Stoop show is November 16th at 8 pm the Creative Alliance. The theme is, "My Freaky Family". Tickets available here.

Whether it is gathering dust in a drawer or worn every day, nearly every one owns jewelry. And real or fake, this form of ornamentation has a story to tell. Shane Prada, director of the Baltimore Jewelry Center, tells us about a new exhibition, Radical Jewelry Makeover: Baltimore, that takes cast-off pieces and gives them new life. And Artist Mary Fissell describes the appeal of jewelry making.

Radical Jewelry Makeover: Baltimore is on display at the Baltimore Jewelry Center until February 4.

Bruno Fazenda / Flickr via Creative Commons

More than 4,600 children in Maryland live in out-of-home placements such as foster care, and studies show that LGBT youth tend to be overrepresented in the foster system.

Judith Schagrin is the assistant director for children’s services for Baltimore County. She gives us an overview of the training potential foster parents undergo. And we hear from former foster youth who identify as LGBT.

Did their sexual orientation affect their experiences? Did they feel prepared when they left foster care? How does Baltimore County ensure foster parents stand by ALL children?

Here’s a stoop story from Joe Sugarman about becoming a father for the second time … and how he and his wife followed their birth plan a little too by-the-book. You can hear his story and others at StoopStorytelling.com

Scout out talented students at HBCUs, prepare them for the rigors of law school, mentor them throughout their careers. The Fannie Angelos Program for Academic Excellence aims to boost diversity in the legal profession.

We hear from the co-founders, University of Baltimore law professors Michael Higginbotham and Michael Meyerson, and we meet two graduates at the start of their law careers, Annice Brown and Keon Eubanks.

As suicide rates approach a 30-year high, researchers are working to pinpoint the causes of suicide attempts and, determine how to keep people who are vulnerable to suicide... from access to the most lethal means of completing that act-- firearms. We hear from Dr. Paul Nestadt, psychiatrist and post-doctoral fellow at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. His research compares urban and rural suicide rates in Maryland.

The Samaritan Women's Facebook Page

For the past decade, survivors of domestic sex trafficking have found refuge at The Samaritan Women, a program in Baltimore that offers long-term housing and therapy.

Founder Jeanne Allert tells us why she was drawn to serve women who’ve experienced such exploitation and about The Samaritan Women’s spiritual focus. And we hear from two survivors - Cici and Alex - who are rebuilding their lives and planning for the future with the help of The Samaritan Women.

If the Trump presidency seems to be unfolding like a firehose of tweets and hysterical headlines, stay tuned for two experts who are looking to put it in context. Pulitzer-Prize-winning presidential historian Jon Meacham finds fundamental contrasts between the 45th chief executive and the 41st, the first President Bush.

And political scientist Todd Eberly of St. Mary’s College of Maryland has just co-authored a book titled "The Trump Presidency: Outsider in the Oval Office". Eberly will be speaking at 7:30 pm on November 7 on campus in the Daugherty-Palmer Commons building. 

Dean Shareski / Flickr via Creative Commons

One of the most common learning disabilities - dyslexia - complicates how a child learns to read and write. Because their brains are wired differently, students with dyslexia are at risk of falling behind their peers.

A radio documentary by APM Reports - Hard to Read: How American Schools Fail Kids with Dyslexia -  highlights the challenges dyslexic students in Baltimore County face in getting the services they need. Producer Emily Hanford tells us how the great debate over how to teach reading is leaving kids behind.

And Pamela Guest, an advocate with Decoding Dyslexia - Marylanddescribes the frustration of watching her son struggle to read. Guest is also the editor of IEP Magazine.

After a devastating fire in March 2016, The Book Thing--a free book depot--is back! Founder Russell Wattenberg tells us about the path to rebuilding and how the community stepped up.

Pages