Maureen Harvie | WYPR

Maureen Harvie

Producer, On The Record

Maureen Harvie is a producer for On The Record. She began her career at WYPR as an intern for the newsroom, where she covered issues ranging from medical marijuana to off-shore wind energy.  

She also photographed events around the city, such as Baltimore's Kinetic Sculpture Race, and created slideshows for the newsroom's website.

She is fan of politics, podcasts, and pop culture.  Maureen Harvie is a graduate of the University of Maryland, Baltimore County, and she studied radio production at Howard Community College.

Judy Centers, named for late wife of Maryland Congressman Steny Hoyer, provide early childhood education and family support services at Title I schools across Maryland. We speak to Crystal Francis, coordinator for Baltimore City’s Judy Centers, about how the centers connect families to community resources, such as GED prep and utility assistance. And parent Keisha Thornton talks about the educational value of Judy Centers.

Courtesty Enoch Pratt Free Library website

When Union General Oliver Otis Howard was named right after the Civil War to head the Freedman’s Bureau, Howard was creating a new kind of government agency, one that would take an active role in solving the problems of freed slaves and poor whites in the former Confederacy. A dozen years later, with the Freedman’s Bureau disbanded, Howard went west. Aided by a bright young officer from Baltimore, Howard led the fight against Chief Joseph and the Nez Perce Indians in Oregon. In this program, historian Daniel Sharfstein introduces us to those characters, and traces the arc of change in how the U.S. saw its governing role as he discusses his new book, Thunder in the Mountains.

Special Collections and Archives / Goucher College Library

As the United States prepared to enter World War I, another battle persisted on the home front--winning the vote for women. What happened when young women at Goucher College protested outside the White House? And why did Maryland refused to ratify the 19th amendment? Goucher alumna Hannah Spiegelman takes us behind the scenes of an ongoing exhibit at Goucher about the picket. You can see pictures of the exhibit here. And writer Elaine Weiss, whose book about suffrage is to be published by Viking Press next spring, explains the tremendous obstacles impeding ratification of the 19th amendment in 1920.

Benjamin A. Skolnik and Elizabeth Pruitt / University of Maryland Hornbake Library

It was at the Wye Plantation near Easton that the boy Frederick Douglass first realized he was not free. University of Maryland archaeologists have meticulously pieced together clues about the daily lives of the African Americans owned by the Lloyd family -- the garden they designed, the kitchen crops they grew, the foods they cooked and their religious symbols reflecting African spirituality as well as Christianity. Professor Mark Leone gives us a tour of the exhibit “Frederick Douglass & Wye House: Archaeology and African-American Culture in Maryland.”

WYPR

The recent General Assembly session made significant changes in state law about sexual assault, and held back from some other changes. Lawmakers said the state no longer has to prove force in order to prosecute a rape charge; the legislature also gave survivors of child sex abuse more time to sue in court. They did not approve a measure that would have allowed courts, when a child is conceived through rape, to terminate the parental rights of rapists.

Baltimore Speakers Series website

The Baltimore Speakers Series presented by Stevenson University wraps up its current season with an evening that delves into where America stands today on issues of race and reconciliation. Speaker Michele Norris, former host of NPR's All Things Considered and founder of The Race Card Project, offers a preview of Tuesday's discussion that she'll have with fellow speakers Jason Riley, a senior fellow at the Manhattan Institute and a columnist for the Wall Street Journal and Morris Dees, founder the Southern Poverty Law Center. You learn more about Michele Norris’s Race Card Project here and find information about the last evening of the 2016-2017 Baltimore Speakers Series presented by Stevenson University here

How does the Baltimore Improv Group, starting with the barest suggestions from the audience about characters and emotions, create a full-length improvised play? Dave LaSalle, one of the directors, and Tim German, one of the improvisers, take us inside the theatrical magic that ends up as Unscripted. Lights! Action? Cue -- who??

Get Out for Earth Day 2017

Apr 19, 2017
barnyz / Flickr via Creative Commons

Three days before Earth Day 2017 we look at several efforts to build momentum for a healthy environment. Up first, Carl Simon, interim director of the environmental watchdog group “Blue Water Baltimore,” tells us about a host of activities for Earth Day, from down-and-dirty trash removal to fledgling trees and flowers for planting. 

Imagine being a teenager faced with a devastating choice - either be drafted into the army of the country trying to gain control of your home or flee. For Dawit Gebremichael Habte, the only choice was to escape. Eventually, he resettled in the Maryland and focused his efforts on his education - attending Johns Hopkins University - with the goal of returning to help those he left behind. He shares his story in the new memoir, Gratitude in Low Voices.

Time now for another Stoop story, this time from Jim Karantonis, a psychiatric technician stationed at an army hospital during the Vietnam War. He describes an unusual game of baseball. 

Baltimore Heritage

Lions, demons, and devilish fiends--all can be spotted on Baltimore Heritage's gargoyle-themed walking tour of Downtown Baltimore. We hear from Executive Director Johns Hopkins about the nonprofit’s offerings, from tours of LGBT history sites in Mt. Vernon to a biking tour of delis and bakeries in East Baltimore--no spandex allowed! For more information about tours, click here. To suggest a tour, click here to contact Baltimore Heritage.

Johns Hopkins professor of psychiatry and mood disorders Kay Redfield Jamison, acclaimed author of An Unquiet Mind, trains her expertise on one of the most acclaimed poets of the 20th century in her new book Robert Lowell: Setting the River on Fire. We discuss how Lowell’s manic-depressive disease influenced his writing, the importance of his strength of character, and how common mania is among the creative.

Time now for another Stoop story. This week we hear a story from Mark Lowry about growing up in Baltimore’s Charles Village. You can listen to more stories, and learn about Stoop shows and The Stoop podcast, all at stoopstorytelling.com.

Rawlings Conservatory and Botanic Gardens

Tis the season for soil testing, buying seeds, and starting plants indoors. As the date of last frost approaches, we get advice on planning and prepping your garden from Erin Mellenthin, Master Gardener Coordinator for the University of Maryland Extension in Baltimore City, and Kate Blom, supervisor of the Rawlings Conservatory. 

For individuals with autism and their families, the transition from adolescence to adulthood can be uncertain, with concerns about work, housing, medical care, and more. We speak to advocate Pam Beck and her son, Brandon, as well as Keily Law, research director of the Interactive Autism Network, about supporting young people with autism as they journey into adulthood.

Last month, the Harriet Tubman Underground Railroad Visitor Center opened to the public in Dorchester County, on a 17-acre park. The center illustrates Tubman’s life and her work as a liberator. We speak to Chris Elcock, a senior associate at the Baltimore firm GWWO, Inc. Architects. He tells us how the center's design references Tubman's courage and the history of slavery in Maryland. Plus, historian Tony Cohen, founder of The Menare Foundation, describes what escape on the Underground Railroad was like.

Ben Hamburger

A MICA pop-up exhibit titled “Facing Change: Portraits and Narratives of the Shifting Cultural Landscape in East Baltimore” explores the consequences of urban development on a community. Artist Ben Hamburger’s portraits and audio narratives of East Baltimore residents offer different perspectives on development and the meaning of home. Check out more of Ben's work here.

Maryland’s highest court told judges to minimize use of money bail, and the Legislative Black Caucus backs that approach. But the Senate passed and sent to the House a bill saying judges MUST look at money bail, along with other options. All this after the bail-bond industry made big campaign donations to key legislators. We speak to Jennifer Bevan-Dangel, executive director of Common Cause Maryland, which tracked those campaign contributions, and Democratic Senator Anthony Muse, who sponsored the bill.

This week we hear a story from Hope Marshall, about her struggle with depression and the stigma surrounding mental illness. You can listen to more stories, and learn about Stoop shows and The Stoop podcast, all at stoopstorytelling.com.

Writer and journalist Alex Kotlowitz has written books, articles, radio shows and a TV documentary about various ways urban violence affects young people and shapes their lives. On Monday he’ll be in Baltimore for the Johns Hopkins “Social Determinants of Health Symposium.”

via The Emporiyum

A free, public conference this weekend at the American Visionary Arts Museum builds upon its current exhibit about the future of food. We hear from presenter Deborah Mizeur, the co-owner of Apotheosis Herb Farm on Maryland's Eastern Shore. Conference details available here

Dorian Gray shares his true tale of a nerd’s revenge. You can listen to more stories, and learn about Stoop shows and The Stoop podcast, all at stoopstorytelling.com.

Most mental-health care in the U.S. is delivered by social workers, more than psychiatrists and psychologists. As the American Association for Psychoanalysis in Clinical Social Work gathers here this weekend, we talk to two therapists about Baltimore’s special spot in the development of psychoanalysis, the challenges for therapists and residents in a city suffused with trauma, and how that influences the approach social workers take in therapy.

Credit Courtesy of the Jewish Museum of Maryland

Six million Jewish lives were lost during World War II and the Holocaust. A new exhibit at the Jewish Museum of Maryland explores the history of the Holocaust through the lens of the town of Auschwitz in Poland. Deborah Cardin, the museum’s deputy director, explains that today the town is known as the location of a massive complex of Nazi concentration camps. But before that, she says, "The town was a place where for hundreds of years, Jewish residents and non-Jewish residents lived side by side beginning in the 16th century." We also hear from Edie Creeger, whose mother survived the Holocaust in Hungary. Together, they, alongside other local survivors, created collages to tell their stories and honor their loved ones.

Although fears of terror attacks run high, how common are these events and who are the perpetrators? Why is it so difficult for policymakers to craft effective counterterrorism measures? We speak to Gary LaFree, professor of criminology and criminal justice at the University of Maryland College Park, and director of the ‘National Consortium for the Study of Terrorism and Responses to Terrorism’ there. He is co-author of the new book “Countering Terrorism: No Simple Solutions.”

Adam Croot / Flickr via Creative Commons

After rejecting the measure last year, the Baltimore City Council is expected to vote tonight on whether to adopt a $15 dollar minimum wage. The city currently follows the Maryland minimum wage and is on track to reach $10.10 per hour by 2020. David Cooper of the Economic Policy Institute tells us why he thinks a $15 minimum is necessary; Henry Holzer of the Brookings Institution tells us why he thinks it’s risky.

The older you are, the more likely you take multiple prescription drugs. More medications mean more risks - potential drug interactions and a greater chance of making a mistake. Dr. Nicole Brandt, executive director of the University of Maryland School of Pharmacy’s ‘Peter Lamy Center on Drug Therapy and Aging’, discusses how patients can talk to their doctors about paring down the number of med they’re taking.

Then, millions of seniors live with chronic pain. Dr. Beth Hogans, head of the National Institutes of Health ‘Center of Excellence for Pain Education’ at Johns Hopkins and medical director of the ‘Chronic Pain Program’ at Medstar Good Samaritan Hospital, offers strategies to reduce pain and increase quality of life.

Baltimore City is home to more than 30,000 veterans. It is also home to the Veterans Treatment Court - a special docket of Maryland’s District Court - which aims to rehabilitate, rather than incarcerate, former military members. We speak to two social workers from the VA-Maryland Health Care System, who work with veterans facing criminal charges, as well as with a Vietnam vet who graduated in January from the docket.

How many people can call Antarctica home? Here's Meg Adams speaking in 2011 about her time living at the South Pole research station in Antarctica. You can listen to more stories, and learn about Stoop shows and The Stoop podcast, all at stoopstorytelling.com.

President Trump’s plan to cut diplomacy and foreign-aid budgets by more than a third has drawn a sharp push back from many former diplomats, retired generals, international aid advocates and members of Congress--including some Republicans. The chairman of a key Senate appropriations subcommittee called the idea “dead on arrival.” We’ll ask Bill O’Keefe, Vice President for Advocacy at Catholic Relief Services, and retired Army Lt. Gen. H Steven Blum what they think would result from deep cuts in foreign aid.

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