Tom Hall | WYPR

Tom Hall

Host

Host, Midday  (M-F 12:00-1:00)

In the Bromo (3rd Friday of the month at 4:44)
What are You Reading? (4th Friday of the month, at 4:44) 

Tom Hall joined the WYPR staff as the Host of Choral Arts Classics in 2003.  After 10 years as the Culture Editor and then host of Maryland Morning, in September, 2016, Tom became the host of Midday, the highly rated news and public policy program that features interviews with elected officials, community leaders, and thought provoking authors, artists, researchers, journalists, and scholars from around the world. 

Tom is also the Host of In the Bromo and What Are You Reading? on WYPR.  In addition, he has served as the host of the Maryland Morning Screen Test, and the WYPR/MD Film Festival Spotlight Series.  In 2006, as the Music Director of the Baltimore Choral Arts Society, Tom received an Emmy Award for Christmas with Choral Arts, a special that aired on WMAR television, the ABC affiliate in Maryland, for 21 years.  He has been a guest co-host of Maryland Public Television’s Art Works, and in 2007, he was named “Best New Broadcast Journalist” by the Maryland Chapter of the Society of Professional Journalists. In 2009, the Baltimore City Paper named him "Best Local Radio Personality." In 2016 and again in 2017, he was recognized as "Best Talk Show Host" in the Baltimore Magazine Reader's Poll. 

Tom is invited frequently to speak to professional and community organizations, including the Oregon Bach Festival, the American Choral Directors Association, Chorus America, the College Endowment Association, the Baltimore Broadcaster’s Coalition, The Johns Hopkins Brain Science Institute, the Johns Hopkins Community Conversations Series, and the Creative Alliance.  He has moderated panels and given presentations at the Baltimore City Lit Festival, the Baltimore Book Festival, the Baltimore Museum of Art, the Walters Art Museum, the University of Maryland, the Enoch Pratt Library, and MICA. He has also moderated Mayoral Debates, panels at Light City in Baltimore, and at the Stevenson University Speakers Series.

He appears each year as the moderator of the Rosenberg-Blaustein Distinguished Artist Recital Series at Goucher College.  His publications include articles in the Baltimore Sun, Style Magazine, and Baltimore Magazine, as well as many scholarly music journals, and he is the co-author of The Bach Passions in Our Time:  Contending with the Legacy of Antisemitism, published on-line by the Institute for Islamic Christian and Jewish Studies.  Tom was appointed the Music Director Emeritus of the Baltimore Choral Arts Society in 2017.

Tom Hall lives in Baltimore, with his wife, Linell Smith.  Their daughter, Miranda, is a playwright, based in Washington, DC.

Baltimore Center Stage

The Christians, directed by Hana S. Sharif and written by Lucas Hnath, is set is a modern day Megachurch; the play explores what happens when the church's spiritual leader, Pastor Paul (played by Howard W. Overshown) stops believing in hell. The production features performances from local choirs including Greater Baltimore Church of Christ Choir, New Psalmist Baptist Church Choir and Community Choir of Baltimore Center Stage, a choir convened for this production. Center Stage transformed their theater for this production to look and feel like a church, audiences are invited to participate in the production as members of the congregation. 

Josie Lepe/Bay Area News Group Archives

Should Colin Kaepernick be playing in the NFL this season? Does the fact that he’s not playing have to do with how well he plays, or his sideline protests against police misconduct? Is a movement to boycott the NFL in support of Kaepernick, catching on?   

If you haven’t been boycotting the games, what do you think of the Ravens first two outings this year? The defense is hot, and the offense is hot enough to win. How will their trip across the pond to play in London on Sunday affect their performance in the coming weeks? While the Ravens head to England, the Orioles are headed south, in the standings.  What happened to a team that showed so much promise, so many times, this year? LaTasha Miles is a sports writer and commentator and the author of the book, When Football Season Turns You into His Side Chick Mark Hyman, is Midday’s Sports Guru who joins us regularly. He’s on the sports management faculty at George Washington University, and he’s the author of several books, including Concussions and Our Kids: America’s Leading Expert on How to Protect Young Athletes and Keep Sports Safe, which he wrote with Dr. Robert Cantu. Milton Kent joins on the phone. He's the host of Sports at Large on WYPR; he also serves on the faculty of the School of Global Journalism and Communication at Morgan State University.

AFP Photo/SCOTT OLSON

 

Protests in St. Louis continued last night following the acquittal of a white, former police officer, Jason Stockley, in the 2011 shooting death of black man, Anthony Lamar Smith. A recording device inside the former officer's vehicle captured Stockley saying he was “going to kill” Smith during a high speed pursuit. Prosecutors also accused Stockley of planting a gun inside of Smith's car after he was fatally wounded. Peaceful protestors marched through the city immediately after the verdict was announced, but by Friday evening, pockets of the protest erupted in violence.

marylandreporter.com

In the 1960's, the iconic developer and visionary Jim Rouse was inspired to create a new kind of city, one that was integrated and economically diverse, and which offered amenities like green space, recreation, and outstanding schools.  The result was Columbia, Md., which Money magazine called "the best small city to live in America."

Len Lazarick, editor and publisher of the website of MarylandReporter.com and resident of Columbia for over 40 years, joins us in studio to talk about his latest book Columbia at 50: A Memoir of a City.

Amy Davis

In 1950, when Baltimore’s population was at its peak, there were 119 movie theaters in Baltimore City. Today, there are five. Amy Davis has photographed more than 70 of Baltimore’s often neglected old movie theaters. In some cases, like the Hippodrome or the Stavros Niarchos Foundation Parkway, the theaters have been lovingly restored. In other instances, only a shell or remnants of the buildings exist, and in several cases, the buildings have been razed. In telling the stories of these theaters and what happened to them along the way, Amy Davis has compiled a history not only of the theaters, but of Baltimore itself. The book is called Flickering Treasures: Rediscovering Baltimore’s Forgotten Movie Theaters.

Meghan Picerno

Sep 15, 2017

Tom talks with Meghan Picerno, who stars as Christine in Love Never Dies.

City of St. Petersburg

On this edition of the the Midday News Wrap:  An IED explosion rocks  the Parsons Green tube station in Southwest London during rush hour this morning leaving 23 people hospitalized.  It is the fifth act of terrorism in Britain this year.  The death toll from Hurricane Irma continues to rise as clean-up continues.  At least 39 people on the U.S. mainland, and at least 43 people in the Caribbean have died as a result of Irma.   

On Wednesday night, Democratic leaders Nancy Pelosi and Chuck Schumer issued a statement saying they a reached an agreement about DACA, the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program.  The President, however, tweeted on Thursday morning that there was no deal.  Also, the Department of Justice said this week that none of the Baltimore Police officers who were charged in the 2015 death of Freddie Gray will face federal civil rights charges in his death.   Discussing these issues and more,  Tom is joined by Michael Fletcher  of ESPN's The Undefeated and Andrew Revkin, senior reporter for climate and related issues at ProPublica.  

JHU Press

A new book from Johns Hopkins University Press chronicles the rich history of music in Maryland, from drinking songs in colonial Annapolis through the legacy of jazz greats like Charlie Byrd, who coincidentally, ended his storied career in our state capital. The book is called Musical Maryland: A History of Song and Performance from the Colonial Period to the Age of Radio. Authors Elizabeth Schaaf and David Hildebrand join Tom to explore the history of music in Maryland. 

Elizabeth Schaaf is the former archivist at the Peabody Institute. David Hildebrand is a scholar and performer who is the Director of the Colonial Music Institute.  

Everyman Theatre

Everyman Theatre's adaptation of the Tony Award winning play M. Butterfly stars Vichet Chum as Song and Bruce Randolph Nelson as Rene Gallimard. The Emmy award winning drama written by David Henry Hwang is based on the true story of the French diplomat who had a nearly two-decade affair with a Chinese opera performer and spy. The production is directed by Vincent Lancisi. 

M. Butterfly is at The Everyman Theatre through October 8th.

HBO

 

In another edition of Living Questions, our monthly series on the role of religion in the public sphere, which we produce in collaboration with the Institute for Islamic, Christian and Jewish Studies, we take a look at depictions of religious faiths in movies and on television.

A lot has changed since Charlton Heston  starred as Moses in the 1956 film The Ten Commandments. Show’s like Greenleaf on OWN take us behind the scenes at a Black Mega Church; HBO’s The Young Pope imagines an insurgent named Lenny Belardo rising to the Pontificate. How do these, and a host of other TV shows and movies feed our perceptions and even skepticism around organized religion? How does a movie like Silence, which tells the story of 17th century Jesuit Priests in Japan, help us understand religion in a historical context? How are we to appreciate the complexities of various faith traditions if directors and writers take artistic liberties in their story-telling?  

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