W. Brooks Paternotte | WYPR

W. Brooks Paternotte

Host, The Nature of Things

W. Brooks Paternotte took the helm of Irvine Nature Center as executive director in July 2013 and immediately began building on the strong 35-year foundation.  Brooks is a Baltimore native who was a teacher, coach, advisor, dean and Head of the Middle School during his 13 years at Boys’ Latin School in Baltimore.  He is also an instructor and ambassador of the National Outdoor Leadership School (NOLS) and is a Leave No Trace Master, as well as an avid outdoorsman and a features writer for FlyLife Magazine.

Ways to Connect

Bog Turtle

Jul 10, 2018

There are some species of animals that hold a special place in my heart. I know that as an environmentalist I’m not supposed to pick favorites, but some species just have that certain something that pulls on my heart strings. Enter the bog turtle, whose name is not especially fancy, but who could definitely use a little help from us humans.

JASON BOLONSKI/FLICKR CREATIVE COMMONS

Last June, my son Jack and I were wandering through the fields behind our home, when Jack came bolting toward me with his latest nature find.

Atop his finger was a tiny, green, kneeling insect peering at me through large eyes on its triangular head. Its miniscule, yet still prominent, front legs were held together at an angle that nearly looked like they were in reverence to some greater power. I knew immediately what it was: a juvenile praying mantis.

Meadow Voles

Jun 19, 2018
The New York Times

One of the most significant benefits to my position as Executive Director of Irvine Nature Center is access to the 210 acres of wild land we have here—and the incredible species that call it home. Our meadow, a wide open space filled with tall grasses and wildflowers, is a prime location to see large birds of prey on the hunt. Last week, I went out to the meadow for a walk after lunch. There were a number of hawks circling the space, waiting to swoop down and grab their prey. When one decided to strike, I saw it dive quickly and come back up from the grasses with something small, furry, and brown. I initially thought it was a mole, but moles spend so much of their time in their underground burrows, it would be surprising that one would be caught so easily above ground. Plus, this would have been a very small mole. It was then I remembered the meadow vole, a small rodent that is native to our area and quite prevalent. I’m sure that’s what this hawk grabbed for his late afternoon lunch.

BBC

I was having a conversation recently about these larger predators like coyotes, wolves, and mountain lions, whose territories are constantly changing in response to human decisions. With fewer and fewer wild, open spaces for these animals to hunt, it’s becoming increasingly common for us to see these species where we wouldn’t expect to – in our parks, our yards, and our highways. The plight of the mountain lion is especially interesting, as human interference has significantly impacted this species for centuries.

The Nature Conservancy

As the tender buds of spring flower and bloom to make way for summer’s lush greenery, an annual battle begins anew. This clash pits our big human brains and thumbs against one of our region’s most prolific species. It has seemingly few boundaries, except that of an unattractive, tall wire fence. As summer nears, gardeners and landscapers across our state suit up for combat against hungry deer, who see their carefully-laid beds of flowers as an all-you-can-eat buffet.

University of Maryland Extension Service

A few weeks ago, I visited a friend. We were sitting outside, enjoying the weather with a couple local brews while his daughter played nearby. Suddenly, his daughter yelled, “Dad! Come see this!” So we quickly got out of our chairs and hurried over. “Look at this bug,” his daughter demanded, “When I poke it, it curls up!” My friend smiled and said, “That’s a potato bug, sweetheart. You find them under rocks and in the dirt and, you’re right, they do curl up when you poke them.” Cue the sound of a record scratch on this idyllic scene. A potato bug? Surely my friend was confused. I didn’t want to contradict him in front of his child, so when we sat back down I said casually, “You called that a potato bug. I always called it a pill bug. I’ve heard it called a roly-poly…but not a potato bug.” “It’s a potato bug,” my friend retorted. I could see this wasn’t going anywhere, so I decided to drop it and read more about it later. As it turns out, we were both correct.

Dickcissel

May 22, 2018
All About Birds

I’m always on the lookout for our native plants and animals, and bright and early in the morning is a great time to see some of our most unusual species. Last week, I was up early and enjoying a cup of coffee before I started my day. I looked out my window at our birdfeeder, where a number of small songbirds had gathered for breakfast. One bird stood out from the rest with bright yellow markings. Initially, I thought this bird might be special – a rare find for our area. I looked for the rare bird’s markings – a back the same dusty brown as our common sparrows, with a bright yellow breast. It would also have a yellow “mask” around its eyes, making it look like a sparrow that was dressed up like a super hero. The bird I thought I saw was a dickcissel, a species that is now more commonly found in the Midwest than here on the East Coast. Alas, this time, my bleary morning eyes were just misidentifying a goldfinch.

Fungus Gnats

May 15, 2018
Planet Natural

Last week, I talked about one of our unsung insect heroes, the house centipede. This got me thinking about other small insects in our natural world that probably don’t get the attention or respect they deserve. Many of these creatures are very small and in many cases, are seen as a nuisance to us humans who just want to enjoy a nice day outside without insect interruption. Even though we view many insects as pests, their presence is an important link in the natural chain that ties all species together. So, I thought what better bug to feature than one who is instrumental in the reproduction of one of our native plant species, jack-in-the-pulpit? The insect I have in mind is the fungus gnat and, with a name like that, I think it could use some positive PR.

insectidentification.org

A few weeks ago, I was getting ready for bed after a long day; I was looking forward to tucking into the covers and the book I had been reading. I turned off the overhead light, turned on my reading light, and put my head back against my pillow. When I looked up at the ceiling, I saw the shadow of a massive bug. It had more legs than I wanted to take the time to count and must have been at least three inches long. This was not the relaxing evening picture I had imagined moments before, but I knew exactly what I was looking at—a house centipede.

Lockwood Gardens

A few nights ago, I was walking my dogs and enjoying a peaceful evening stroll. The breeze was light and the air was just starting to chill -- it was a perfect spring night. Suddenly without warning, I started to hear what sounded like small projectiles hitting the large boxwood next to me. I stopped and stood silently -- listening for the source of the sound. I continued to hear the repeated "tunk, tunk" of something hitting the tree. I thought for a moment that someone with very poor aim might be shooting at me with a sling shot or pellet gun. I decided to move along quickly and head home. When I got home, I immediately shared my experience with my wife. "It was probably just the wisteria seed pods popping," she said. Confused, I suggested that we sit down and research it together and sure enough, wisteria pods do that!

Ohio State University

Last summer, I was out for a walk to clear my head. The sun was shining and I was lost in thought, so I didn’t take notice when my hand casually brushed up against a plant. I immediately regretted my lack of attention because suddenly, my whole hand began to sting and burn. As the burning subsided, it was replaced by an intense itching as my skin turned red and produced small, raised welts. I had inadvertently run myself right into the leaves of a stinging nettle, a plant that packs a whole lot of histamines and toxins into its leaves and stem.

Minks

Apr 17, 2018
World Atlas

As the steward of the thirteen chickens that live in my family’s coop, I’m always on the lookout for would-be predators. Through fairytales and stories, we are often told to watch out for foxes in our hen houses, but there is a predator that can be wilier, slyer, and sneakier than a fox.  This animal is ruthless and demonstrates some downright vampiric tendencies. It has a thirst for blood…chicken blood…and can be found throughout Maryland.

The predator I’m speaking of is the American mink. For some of us, our only experience with a mink of any kind is a childhood memory of our grandmother’s fur coat. Minks aren’t an animal that we would often associate with our region, but they are very common.

I was out for a walk recently when I thought I saw a small bird flying in the distance. Its wings were a purple-ish brown color with buttery yellow edges that were bordered by bright blue spots. This bird seemed like it was in no particular rush to be anywhere—it was just flying around aimlessly. No native bird I could think of had coloring like this, and birds are unlikely to fly without direction. It was then that I realized I wasn’t looking at a small bird at all—I was instead watching the flight of a large mourning cloak butterfly. The arrival of mourning cloak butterflies in our region is one of the ways that our natural world tells us that spring time is here to stay.

One of the many perks of being the Executive Director of a nature center is my proximity to the front line of the battle against invasive species in our region. As our human world becomes ever-more connected, the creatures we share our planet with like sometimes like to join us for the ride. Unfortunately, when new species are introduced to our shores, they often have a devastating impact on our native flora and fauna. Such is the case with the Spotted Lanternfly, an invasive insect that arrived in Pennsylvania in 2014.

Visitors to Assateague Island have seen the beautiful ponies that roam free. Even those who have not had the benefit of visiting these creatures in person have likely read Margarite Henry’s book, "Misty of Chincoteague."

But the differently-named ponies--Assateague and Chincoteague--present some confusion.  Are they the same ponies? Different ponies? Do they even live on the same island?

Earthworms

Mar 22, 2018

A few weeks ago, I was out later than usual attending a dinner. The food was delicious, but I was eager to get home and rest for the evening. When I pulled into my driveway, it was clear that our outdoor flood light had burned out. I hopped out of my car and, not wanting to trip on the way to my front door, I turned on the flashlight function on my cell phone. I started to walk past my garden when I stopped abruptly.

I was about to step on something...and that something was moving. I focused my eyes on the ground beneath my feet and released that there was not just one moving something, but a whole yard full of somethings. I shined my flashlight around and I could see the alien-like movements of creatures writhing in the grass. As my feet and flashlight got closer, the wriggling figures quickly sucked back into the ground. What I’m describing sounds like something from a science fiction novel, but it’s an event that you can witness in the early spring after dark. It’s Earthworm mating season in Maryland!

Kevin Schofield/Flickr Creativ Commons

I’ve been to Gunpowder Falls State Park hundreds of times. I’ve gone canoeing through quiet streams, hiked miles upon miles, and fished throughout its narrow corridors. Each time I go, I hope to see an amazing, but elusive, animal that’s on most naturalists’ version of a bucket list. The remarkable ‘water acrobat:’ the river otter.

The Shrew

Mar 7, 2018

I was walking in the woods last week when I saw a small, furry flash race across the ground. It was too small to be a squirrel, and a little too big to be a mouse. I thought that I might have seen a mole, but this animal had small feet and lacked the flappy scuttling motion that a mole’s oversized feet would make. I stood there, puzzled by what I had seen. Was it a rat? What was it? Upon further reflection, I remembered the animal’s long snout and beady eyes. It was then that I realized I hadn’t seen a mouse or a rat or a mole…I had seen a shrew.

Rockfish

Feb 27, 2018

We’ve had some unseasonably warm weather recently, which teases so many possibilities for springtime and beyond. Of course, when we’re having such pleasant weather in February, it makes me think of one of my favorite outdoor activities—fishing.

Last year in May, I was out on the Bay for a Saturday fishing trip. The sun was shining, the breeze was blowing—it was a truly picture perfect day in Maryland. Suddenly, my line tightened—I had a bite! As I embarked on one of man’s most harrowing primeval adventures—the battle between a man and a fish on his line—I could feel the excitement build. The fish put up quite a fight, but in the end I had caught a 25 inch Rockfish, also known as a Striped Bass.

Tundra Swans

Feb 22, 2018

Last week while I was out for a hike, I happened across a pair of swans swimming serenely in a wetland pond. I stopped and watched the pair, marveling at their quiet grace. Later that afternoon, I considered exactly which species of swan I had seen...

Mushrooms

Feb 13, 2018
Andrejus Garkusa/flickr

Underneath the earth, spanning hundreds of miles below our feet, is a massive colony. Often referred to as the “internet of fungus”, this vast system of roots has the ability to connect with plants several miles away. Mycelium, the living body of a mushroom, is made up of a web of tiny filaments. It allows fungi, and other species, to communicate with each other. It helps plants receive water and nutrients and it can even help protect plants against certain infections. While all of this is happening below the ground, the mushroom we see above the earth is just as fascinating.

Pea Crabs

Feb 6, 2018
FWC Fish and Wildlife Research Institute/flickr

Excuse me waiter, there’s a pea crab in my oyster…If you’ve ever opened an oyster and found a little orange crab inside, consider yourself lucky! Many seafood lovers have called this tiny, spider-like crab a delicious surprise for many years. In fact, an article in The New York Times from 1913 recalls a story of a restaurant patron who sent his soup back with disgust upon finding a small orange “critter” in it. He was not aware that the tiny crab that had turned his stomach was a highly-prized delicacy - back in 1913, pea crabs sold for $2 a portion, which is roughly $50 today! Even George Washington was well documented as a fan of this fine food. So, what exactly is a pea crab?

Blue Crabs

Jan 30, 2018
AKZOphoto/flickr

As I sat in my car this morning, with the defroster on and the heat blasting, I thought about warmer weather. It seemed like just a few weeks ago I was sitting at the dinner table with friends and family enjoying one of my favorite Maryland treats – Blue Crabs. It will be awhile before I get to dig into this summer staple again and it seems like forever until I’ll need air conditioning in my car.

ALEXANDRA MACKENZIE/FLICKR

After brunch this Saturday, I was looking out the kitchen window while rinsing some dishes. Perching in a tree overlooking one of our bird feeders was a crow-sized hawk I hadn’t noticed before. From my vantage point, it appeared lightly colored in the front, with dark wings. I turned off the faucet to lean forward and get a closer look, when the hawk swooped into action. It flew toward the feeder, scattering visiting songbirds in all directions. A cardinal took off for the bushes and some house sparrows shot for the forest line.

Snowbirds

Jan 16, 2018
Irvine Nature Center/Facebook

One of my favorite parts of winter is the snowbirds. No, not the people who spend the cold months in Florida each year... I’m talking about the beautiful, artic birds like Tundra Swans, Snowy Owls, and Red Crossbills. Some of my most rewarding birdwatching has occurred in the winter months when bare trees and quiet parks create the perfect condition for seeing different species of birds.

Wood Frogs

Jan 9, 2018
Dave Huth/flickr

There’s a popular children’s movie, Frozen, that I have “watched” way too many times. It’s one of my children’s favorite movies and it is always on as soon as the first snow falls. In case you haven’t seen it, the main character has the ability to freeze people and objects with the wave of her hand. When we first watched it my son asked me “can people really be frozen?” I think he was disappointed to hear my answer, “no”. However, his curiosity did remind me of an animal who can freeze and thaw….a little brown frog who spends winter almost completely frozen, the Wood Frog.

leah/flickr

Brooks tells us about about our region's Southern flying squirrel!

Oysters

Dec 26, 2017
Paul Asman and Jill Lenoble Follow/flickr

Did you know there is a creature in the Chesapeake Bay that can filter up to 50 gallons of water in one day? Perhaps one of the most iconic species in the Chesapeake, the eastern oyster, is an essential part of the bay’s ecosystem. Their powerful vacuum-like ability to filter large amounts of water helps create a balanced ecosystem where many species can thrive.

@MrTrashWheel/Twitter

Think about the last time it rained. Maybe you were cozy at home reading a book, or you took your kids outside to jump in puddles. For me, rain reminds me of a harsh reality – trash pollution. When it rains, I imagine the piles of garbage sitting on the side of the street and think about where it goes, and then I think of Mr. Trash Wheel. Since May 2014, Mr. Trash Wheel has collected 1.4 million pounds of trash.

Wood Ducks

Dec 13, 2017
One Day Closer/flickr

Last week, while walking by the wetlands at Irvine, I saw a young male “dressed” elegantly and walking alongside the water. He wore chestnut on his body and iridescent green on top of his head.  A white collar extended along the side of his neck and a second one ran up each cheek. His bright red eyes glanced over at me as he descended into the water. Of course, this impressive attire wasn’t for my admiration. He was hoping to attract a female. This well-dressed creature is one of the most recognizable birds because of his decorative markings, and his scientific name, Aix Sponsa, echoes his beauty. The latin word “sponsa”, meaning betrothed, refers to this bird’s striking plumage as he appears to be dressed for a wedding. However, you probably know this dapper duck as a male wood duck.

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