Nathan Sterner

Local Host, Morning Edition Director/Co-Host, Maryland Morning

You can hear Nathan from 5:18 am to 3 pm on weekdays, giving you news headlines, weather, and interviews. Nathan can be heard on the locally produced Maryland Morning and he also co-hosts WYPR's Friday morning Spotlight on Station North.Before coming to WYPR in September of 2005, Nathan spent 8 years at WAMU in Washington -- working every job from part-time receptionist to on-air host, gaining experience in promotions, fundraising, audience analysis, and program production.  Nathan has also served as a fundraising consultant, and helped dozens of public radio stations nationwide with their on-air fundraisers.Nathan originally hails from rural Pennsylvania, but has lived in Baltimore since 2005.

Aqua.org

 

Big change is coming to the National Aquarium's 35-year old dolphin exhibit.  Last month, Aquarium CEO and marine conservationist John Racanelli announced that the institution will move its small population of dolphins to a marine sanctuary somewhere in the Florida/Caribbean area by the year 2020. The decision comes five years after the Aquarium ended its traditional dolphin shows, and follows protests at the Inner Harbor facility by activists calling for more humane treatment of dolphins. The proposed sanctuary has been applauded by many animal welfare groups.  Dr. Heather Rally, a wildlife veterinarian with the research and conservation arm of PETA (People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals), calls the transfer of the dolphins to a non-breeding marine sanctuary "a monumental move."

The dandy charger, the velocipede, the draisine -- all names for the first versions of the bicycle, which sprung to life in the early 19th century. Bicycles played a role in shaping attitudes about fashion, exercise, and child-rearing. Faced with cobblestones and potholes, early adopters in America petitioned the government to improve road conditions. Before setting their sights on flight, the Wright brothers repaired and manufactured bicycles. They even used bikes to test out early propeller designs. Riding a bike is not just a childhood milestone, it’s a hobby, a sport, and way to circumvent congested commutes. We speak to Margaret Guroff, author of “The Mechanical Horse: How the Bicycle Reshaped American Life."

Rob Sivak/WYPR

Baltimore is a city known for many things, but one of its greatest assets may be its artistic community. A driving engine of that community is MICA, the Maryland Institute College of Art. Founded in 1826, it’s the oldest art and design college in the country. But old as it is, the world-renowned school is all about innovation.  The latest evidence of that is the new program called MICApreneurship. Launched last September, it aims to promote and seed student business enterprises that incorporate artistic and design elements.  And it’s doing so through its new annual UP/Start Venture Competition, a “Shark-Tank”-like contest, the first of which was held on April 28th. MICA student- and alumni-applicants pitched their business plans to a panel of judges, vying for a piece of a $100,000 pool of foundation-supported development grants.

Joining co-host Nathan Sterner in the Maryland Morning studio this morning are members of three of the four winning teams of MICA's  first UP/Start Venture Competition...

Have you had a cup of coffee today? A piece of fruit? You can thank a bee. In fact, most of the plants that provide our food require pollinators. That’s also true of most of the flowers we enjoy. Yet many bees, butterflies, and other pollinator species are in decline. Pesticide use and habitat loss are among the reasons. So what can the average Marylander do? Garden with pollinators in mind! Master gardener Patricia Foster, executive director of the Cylburn Arboretum Association, and Vincent Vizachero, manager for Herring Run Nursery, a non-profit nursery that specializes in native plants, are here to give advice and take your questions.

Today, the latest on the fast-spreading Zika virus.  Once just a Latin American health problem, the mosquito-borne disease has become a global health emergency, with dozens of cases reported across the US, several in DC and Virginia, and on February 11th, the first reported case in Maryland. Baltimore City Health Commisioner Dr. Leana Wen sits down with Nathan Sterner to tell us what’s known about the Zika virus, and what steps the city is taking to raise public awareness of this emerging public health threat.

Then, a rollicking studio session with Juanito Pascual and his New Flamenco Trio, giving a taste of what they’ll be sharing tonight at the Weinberg Center for the Arts in Frederick.

And just in time for the romantic weekend, our regular foodie and restaurant owner Sascha Wolhandler stops by with some delectable dessert ideas for Valentine’s Day.

Gabriele Febbo

Today, the latest on the fast-spreading Zika virus.  Once just a Latin American health problem, the mosquito-borne disease has become a global health emergency, with dozens of cases reported across the US, including several in DC and Virginia and on Thursday, the first reported case in Maryland. Baltimore City Health Commissioner Dr. Leana Wen sits down with Nathan Sterner to tell us what’s known about the Zika virus, and what steps the city is taking to counter this emerging public health threat.

Nathan Sterner / WYPR

Schools in Central Maryland remain closed today.

Schools on the Upper Shore plan to open, but later than usual:

TWO HOUR DELAY: Caroline County schools and Kent County schools

90 MINUTE DELAY: Queen Anne's County schools and Talbot County schools

Nathan Sterner / WYPR

Last night's snowfall has left this morning's roads icy; officials urge you to be careful on untreated roads, bridges, and overpasses -- and to drive more slowly and carefully than usual.

Some schools are changing their schedules:

In 2010 Baltimore unveiled Vacants to Value, an effort to rehab abandoned properties and eliminate blight across the city. But, while officials have boasted that more than 1,500 houses have been renovated and occupied through the program, a recent investigation found that the real number is closer to just 900 homes.

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