Sheilah Kast | WYPR

Sheilah Kast

Host, On The Record

Sheilah Kast is the host of On The Record, Monday-Friday, 9:30-10:00 am.  Originally, she hosted WYPR's  Dupont-Columbia University award-winning Maryland Morning with Sheilah Kast from 2006 - October 2015.  She began her career at The Washington Star, where she covered the Maryland and Virginia legislatures, utilities, energy and taxes, as well as financial and banking regulation.  She learned the craft of broadcasting at ABC News; as a Washington correspondent for fifteen years, she covered the White House, Congress, and the 1991 Moscow coup that signaled the end of the Soviet empire.  Sheilah has been a substitute host on NPR’s Weekend Edition Sunday and The Diane Rehm Show.  She has launched and hosted two weekly interview shows on public TV, one about business and one about challenges facing older people.

Amit Peled

Dedication and hard work really can make childhood dreams come true. We meet international musician Amit Peled. He plays the cello once owned by Pablo Casals, the renowned musician who inspired him as a boy. The book, “A Cello Named Pablo,” tells the story, urging children to pursue their dreams. Then we visit Peled at his studio to learn what it’s like to teach and study at the world famous Johns Hopkins Peabody Institute. Information about the book release and free concert on Dec. 17, 2017 at An Die Musik can be found here.

When he first started at Field and Stream, Bill Heavey realized the realm of outdoor writing was overpopulated with experts. What they needed was an amateur, up for any adventure and ready to fail spectacularly. To fill that niche, Heavey has gone deer-hunting in the woods of Kentucky, snowmobiling in the bush of eastern Alaska, and cross-country-skiing in the wilderness of Ontario. He tells about his love for nature, coaxing his daughter to join him outdoors, rethinking what it means to shoot a deer, and his new book, “Should the Tent Be Burning Like That?"

Open Society Institute Baltimore

Living in a food desert -- where fresh, healthy food is not easily accessible -- is reality for one in four Baltimore City residents. We meet Eric Jackson, of the Black Yield Institute, who is working to combat what he calls ‘food apartheid.’  Jackson is a 2017 Open Society Institute Baltimore fellow; he’ll receive $60,000 over the next 18 months to create the ‘Building Black Land and Food Sovereignty Practice.’ Working in the Cherry Hill and Poppleton neighborhoods, Jackson intends to organize community-driven cooperative food ventures to create access to nutritious, affordable foods. We also meet Faith Cunningham, a resident of Cherry Hill, to learn what her grocery options really look like and why she's willing to travel to find healthier foods.

BHLI

Half of people behind bars suffer from addiction, an illness that may be the cause of their legal troubles. We look at two efforts to connect those in jail -- or on their way out -- to treatment.

In Washington County, nonviolent offenders can transition from jail to home detention, and receive addiction treatment in the form of a monthly shot. We speak to Rebecca Hogamier, director of the Washington County Sheriff's Office's Day Reporting Center.

And outside the Baltimore City Detention Center, a mobile clinic awaits the newly released. We speak to Deborah Agus, director of the nonprofit Behavioral Health Leadership Institute, and peer advocate William "JR" Jones.

Here’s a Stoop Story from Julie Hackett about her normal - not perfect - childhood. You can hear her story and many others at stoopstorytelling.com; the Stoop podcast is there, too.

Still lifes and landscapes, watercolors and oils. Artist James Hennessey came to Baltimore in 1965 to teach painting at MICA. Works from his five-decade career go on display at this weekend at the Creative Alliance--an exhibition called “Enduring Concerns”. Click here for information about the show.

Deborah Roffman

The intense reckoning America is experiencing around sexual harassment didn’t come out of nowhere.  We talk with Deborah Roffman, author and human sexuality educator at the Park School of Baltimore, about eye-opening events in the past five years that changed attitudes about taking what you want versus getting permission. Roffman teaches boys and girls as young as 9--fourth graders--and says forming personal boundaries starts with building self-respect.

Vera Institute of Justice

As the Trump Administration bears down on immigration enforcement, what is the recourse of immigrants facing deportation, who are often without funds to enlist a lawyer’s help, or even the basic understanding of what that would mean? We hear from Annie Chen a program director from the Vera Institute of Justice about the SAFE Cities Network initiative. It’s a nationwide effort to bolster access to legal representation for immigrants and also provide education regarding legal rights. Also joining us is Tracy Brown, deputy director of Open Society Institute Baltimore that works with the local immigrant community. We also meet  Val Twanmoh, director of the Catholic Charities Esperanza Center, which will receive some of the SAFE Cities funding, and Heather Benno, managing attorney of immigration legal services at Esperanza Center.

Elementary to Middle School 28 / Flickr via Creative Commons

Maryland and many other states are facing teacher shortages, and yet the teaching profession loses 1 out of 5 teachers by their fifth year in the classroom. Educational researcher Linda Darling Hammond of the Learning Policy Institute says a range of factors, like planning time and access to materials, shape teachers’ decisions.

Check out the LPI map of "Understanding Teacher Shortages," and the report, "A Coming Crisis? Teacher Supply, Demand, and Shortages in the U.S".

And we hear from two Baltimore principals - Principal Patricia Burrell of North Bend Elementary/Middle School and Principal Marc Martin of Commodore John Rodgers Elementary/Middle School - about how they are supporting their teachers and fostering collaboration at their schools.

Brian Copeland / Flickr via Creative Commons

For neglected and abused children, foster parents offer stability, love, and a safe place to call home. Tawana Nolan, supervisor for out-of-home care in Harford County, talks training and recruiting foster parents. And we speak to Darrow Brown, of Baltimore City, and Tracey Horstmann, of Harford County, about the challenges and rewards of foster parenting.

To get more information about foster parenting, check out these links:

State Department of Health guide to becoming a foster parent

List of local offices for foster care or out-of-home care

Helen Glazer

Artists have always drawn inspiration from nature. The grace of a crashing ocean wave, the warm palette of autumn leaves, the luminescence of a full moon. But … a stark, snow and ice-covered tundra? That’s where photographer and sculptor, Helen Glazer, toured and made images over the course of seven weeks as part of the ‘Antarctic Artists and Writers’ program. She won the grant from the National Science Foundation in 2015. Her exhibit, Walking in Antarctica, is on display through January 12, 2018 at the Rosenberg Gallery at Goucher College.

Robert Shetterly americanswhotellthetruth.org

Baltimore welcomes a new discussion series that promises ‘conversation with a purpose.' It's called Great Talk. Co-founder Diane Davison gives us an overview, and we meet former National Security Agency executive and whistleblower, Thomas Drake. He will headline the panel for the inaugural event next week, titled: ‘Cyber Wars, the Secrets, the Spies’. A few years into his tenure at the NSA, Drake brought concerns about wasteful spending and questionable surveillance to his superiors, ... but was thwarted, then charged with espionage ... His life hasn't been the same.

Open Society Institute Baltimore

Combining his longtime advocacy for people with disabilities and his criminal law background, 2017 ‘Open Society Institute Baltimore’ fellow, Munib Lohrasbi plans to create the ‘Prisoner Protection and Advocacy Committee.’ Working in partnership with Disability Rights Maryland, Lohrasbi will perform site visits and observe how intake screenings are done; then he’ll compile and disseminate the data. OSI is a nonprofit that focuses on addressing the needs of Baltimore’s underserved communities and supporting innovative solutions to longstanding problems. 

Earrings. Necklaces. Tote bags. T-shirts. Fashionable, locally made, and designed by young people. ‘Youth in Business’ is an arts and business program that teaches young people how to create, market, and sell art products. It operates under the umbrella organization Jubilee Arts, which offers arts programming to the residents of Sandtown-Winchester, Upton, and surrounding neighborhoods.

We talk with Kim Loper, a community artist and former Americorps Fellow with Jubilee Arts. As one of this year’s ‘Open Society Institute Baltimore’ fellows, Kim will be working to expand Youth In Business into a design collective. We also meet Laila Amin, a sophomore at the Islamic Community School in West Baltimore who participates in the project.

The nonprofit Open Society Institute has awarded ten grants for community projects. We hear from one of the fellows, Ryan Flanigan, about the Remington Community Land Trust, an effort to create affordable home-buying access for low-income residents. And Terrell Askew, a resident of Remington and a member of the Greater Remington Improvement Association, shares his thoughts on preserving the neighborhood's character.

With no end in sight to the opioid overdose epidemic, the oversight committee of the U.S. Congress will hold a field hearing at Johns Hopkins Hospital this afternoon--to look at how the Trump administration is responding to the crisis. We speak to the committee’s top Democratic, Baltimore Congressman Elijah Cummings.

In some ways, caregiving is the new normal. One in four U.S. adult children provides unpaid care to an aging adult -- everything from hands-on physical care to shopping and household help. It can be exhausting, but it can also be a platform for a meaningful life, and a springboard to better understanding how you yourself will age, and how you can shape the kind of old age you want.

Ann Kaiser Stearns, a professor of behavioral science at the Community College of Baltimore County, combines research, insights and problem-solving tips in her new book, "Redefining Aging: A Caregiver’s Guide to Living Your Best Life".

Professor Stearns will be speaking about it Wednesday at noon at the Hatton Senior Center in Canton, part of the Enoch Pratt Free Library’s “Writers Live” series.

Eric Beatty, who dreamed about life as a father, but as a divorced dad didn’t think it would come true for him. After 18 years of marriage he moved into a house five minutes from his ex, and set out to co-raise their three kids, Dylan, Georgia and Sam. Here’s some of what he learned along the way.

You can hear other Stoop stories and the Stoop podcast at stoopstorytelling.com.

Thomas Hawk / Flickr via Creative Commons

Under President Trump, the U.S. Justice Department announced it will pursue tougher criminal charges and tighter adherence to mandatory minimum sentences than during the Obama years. We listen back to a conversation recorded this summer with retired federal Judge Alexander Williams Jr., about the life sentence he was required to impose in a drug case in Prince George’s County -- and with the man he sentenced, Evans Ray Jr., now free on clemency from President Obama. This program originally aired on June 26, 2017.

Click here for more information about the Judge Alexander Williams, Jr. Center for Education, Justice and Ethics at the University of Maryland.

Dennis Wong / Flickr via Creative Commons

Why do some smells repel us more than others … and why do some immediately trigger a memory? How does our sense of smell interact with other senses, like hearing and sight? Why does an older woman, if her sense of smell grows less acute, have a smaller social circle -- but the same is not true of older men? We talk about all that and more with Johan Lundstrom, a cognitive psychologist who does research at the Monell Chemical Sense Center in Philadelphia and the Karolinska Institutet in Stockholm, Sweden. Original air date: 7.17.17

Alex Ionno / Flickr via Creative Commons

Each week several dozen people in Maryland die from opioid use. Last summer, Nicki Neirman, a nursing staff coordinator, lost her fiance to a heroin overdose. She tells us of his episodes of treatment, and how his addiction disrupted their lives.

MICA

Digital, analog. One player, multi-player. Humans love games. We may not realize how much a part of our lives they are, and how much Baltimore is a hub for creating games. Jonathan Moriarty, chair of a non-profit for developers, tells us about Baltimore’s booming game industry, and what supports it. MICA has a game designer-in-residence. This year it’s Lishan AZ, who blends real life and digital in a project that explores the life of journalist Ida B. Wells. And the head of MICA’s game-design program, Jason Corace, tells us how play builds empathy.

thebaltimorebeat.com

At a time when many weeklies, and even daily print publications are folding, Baltimore is home to a new weekly newspaper, The Baltimore Beat. We meet editor-in-chief Lisa Snowden-McCray, to learn how it differs from now-defunct City Paper ... as well as what readers can look forward to, and her hopes to increase diversity in the newsroom.

Summer Skyes 11 Creative Commons

Recent Johns Hopkins research suggests the physical activity of 19-year-olds is on par with that of 60 year-olds. The study’s senior author, Vadim Zipunnikov discusses the ramifications of such a sedentary lifestyle, and Julie Lincoln, senior fitness director at the YMCA of Central Maryland, talks about innovative programs that motivate kids to get up and move.

“...It is not if we will experience darkness in a life well lived. It is when.” So writes Dr. Robert Wicks, a psychologist who helps caregivers deal with secondary stress. His new book is “Night Call: Embracing Compassion and Hope in a Troubled World”. We discuss his approach to building resiliency.

Flickr Creative Commons

An estimated 20,000 surgeons in the U.S. are over 70--no more immune than the rest of us from weaker vision, slower hand-eye coordination or forgetfulness. Yet there’s not a clear system for telling a doctor it’s time to retire from surgery. Dr. Mark Katlic, chair of surgery at LifeBridge Health Sinai Hospital, has devised a two-day evaluation to test the physical and mental fitness of surgeons. It's called the Aging Surgeons Program. We also talk with Dr. Herbert Dardik, who resisted the testing but now is a strong proponent. 

Cocaine in your cough drops, tobacco in your toothpaste. Internist Dr. Lydia Kang tells us about mystifying medical practices of yesteryear. Her new book is, “Quackery: A Brief History of the Worst Ways to Cure Everything”.

Here’s a Stoop Story from Kate Hanlon, about her younger sister, their loving mother, and a Nike sweatshirt. You can hear this story and many others at stoopstorytelling.com, as well as the Stoop podcast.

The next live Stoop show is November 16th at 8 pm the Creative Alliance. The theme is, "My Freaky Family". Tickets available here.

Whether it is gathering dust in a drawer or worn every day, nearly every one owns jewelry. And real or fake, this form of ornamentation has a story to tell. Shane Prada, director of the Baltimore Jewelry Center, tells us about a new exhibition, Radical Jewelry Makeover: Baltimore, that takes cast-off pieces and gives them new life. And Artist Mary Fissell describes the appeal of jewelry making.

Radical Jewelry Makeover: Baltimore is on display at the Baltimore Jewelry Center until February 4.

Returning combat veterans often wrestle with post-traumatic stress disorder, the aftermath of brain injuries or chronic pain. Relief can be fleeting. Dr. Carol Bowman, medical director for patient and family-centered care at Veterans Affairs, tells us about holistic therapies used successfully to treat military veterans. We also meet Renee Dixon, executive director of Freedom Hills Therapeutic Riding program in Cecil County, and participant Don Koss, a Vietnam vet, to learn how just being near horses can have a calming effect.

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