Sheilah Kast

Host, Midday

Sheilah Kast is the host of Midday, Monday-Friday 12-1 pm.  Originally, she hosted WYPR's  Dupont-Columbia University award-winning Maryland Morning with Sheilah Kast from 2006 - October 2015.  She began her career at The Washington Star, where she covered the Maryland and Virginia legislatures, utilities, energy and taxes, as well as financial and banking regulation.  She learned the craft of broadcasting at ABC News; as a Washington correspondent for fifteen years, she covered the White House, Congress, and the 1991 Moscow coup that signaled the end of the Soviet empire.  Sheilah has been a substitute host on NPR’s Weekend Edition Sunday and The Diane Rehm Show.  She has launched and hosted two weekly interview shows on public TV, one about business and one about challenges facing older people.

Ways to Connect

Darren Tunnicliff / Flickr via Creative Commons

How do eating disorders affect the brain? What role do genetics play in determining who is at risk? Dr. Harry Brandt, co-director of the Center for Eating Disorders at Sheppard Pratt, takes us inside the mind of a patient. We’ll find out what parts of the brain are involved in how we feel about food and how we perceive our bodies.

Right now, nearly 4,000 Marylanders are waiting for an organ donation. Some will die waiting. Who should be first in line? What obligation do family members have to become living donors? Should it be legal to buy an organ? How can we be certain donors are giving their organs for the right reasons?

http://401kcalculator.org/Flickr via Creative Commons

If you had no bank account, how would you deposit your paycheck? If you had no credit history, how would you rent an apartment or buy a car? The agency that insures banks, the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) says about 40 percent of Baltimore households are unbanked or underbanked. That means they use check-cashing outlets, money orders, and payday or auto title loans, instead of formal banking services. These alternative services can come with high fees and a reputation for predatory practices.

Kenneth Burns / WYPR

A sea change is coming to the Baltimore City Council: Nearly half the members are not seeking reelection this year. Three of the 15 are retiring, two are vacating their seats to run for mayor, and another is pursuing a judgeship. Luke Broadwater of The Baltimore Sun and WYPR news analyst Fraser Smith join us to discuss the implications.

NPR’s treasured host Diane Rehm is at a crossroads. Late this year, after the election, she plans to stop hosting the interview show she has led for nearly four decades. She doesn’t say she’s retiring, because she intends to stay active in many ways – especially advocating for state legislation to allow doctors to prescribe life-ending medication to mentally competent adults who are terminally ill.

Todd Huffman/Flickr via Creative Commons

Baltimore City’s Police Department fielded 799 citizen complaints against police officers last year. Most were dismissed, and the civilian and the officer never met face-to-face. Soon they’ll have that chance. The city is launching a voluntary mediation program.

In his second State of the State address yesterday, Governor Hogan struck a tone of bipartisanship. But Democratic leaders say the governor’s rhetoric doesn’t match his budget. WYPR reporter Rachel Baye joins us to recap what we’ve seen so far in the 2016 assembly. Plus, are one man’s burdensome regulations, a woman’s inalienable protections?

Johnathan Nightingale/Flickr via Creative Commons

Maryland’s Eastern Shore has a lot of chickens...and enough chicken manure to fill M&T Bank Stadium twice every year. That manure is a major Chesapeake Bay pollutant. Last summer Governor Hogan enacted a regulation that restricts how much chicken litter farmers can spread on fields. Now advocates are supporting legislation that would place the burden of disposing of that extra manure on poultry companies, taking farmers and taxpayers out of the equation.

Aggression, insomnia, headaches, and even seizures. A traumatic brain injury can have life-altering consequences for individuals and their families. Today we’ll hear from Dr. Sandeep Vaishnavi, a neuropsychiatrist at Duke University Medical Center and the co-author of "The Traumatized Brain: A Family Guide to Understanding Mood, Memory, and Behavior after Brain Injury," published by John Hopkins University Press. We'll met Tom and Mary Longest, a husband and wife who struggled to adjust to their "new normal" after an accident. And we speak to Dr.

Eduardo Perez / U.S. Customs and Border Protection

A flood, a surge, an influx. In 2014, headline writers struggled to convey the massive number of Central American children crossing the border into the United States. Those headlines have faded, but the kids are still coming. In fact, we are likely on the cusp of a new, equally large wave of unaccompanied minors from El Salvador, Guatemala, and Honduras. As in the previous surge, many of these children are coming to Maryland.

Pages