Sheilah Kast | WYPR

Sheilah Kast

Host, On The Record

Sheilah Kast is the host of On The Record, Monday-Friday, 9:30-10:00 am.  Originally, she hosted WYPR's  Dupont-Columbia University award-winning Maryland Morning with Sheilah Kast from 2006 - October 2015.  She began her career at The Washington Star, where she covered the Maryland and Virginia legislatures, utilities, energy and taxes, as well as financial and banking regulation.  She learned the craft of broadcasting at ABC News; as a Washington correspondent for fifteen years, she covered the White House, Congress, and the 1991 Moscow coup that signaled the end of the Soviet empire.  Sheilah has been a substitute host on NPR’s Weekend Edition Sunday and The Diane Rehm Show.  She has launched and hosted two weekly interview shows on public TV, one about business and one about challenges facing older people.

Steve Walker shares a Stoop story about a broken drive shaft, a pretty girl, and a large chocolate milkshake. You can listen to more stories and learn about Stoop shows at stoopstorytelling.com.

One scoop or two? Cup or cone? You can’t go wrong with ice cream--whether it’s plain vanilla or an exotic mélange of candy and fudge. From the birth of the ice cream truck to the origin of the root beer float, we get a pop culture history of this delectable dessert from Amy Ettinger, author of the new book, "Sweet Spot: An Ice Cream Binge Across America".

Vital Signs 15 Housing & Community Development Maps / BNIA

Why is it important for each Baltimore neighborhood to understand the dozens of statistics that describe it and its people--where they live, how long it takes them to get work, how many of the homes around them are vacant? We ask Seema Iyer of the University of Baltimore, driving force behind the Baltimore Neighborhood Indicators Alliance, how such data can predict where things are going, not just trace the past. And we ask consultant Alyce Myatt about GeoLoom, a new interactive map that tracks elements of art and culture in every corner of the city.

Whether you are lazing by the pool or passing time at the airport, summer is a great time to get lost in a good book. Deborah Taylor of the Enoch Pratt Free Library shares selections that appeal to adults--thrillers, memoirs, and more. And Jamie Watson of the Baltimore County Public Library has ideas for books to catch the interest of children, teens, and reluctant readers.

Think again if you’ve been assuming curiosity is constant, like gravity. We talk to astrophysicist Mario Livio about his new book, "Why: What Makes us Curious". Not only are some people more curious than others, and curious about different questions, but homo sapiens’ capacity for curiosity grew as its brain evolved. For all its variations, Livio deems curiosity an unstoppable drive.

Hamza Butt / Flickr via Creative Commons

Many families get sticker shock when they look at the cost of college - a number that doesn’t even take into account textbooks or trips home for the holidays. Money magazine senior writer Kim Clark walks us through why the cost of college keeps rising, as well as what to do when a financial aid package doesn’t measure up. Plus, a new ranking looks at which schools do the best job of moving low-income students into the middle class. Which colleges in Maryland made the list?

Now, a Stoop Story from former Baltimore City Councilman Joseph "Jody" Landers, about the constant commotion of growing up in Northeast Baltimore in a family of eight. You can find his story and others at Stoop Storytelling, as well as information about upcoming Stoop events and the show’s podcast.

Open Society Institute-Baltimore is supplying the city’s health department funds for another front in the fight against the opioid epidemic. The $200,000 grant is aimed at saving lives from overdose and reducing stigma around addiction. We speak to OSI director Diana Morris about what activities the grant will fund and how she'll measure the success of this investment.

The impact a crime has upon a victim can be pervasive -- the trauma can affect children, parents, other loved ones and friends. Comprehending the victim’s point of view and the depth of that widespread impact can be a powerful healing tool for both the perpetrator and the victim. We meet Wayne Brewton, convicted of murder at age 17 with a life sentence, and paroled after 38 years, who championed victim awareness efforts inside prison, and Mark Vernarelli, Director of Community Engagement in the Maryland Division of Parole and Probation, who witnessed the powerful effects of the efforts first hand.

For 90 years, The League for People with Disabilities has worked to foster independence for those living with physical, cognitive or neurological handicaps. Annually, more than 2-thousand individuals get resources, care and rehabilitation at its multiple facilities. We’ll speak with Peris Bennett, about his experiences as a participant in the League’s workforce development program and David Greenberg, the League's president and CEO. He offers insight behind the enthusiastic response to their monthly nightclub for people with disabilities, Club 1111.

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