Tom Hall | WYPR

Tom Hall

Host

Host, Midday  (M-F 12:00-1:00)

In the Bromo (3rd Friday of the month at 4:44)
What are You Reading? (4th Friday of the month, at 4:44) 

Tom Hall joined the WYPR staff as the Host of Choral Arts Classics in 2003.  After 10 years as the Culture Editor and then host of Maryland Morning, in September, 2016, Tom became the host of Midday, the highly rated news and public policy program that features interviews with elected officials, community leaders, and thought provoking authors, artists, researchers, journalists, and scholars from around the world. 

Tom is also the Host of In the Bromo and What Are You Reading? on WYPR.  In addition, he has served as the host of the Maryland Morning Screen Test, and the WYPR/MD Film Festival Spotlight Series.  In 2006, as the Music Director of the Baltimore Choral Arts Society, Tom received an Emmy Award for Christmas with Choral Arts, a special that aired on WMAR television, the ABC affiliate in Maryland, for 21 years.  He has been a guest co-host of Maryland Public Television’s Art Works, and in 2007, he was named “Best New Broadcast Journalist” by the Maryland Chapter of the Society of Professional Journalists. In 2009, the Baltimore City Paper named him "Best Local Radio Personality." In 2016 and again in 2017, he was recognized as "Best Talk Show Host" in the Baltimore Magazine Reader's Poll. 

Tom is invited frequently to speak to professional and community organizations, including the Oregon Bach Festival, the American Choral Directors Association, Chorus America, the College Endowment Association, the Baltimore Broadcaster’s Coalition, The Johns Hopkins Brain Science Institute, the Johns Hopkins Community Conversations Series, and the Creative Alliance.  He has moderated panels and given presentations at the Baltimore City Lit Festival, the Baltimore Book Festival, the Baltimore Museum of Art, the Walters Art Museum, the University of Maryland, the Enoch Pratt Library, and MICA. He has also moderated Mayoral Debates, panels at Light City in Baltimore, and at the Stevenson University Speakers Series.

He appears each year as the moderator of the Rosenberg-Blaustein Distinguished Artist Recital Series at Goucher College.  His publications include articles in the Baltimore Sun, Style Magazine, and Baltimore Magazine, as well as many scholarly music journals, and he is the co-author of The Bach Passions in Our Time:  Contending with the Legacy of Antisemitism, published on-line by the Institute for Islamic Christian and Jewish Studies.  Tom was appointed the Music Director Emeritus of the Baltimore Choral Arts Society in 2017.

Tom Hall lives in Baltimore, with his wife, Linell Smith.  Their daughter, Miranda, is a playwright, based in Washington, DC.

John Stefaniuk

22 hours ago

On this week's In the Bromo, Tom talks with John Stefaniuk, Associate Director of The Lion King

On this edition of the Midday News Wrap, we speak to  NPR Justice Correspondent Carrie Johnson, Baltimore Sun Opinion Editor Andy Green and longtime columnist Barry  Rascovar about  several news stories including,  Sen. Al Franken’s apology for sexual harassing a reporter 12 years ago, the tax code revision passed by the House yesterday, and the status of the Senate plan, now that it’s tied to repealing the individual mandate of the Affordable Care Act. 

The News Wrap begins with some context on Jeff Sessions’ testimony this week to the House Judiciary Committee, the on-going Russia investigation, and the special election in Alabama. NPR Justice Correspondent Carrie Johnson joins us from the studios of NPR in Washington.  

 

Here in Baltimore, Police Detective Sean Suiter, a 43 year old father of five children, died yesterday from injuries he received when he was shot on Wednesday afternoon in Harlem Park while investigating another murder that had taken place in this violence-ridden neighborhood.   There has been a verdict in the Trial Board Hearing for Lt. Brian Rice, the highest ranking officer involved in the arrest and death of Freddie Gray in 2015.  He has been cleared of all charges. 

Later in the show, Tom speaks with WYPR’s Dominique Maria Bonessi, who was at the University of Baltimore this morning when the Rice verdict was announced.

For those of us who may overindulge between Thanksgiving and New Year’s, it’s not always easy to stick to a workout routine or diet, especially if we’re traveling or going to parties at the office or in the neighborhood.  Just in time for Thanksgiving, we’ll talk about best practices for fending off those extra holiday pounds. 

Julia Ngo is a BodyPump Group Fitness instructor. She teaches at the Downtown Athletic Club; and at the Merritt Athletic Club in Canton. Sam Bassi is an exercise specialist and personal trainer at the DAC and elsewhere.  Tamarra Fleming Wimbish, aka Diva T, owns and operates a fitness studio called Diva T Fitness or DTF Studio & Rental Venue in Parkville. She’s a licensed  personal trainer and Zumba instructor. She also teaches Cranked Up Cardio, an aerobic dance program that uses Baltimore Club Music. 

photo by Richard Anderson

It's Thursday, and that means our peripatetic theater critic, J. Wynn Rousuck, joins Tom in Studio A for our weekly look at the region's thespian offerings.  Today, Judy reviews Shakespeare in Love, the new stage version of the multi-Oscar winning 1998 film that's now on the boards at Baltimore Center Stage.  Adapted by Lee Hall from ​from Marc Norman's and Tom Stoppard’s original screenplay, Shakespeare in Love is a funny, bawdy back-story take on the famous Bard's creative muse, and on the complex relationship between art and love.

Pixabay

A student is suspended from the University of Tulsa for statements his husband made on Facebook; posters advertising “Straight Pride Week” ordered removed from bulletin boards at Youngstown State University. A law professor is asked to resign when she wears blackface to a Halloween party, to promote a conversation about race. Today on Midday, a conversation about free speech on college campuses. Are trigger warnings and safe spaces in higher education stifling intellectual thought and violating the first amendment or creating intellectually diverse and inclusive campuses? 

On this edition of Midday we focus on a particular group of immigrants, who are affected by immigration policy in ways unlike any other group.  Black African Immigrants are the fasting growing immigrant population in the United States.  According to PEW research, there was a 137% surge in the Black African Immigrant population between 2000 and 2013.  10% of all Blacks living in the United States are foreign born, up from 3% in the 1980s. 

They are a population that is often highly educated, family oriented and hardworking, all virtues that from the cornerstone of the American value system. So why do these Black immigrants face the highest levels of deportation, and unemployment?

We take a look at the challenges that Black African immigrants face as they strive to lay roots in this country and how the eradication of programs like DACA and the Diversity Visa Program affect their prosperity.

Creative Commons

Now, a look at how Marylanders are trying to make sure they have health insurance.  Open Enrollment through the Maryland Health Connection began on the first of November.  In previous years, the enrollment period has lasted 3 months.  This year, the enrollment period is only half that long.  It ends next month, on December 15th. 

With about a month to go, we thought it would be a good idea to check-in on how enrollment is going so far.  Tom's guest in Studio A is Dr. Howard Haft.  He’s the Interim Executive Director of the Maryland Health Benefits Exchange, which runs Maryland Health Connection.Gov, the website where people shop and sign-up for health and dental plans.

Creative Commons

Now, a conversation about the challenges posed by caregiving. 

Forty-two million Americans -- one in four adults -- is currently shouldering the enormous responsibility of caring for an aging relative.  Here in Maryland, more than 770,000 people have assumed the role of caregiver for their parents, grandparents, or family friends, either at home or elsewhere.

What toll is this taking on the caregivers?  Can they find the resources and services to cope with the emotional, physical, and financial stress of caregiving?  We asked two experts in the field to join us with some answers.

Amy Goyer is a specialist on Aging, Family and Caregiving at AARP in Washington.   She’s the author of “Juggling Life, Work and Caregiving,” in which she tells the story of her caring for her parents and her sister.  She joins Tom this afternoon on the line from NPR studios in New York.

Dorinda Adams is the Program Manager in the Office of Adult Services in the Maryland Department of Human Services.  She also helps direct the Maryland Caregivers Commission.  She joins Tom in Studio A.

AP Photo

In this edition of the Midday News Wrap, we focus on the status of the Republican plan to overhaul the tax code. The GOP-controlled House and Senate have hammered together separate plans that propose a $1.5 trillion tax cut, but with a different set of rates, different deductions and on a different timetable.  Democrats, and not just a few Republicans, reject both plans as tax windfalls for the rich that assault America's middle class and threaten the poor. 

To help us sort out some of the key parts and operating principles of the GOP tax plans, we turn to Marshall Steinbaum , Research Director and a senior fellow at the Roosevelt Institute, an economic think tank based in New York.  Mr. Steinbaum joins Tom from NPR studios in Washington DC.  

Associated Press Photo

President Donald Trump is in the final stretch of his marathon, 12-day swing through Asia that has taken him to Japan, South Korea and China. He arrived in Vietnam Friday, and over the weekend  he travels to the Philippines for a regional security summit, before heading back to Washington Tuesday. 

The often-bombastic US president toned down his rhetoric against North Korea during his diplomatic tour, stating in Seoul, South Korea, that America was not seeking "conflict or confrontation."  Mr. Trump also presented a far softer side during his two days in China, the world's number-two economic power, where he arrived to much pomp and circumstance.  As President Xi asserts his power within China and around the world, is President Trump's new welcoming approach to Beijing a diplomatic masterstroke or something less ?   

Weston Konishi joins us in Studio A.  He’s a Senior Fellow at the Maureen and Mike Mansfield Foundation in Washington, D.C.   

Also joining the conversation is Matthew Pennington.   He reports from Washington on US-Asian affairs for the Associated Press, and formerly served as the AP’s correspondent in Southeast Asia, Pakistan and Afghanistan.  He joins us from the AP's Washington studios.

Photo courtesy Peabody Institute

Tom's guest today is celebrating a homecoming, of sorts.  Since receiving his artist diploma in conducting from The Peabody Institute eight years ago, conductor Joseph Young has appeared with orchestras throughout the US and around the world.   Now, he’s back in Baltimore, and back at Peabody, but he’s not a student this time.  He’s the newly appointed Director of Ensembles at the world renowned conservatory. 

He’s conducting one of those ensembles, the Peabody Chamber Orchestra, in a concert tomorrow night at Peabody's Griswold Hall at 8:00pm, in a program that will include music by Bach, Ravel and Haydn.  Click here for details about this free concert.  But right now, Joseph Young is Tom's guest in Studio A...

Photo courtesy Ira Forman

Today it's another edition of Living Questions, our monthly series on religion in the public sphere, produced in collaboration with the Institute for Islamic, Christian and Jewish Studies.

We focus today on the persistent problem of anti-Semitism.  Acts of bigotry and intolerance toward the Jewish community in the US are on the rise, with a particular spike after the Unite the Right rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, this summer.  There have been 60 more incidents in our region this year than occurred in 2016.  And we’re not talking about anonymous trolls on the internet.  These are physical incidents of bullying and vandalism, which often take place on school and college campuses. 

Tom's guest on today's Living Questions segment is Ira Forman, a distinguished visiting professor at Georgetown University and senior fellow at the University's Center for Jewish Civilization. Professor Forman, who has worked for more than forty years as a leading advocate for Jewish culture and community, is currently teaching a course in Contemporary Anti-Semitism.  Previously, he spent four years as the State Department’s Special Envoy to Monitor and Combat Anti-Semitism.  Forman and most other Obama political appointees were asked to resign their positions this past January by the incoming Trump Administration; the Special Envoy post is still vacant.  What does that vacancy signal about current U.S. engagement in programs to combat anti-Semitism? What has the US Government traditionally done and what should it be doing at home and abroad to stop the curse of religious intolerance?  

Photo by Jim Preston

Theater critric J.Wynn Rousuck joins us in Studio A every Thursday with a review of one of the region's thespian offerings, and this week, she tells us about a new production of Origin of the Species now on stage at Strand Theater Company in Baltimore.

St. Martin's Press

In jurisdictions throughout Maryland, in New Jersey and in Virginia, and elsewhere yesterday, Democrats picked up wins in Mayor’s offices, Governor’s Mansions and State Houses. At the top of the Virginia ticket, Democratic Lt. Governor Ralph Northam walloped former RNC Chair Ed Gillespie by nine points, in a race that many around the country saw as a referendum on the Presidency of Donald Trump.

It was on this day, November 8th, one year ago, that Trump shocked the world when he completed his transition from campaign joke to President- elect. We are marking that anniversary today with a conversation with E.J. Dionne and Norman Ornstein, two of America’s most astute and respected political observers who are also the authors of a persuasive and insightful new book.

The book is called One Nation After Trump: A Guide for the Perplexed, the Disillusioned, the Desperate and the Not-Yet Deported. They wrote it with Thomas Mann of the University of California and the Brookings Institution.

E.J. Dionne is a senior fellow at Brookings, a syndicated columnist at The Washington Post and a visiting professor at Harvard University.

Norm Ornstein is a resident scholar at the American Enterprise Institute and a contributing columnist and editor at the Atlantic and the National Journal. They joined Tom from a studio at Harvard University in Cambridge, Mass.

Centers for Disease Control

To date, more than 60 women have accused Hollywood producer Harvey Weinstein of sexual misconduct. The accusations range from indecent exposure to rape. A new piece in the New Yorker written by Ronan Farrow alleges that Weinstein hired private investigators to collect information on his accusers and the journalists who tried to expose him in an effort to suppress stories about his predatory behavior.  

In the days after the New York Times published the initial story on Weinstein detailing a few of the allegations, more people came forward with sexual assault allegations against other powerful men in Hollywood including producer James Toback and actor Kevin Spacey. At least 60 women have accused Bill Cosby of sexual assault; a majority of those accusations came to light in 2014 and 2015. The trial in one of those cases ended in a mistrial earlier this year. 

photo by Kenneth K. Lam - Baltimore Sun

We begin with a look at the Baltimore Police Department's trial board hearing that's considering, in the first of three administrative proceedings, whether disciplinary action should be taken against Officer Cesar Goodson, Jr., one of six officers indicted in the arrest and death of Freddie Gray in 2015.  He drove the van that transported Mr. Gray.  Goodson was acquitted of the charges, including one for second-degree "depraved heart" murder, brought against him by State’s Attorney Marilyn Mosby.  But last week and again today (Monday), he sat before a three-member panel engaged by the Police Department to determine whether or not his actions merit disciplinary action.

Of the six police officers originally charged in the Freddie Gray case, just three face trial board hearings: Goodson,  Lt. Brian Rice (tried and acquitted) and Sgt. Alicia White (charges dropped).  Trial boards for Rice and White are expected to begin, respectively, later this month and  sometime in December.  Officers Garrett Miller (charges dropped) and Edward Nero (tried and acquitted) chose to receive one-week suspensions rather than face the trial boards.  A sixth officer involved in the Freddie Gray case, William Porter (charges dropped), faces no discipline.

David Jaros is on the faculty of the University of Baltimore Law School.  Debbie Hines is an attorney in private practice in Washington.  They both paid very close attention to Officer Goodson’s criminal trial last year.  They join Tom in the studio to talk about what the trial board hearings say about the ability of the Baltimore Police department to police itself, and whether these disciplinary proceedings can restore community trust in the force.

Last week, CSX Transportation shocked the Hogan administration and local officials by withdrawing its support for an expansion of the Howard Street Tunnel. What does that decision mean for the city and for the Port of Baltimore? And, what does it mean for the current tunnel, which was built in the 1890s? It was the site of a large chemical fire after a 60 train-car pile-up, which did severe damage to underground infrastructure, 16 years ago.    

 Colin Campbell is a reporter for the Baltimore Sun who wrote about CSX's decision to tank the tunnel plans.  David Warnock is the co-founder of Camden Partners, a venture capital firm, and a former candidate for Mayor. They join Tom to talk about the Howard Street tunnel. 

Kamau High, managing editor of The Afro-American newspaper, joins Tom to talk about the local stories his newsroom is covering. There have been some changes in the leadership of the local chapter of the NAACP, and a racially-charged controversy erupted last week, when some students at local private schools dressed up as Freddie Gray for Halloween. 

Jim Lo Scalzo - Shutterstock

The Republicans have proposed a sweeping overhaul to the tax code. Some of the changes involve deductions that have been baked into the cake of the code for generations, and the impact on the deficit is huge.  The President called for the death penalty for the man accused of killing 8 and wounding 12 in New York.  An excerpt from former interim DNC chair Donna Brazile's book is complicating matters for the Democratic Party as they continue to strategize an opposition to the Trump Administration.

Eugene Scott reports on politics and identity for the Washington Post politics blog, The Fix. He joins Tom to discuss the news of the week. 

Aaron Nah/Bush Chicken

For this portion of the Newswrap, Tom focuses on several major news developments on the African continent. 

Contentious presidential elections in Liberia and Kenya have dominated recent headlines, as results in both contests have been tainted by allegations of fraud. As Liberia attempts its first nonviolent transition to power in over seven decades, its Supreme Court has been the linchpin to peace, amid accusations of bribery and intimidation. 

In Kenya, while the courts have tried to uphold the electoral process, they have not been able to avert bloodshed: nearly 30 people have died during election-related protests, ethnic violence, and clashes with police.  

Finally, an examination of the situations in Niger and the Sahel, where four Green Berets were killed during US military operations, ostensibly in support of local anti-terrorism forces.  

Emira Woods is an Associate Fellow at the Institute for Policy Studies, a progressive think tank that works on social and economic justice issues. She joins Tom for an update on Africa. 

Photo Courtesy Full Circle Dance Company

We're going to take a look now at how creative artists are addressing a very serious and longstanding problem.  Domestic violence affects nearly one in four women.  According to The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and The National Institute of Justice, 22% of women experience at least one physical assault by a partner during their adulthood.

The Full Circle Dance Company has drawn on the stories of women affected by domestic violence to inspire their latest collaboration: a benefit performance this weekend called "Unshamed: Baring Our Secrets and Our Souls."

Joining Tom in Studio A to talk about the benefit performance -- and the difficult issue it's addressing --  is Donna Jacobs, the Artistic Director of Full Circle Dance Company, who is also a Senior Vice President at the University of Maryland Medical System

Dr. Carnell Cooper joins Tom as well.  He is an associate professor of surgery and the director of the Center for Injury Prevention and Policy at the R. Adams Cowley Shock Trauma Center at the University of Maryland Medical Center.

The Full Circle Dance Company performs "Unshamed: Baring Our Secrets and Our Souls" at the Chesapeake Arts Center in Brooklyn Park, Maryland. on Saturday, November 4 at 7:30pm, and on Sunday, November 5 at 2:30pm.  A portion of all ticket proceeds will be donated to the Bridge Domestic Violence Program at UMMS.   Click here for directions and ticket info. 

AM Joy

Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s Russia investigation now includes two indictments and a guilty plea. Writing yesterday in Vanity Fair Magazine, Gabriel Sherman reports that Steve Bannon is now openly worried about Donald Trump being impeached or removed under the 25th amendment, and that Bannon fears a revolt by some members of the cabinet, and the Republican establishment.

All of this is, of course, music to the ears of the Progressive Left. But should impeachment efforts form the fundament of the Trump resistance movement? Progressives, and many conservatives, for that matter, agree that Trump is unfit to serve in the highest office in the land. But what else do they agree on? Is there consensus about health care, tax policy, or counter-terrorism? What do Democrats stand for besides standing against Trump?

Tom's guest today is Joy-Ann Reid,  host of AM Joy on MSNBC, where she is also a political analyst. She is the author of the book "Fracture: Barack Obama, The Clintons and the Racial Divide," which was published in 2015, with an update in the summer of 2016. She co-edited "We Are the Change We Seek: The Speeches of Barack Obama," with E.J. Dionne of the Washington Post. That book was published earlier this year.

Joy-Ann Reid speaks at Johns Hopkins University tonight at 8 pm. Her topic:  journalism in the age of fake news.  Click here for more information.

Photo by ClintonBPhotography

It's Thursday, and that means theater critic J. Wynn Rousuck joins Tom with her weekly review of one of the region's many thespian offerings.   Today, she talks about Everyman Theatre's new production of Intimate Apparel, a play that premiered in 2003 at Baltimore's Center Stage.  It's a contemporary work written in classic style by Lynn Nottage, the first female playwright to win two Pulitzers.  

Inspired by a true story, Intimate Apparel centers on Esther (played by Dawn Ursula), a self-employed African American seamstress in turn-of-the-century New York who is working hard - and saving her money - making beautiful undergarments for her well-to-do clientele.  But she dreams of a grander life, while nurturing her fondness for a Jewish fabric merchant (played by Drew Kopas). As an emotionally wrenching turn of events puts Esther’s dreams at risk, the play explores the tenacity of the human spirit against the powerful pressures of class, race and culture. 

The play is directed by Tazewell Thompson.

Intimate Apparel continues at Everyman Theatre through Sunday, November 19th.

Melissa Archer, MD Dept. of Housing & Community Development

At a packed Baltimore City Council hearing last week, housing advocates and others lent their support to a resolution put forward by Baltimore City Councilwoman Mary Pat Clarke, which calls on the city to revive the Dollar House program of the 1970s and early 80s:  Back then, the city sold more than 180 abandoned houses for $1 apiece, and helped the buyers with financing and renovation assistance.     

Clarke, a Democrat, has represented the 14th District on the Baltimore City Council since 2004.  From 1987-95, she was president of the City Council, the first woman ever elected to that position.  She ran unsuccessfully for mayor in 1995.

Clarke joined Tom today in Studio A. Later, Jay Brodie and Mike Posko joined the conversation.  Brodie was the commissioner of the city’s Housing Department from 1977 to 1984.  After that, he served as the president of the Baltimore Development Corp, the city’s quasi-public economic development arm. He did that for 16 years, serving under four mayors, until his retirement in 2012.  Posko is the CEO of Habitat for Humanity of the Chesapeake. Over the past 35 years, Habitat has built or renovated more than 700 homes throughout Central Maryland.

NASA

Jeffrey Kluger joins Tom in Studio A to talk about his latest book, Apollo 8: The Thrilling Story of the First Mission to the Moon, in which he makes the case that Apollo 8's historic orbital flyby of the Moon -- the first human venture beyond the bounds of close-Earth orbit -- was as important, if not more important, than the later mission, Apollo 11, that actually landed men on the lunar surface.

Kluger has been a science editor and senior writer for Time Magazine for more than two decades.  He’s the author of eight other works of fiction and non-fiction, plus some books for young readers.

He grew up in Pikesville, and he’s back in town for a reading of Apollo 8: The Thrilling Story Of The First Mission To The Moon  this evening at The Ivy Bookshop in North Baltimore at 7 pm.  

Baltimore City Office of the Mayor

  

Today a conversation with Baltimore City Mayor Catherine Pugh. She assumed office 11 months ago, and has undertaken a number of new initiatives in the areas of violence reduction and economic development. Earlier this month, Baltimore submitted a bid along with several cities across the continent to become the home of Amazon's second headquarters. A couple of weeks ago, the mayor and Governor Larry Hogan announced the next phase of the “North Avenue Rising” project, a $27 million dollar effort to improve transit and pedestrian options along North Avenue. Now that the mayor has chosen the members of the Civilian Oversight Taskforce, we'll talk about the status of the Baltimore Police Department's consent decree with the Justice Department; and the mayor's plan to curb violence in the city as the city mourns its 296th homicide this year.  

We'll also talk about the mayor's plan to help the estimated 2,600 people experiencing homelessness in Baltimore. Some advocates for the homeless say that the city isn’t addressing homelessness in a meaningful way. Last week, the mayor said it might cost as much as $350 million to end homelessness in the city. 

Photo courtesy npr.org

On Monday, the office of Special Counsel Robert Mueller announced that former Trump campaign manager Paul Manafort and his longtime business associate, Richard Gates, have been indicted by a federal grand jury on 12 criminal counts that include conspiracy and money laundering.  Manafort and Gates surrendered themselves to FBI officials Monday. The indictment contends that Manafort earned more than $18 million dollars for consulting work for pro-Russian interests, that he hid his wealth in off-shore accounts, and that he spent it on a “lavish lifestyle.”  Manafort and Gates have pleaded not guilty to the charges, but it was also revealed Monday that former Trump campaign advisor George Papadopoulos, who was quietly arrested by the FBI last July, pleaded guilty October 5th to charges related to his efforts to arrange meetings between the Trump campaign and Russian government officials.  

Professor Byron Warnken, who teaches constitutional and criminal law at the University of Baltimore,  joins Tom on the line to examine what the indictments mean and what might follow, as Special Counsel Mueller continues his investigation into connections between Russia and the Trump campaign.

Photo courtesy wikimedia commons

And now a Monday edition of Midday at the Movies, our monthly look at what’s new and notable in Hollywood and throughout the film industry.  Tom's joined in Studio A by our movie maven regulars:  Ann Hornaday is the film critic for the Washington Post, and Jed Dietz is the founding director of the Maryland Film Festival

Today, they consider the sexual assault and rape allegations that have been leveled against legendary Hollywood producer Harvey Weinstein by dozens of women over the past several months:  Has public awareness of Mr. Weinstein's behavior altered the power dynamic for other major Hollywood producers and directors, and has it changed the work climate for the actors and other artists who depend on their favor?   

Then, Ann and Jed spotlight some of the interesting new films on the circuit this fall, including the recent collaboration by Selma director Bradford Young and Grammy Award-winning rap artist Common: two short films: Letter to the Free and Black America Again -- which have been finding audiences around the country and which showcased this past weekend at the Washington West Film Festival.

photo courtesy BCPS

Today, a Midday Newsmaker interview with Dr. Sonja Santelises, the president and CEO of the Baltimore City Public Schools.  School has been back in session for two months; for many more months than that, the Kirwan Commission has debated ways to re-vamp the funding formula for schools statewide.  Their findings were to have been released by the end of the year.  Now, it appears that we won’t hear their ideas until well into next year.  We’ll find out what that means for our city’s kids.  Dr. Santelises joins Tom for the hour in Studio A, and takes your questions and comments.

photo by Stephen Spartana

We're delighted to welcome to Midday's Studio A the internationally acclaimed classical musician,   Manuel Barrueco.  A few years ago, Fanfare Magazine called the Cuban-born artist the world’s greatest living classical guitarist, and it’s hard to dispute that encomium.  Three decades' worth of recordings and performances around the globe are the gold standard for legions of aspiring guitar players; for the past 25 years, he has shared his artistry and musical erudition with many of them at the Peabody Institute here in Baltimore.

This weekend, Manuel Barrueco comes to Towson University to open the Baltimore Classical Guitar Society's 30th anniversary season, with a program titled The Spanish Guitar.  The performance begins Saturday evening, October 28th at 8 p.m. in Towson’s Kaplan Hall.  Manuel will perform pieces by Fernando Sor, Granados, and Falla.  For directions and ticketing info, click here.

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