Sheilah Kast | WYPR

Sheilah Kast

Host, On The Record

Sheilah Kast is the host of On The Record, Monday-Friday, 9:30-10:00 am.  Originally, she hosted WYPR's  Dupont-Columbia University award-winning Maryland Morning with Sheilah Kast from 2006 - October 2015.  She began her career at The Washington Star, where she covered the Maryland and Virginia legislatures, utilities, energy and taxes, as well as financial and banking regulation.  She learned the craft of broadcasting at ABC News; as a Washington correspondent for fifteen years, she covered the White House, Congress, and the 1991 Moscow coup that signaled the end of the Soviet empire.  Sheilah has been a substitute host on NPR’s Weekend Edition Sunday and The Diane Rehm Show.  She has launched and hosted two weekly interview shows on public TV, one about business and one about challenges facing older people.

Courtesy of Brien Haigley and Rich Polt

  

75 years ago, December 7, 1941, Americans were stunned by a Japanese aerial attack on the U.S. naval base at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. More than 2,400 Americans were killed. The next day, December 8, the United States declared war on Japan, propelling America into World War II. We’ll hear from two men who lived through it - one a boy who lived near the naval station, one a young man in Baltimore. And we hear from the son of a World War II soldier who has made it his mission to keep survivors’ stories alive.

In 1989, the environmental activist Bill McKibben wrote a bestseller called “The End of Nature.” It painted an apocalyptic picture of the state of the planet. Nearly three decades later, we take a look at a book of essays by the generation that grew up after McKibben laid out his vision. “They’re the first generation that learned the mantra Reduce, Reuse, Recycle from Sesame Street. They’re the first generation to see really tangible evidence of changes in the environment from garbage islands floating to ice caps melting,” says Susan Cohen, co-editor of “Coming of Age at the End of Nature: A Generation Faces Living on a Changed Planet.” She joins us, along with two young writers who contributed essays to the book, James Orbesen and Emily Schosid

Baltimorecity.gov

Today is Stephanie Rawlings-Blake’s last as mayor of Baltimore City. We take a look back at her 7-year tenure with two reporters who have covered her for years. From one of the worst snowstorms in city history to the unrest of April 2015 and the violent crime that surged afterwards, we discuss how Rawlings-Blake fared. Her accomplishments, her failures and her personal style, which some critics came to see as a liability.  A report card on the mayor, with Baltimore Brew reporter Mark Reutter and former Baltimore Sun reporter Julie Scharper.

Today we hear story from Prescott Gaylord, told first in 2012, about growing up as a Scientologist and how this affected his relationship with his father. His story has been edited for brevity. 

The priest who would become Pope Francis impressed his Jesuit superiors in Argentina from early on, taking on more responsibilities, sure of himself - until it became apparent that he had divided the Jesuit community - and he was sent away to a kind of internal exile that lasted two years. Mark Shriver, nephew of President John F. Kennedy, head of an international lobby network for children, former Maryland state legislator, discusses his new biography of the 266th pope. It's titled, “Pilgrimage: My Search for the Real Pope Francis.”

Jacob Stewart/Flickr via Creative Commons

When you cannot sleep, the middle of the night can be a harrowing spot. Insomnia is all too familiar for many of us. Dr. Emerson Wickwire, director of the insomnia program at the University of Maryland Medical Center, joins us to talk about the causes of this maddening affliction and how best to summon the snooze.

Gage Skidmore and DBKing / Flickr via Creative Commons

Since Justice Antonin Scalia died last February, the Supreme Court has operated with only eight justices; President Obama nominated a replacement, and Senate Republicans refused to consider him. What’s been the impact of this lasting vacancy? We speak to University of Baltimore law professor Michael Meyerson about the future of the Supreme Court under President Trump, and how extreme political polarization has shaped Americans’ view of the Court. Plus, a preview of some upcoming cases, including one that involves the death penalty -- and one that could involve the Washington Redskins.

JIMMIE / Flickr via Creative Commons

Fall is here and the school year is well under way. But some parents don’t have to worry about packing a lunch or getting their kids to the bus stop on time. They are homeschoolers, and nationwide, they’re a growing demographic. In Maryland, there are about 27,000 homeschooled kids. What motivates parents to homeschool? Is homeschooling possible in households with working parents? What are the benefits, and the challenges? 

Time for the next installment in our weekly feature from the Stoop Storytelling Series! Bridget Cavaiola shares a story about nuns, a dead bird, and the value of neighbors. Her story has been edited for brevity. The full version is available here

PETER FAVELLE / Flickr via Creative Commons

Maryland has too many deer. They cause tens of thousands of car accidents every year and over-browsing by hungry deer damages native ecosystems. The state typically tries to keep the population down through hunting. But some animal-rights advocates believe wildlife managers should explore other methods. 

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