Sheilah Kast | WYPR

Sheilah Kast

Host, On The Record

Sheilah Kast is the host of On The Record, Monday-Friday, 9:30-10:00 am.  Originally, she hosted WYPR's  Dupont-Columbia University award-winning Maryland Morning with Sheilah Kast from 2006 - October 2015.  She began her career at The Washington Star, where she covered the Maryland and Virginia legislatures, utilities, energy and taxes, as well as financial and banking regulation.  She learned the craft of broadcasting at ABC News; as a Washington correspondent for fifteen years, she covered the White House, Congress, and the 1991 Moscow coup that signaled the end of the Soviet empire.  Sheilah has been a substitute host on NPR’s Weekend Edition Sunday and The Diane Rehm Show.  She has launched and hosted two weekly interview shows on public TV, one about business and one about challenges facing older people.

Courtesy B'More Clubhouse website

For Tanya Phillips, mental illness made it hard for her to work or to be around others. Then she connected with B’More Clubhouse, a community that focused on her strengths, not her diagnosis. We speak with Tanya, and B’More Clubhouse executive director Jason Woody, about the work the non-profit does to support individuals with mental illness by  allowing them to check their diagnosis at the door, and instead concentrate on building community and developing skills. 

We talk with award-winning journalist Mary Otto about her new book “Teeth: The Story of Beauty, Inequality, and the Struggle for Oral Health in America.” It chronicles the rise of cosmetic dentistry and the marketing of the coveted ‘Hollywood Smile,’ contrasted with decades of deficient access to oral healthcare for many Americans--a gap that still pervades and challenges the system. Otto’s book was spurred by the tragedy of Deamonte Driver in Prince George’s County, who died at age 12 from infection from an abscessed tooth. Otto will be speaking about her book and signing copies for sale at the Samuel D. Harris National Museum of Dentistry, an event co-sponsored with the Public Justice Center and Health Care for the Homeless. You can find out more about the event here, and you can purchase the book here.

Loring Cornish shares a Stoop Story about divine messages he received upon his arrival in Baltimore, that led his art to take on a life of its own. The next live Stoop show is Monday, May 22, with the theme “THE SHOW MUST GO ON!” -- it’s a collaboration with Everyman Theatre. Get tickets here andvisit the Stoop Storytelling site for more stories!

Design Matters

May 19, 2017
Courtesy BMI website

Artist Chris Bathgate wants people to look at everyday objects with a sense of wonder. He believes we often take for granted the iterations of design and the thought process required in the manufacturing of a simple power tool, electronics device, or even a pocket knife. Bathgate, well-known for his precise, elegant industrial-feel sculptures spoke with us about his exhibit at Baltimore Museum of Industry, which is up through March, 2018. He leads a tour of his work May 21. You can find more information about the tour here and about Bathgate's exhibit here

In the spirit of Bike to Work Day, we get a bikeable Baltimore status update from to Liz Cornish, executive director of Bikemore, which advocates for roads that are safer and more accessible for cyclists as well as pedestrians. In the second half of the show, founder and program director Chavi Rhodes and longtime mechanics mentor Lee, from BYKE - Baltimore Youth Kinetic Energy collective, talk about how its teen participants learn personal and professional development through bicycle mechanics and mentoring. For more information about BYKE visit the site here and to learn more about Bike to Work Day and other biking events, check those out at Bikemore.

David Cook / Flickr via Creative Commons

From the shape of the nests birds build to the color of their feathers, technology is turning theories dating back to Darwin on their head. Biologist Jordan Price, of St Mary’s College of Maryland, has mapped the genes of both ancient and more recently derived bird species. He tells us why domed bird nests evolved into the widespread bowl shape, why the color of feathers might be more about camouflage than attraction, and what scientists got wrong when studying the differences between female and male birds.

A safe space to sleep can be lifesaving for infants, but families who are low-income, homeless, or transient may turn to unsafe alternatives - like sharing a bed or using the couch. We hear from Shantell Roberts, who has made it her mission to educate parents about safe-sleeping practices and developed a small, portable option. She is also founder of the nonprofit Touching Young Lives. Plus, Traci Kodeck, president and CEO of the nonprofit HealthCare Access Maryland, tells us about how they connect low-income mothers to services.

When Gov. Hogan declared the surge in heroin and other opioid deaths “a state of emergency,” he put Clay Stamp in charge of the fight. Clay Stamp is senior emergency management adviser to the governor and director of the Opioid Operational Command Center. He tells us what resources have been mobilized by the state of emergency and the prospects for making addiction treatment more available. Check out BeforeIt'sTooLate for information and resources related to the opioid overdose crisis.

Courtesy Wikimedia Commons

Mother’s Day, to a woman who has finally found refuge for herself and her children in a domestic abuse shelter, can be a very emotional time. Bouquets from JWI’s Mother’s Day Flower Project translate into emotional support for women in domestic abuse shelters. Today we speak with JWI vice president Meredith Jacobs, and Naomi Taffet, from CHANA, which provides resources for victims of domestic abuse, shares the stories of some of her clients. To support the flower project visit the JWI website here.

JARC Baltimore / Facebook

Elaine Carroll tells On the Record about a job-training program she directs in Baltimore’s Park Heights neighborhood - the Jane Addams Resource Corporation, JARC. She describes the obstacles trainees face and how JARC Baltimore prepares low-income folks for careers in modern manufacturing.

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