W. Brooks Paternotte | WYPR

W. Brooks Paternotte

Host, The Nature of Things

W. Brooks Paternotte took the helm of Irvine Nature Center as executive director in July 2013 and immediately began building on the strong 35-year foundation.  Brooks is a Baltimore native who was a teacher, coach, advisor, dean and Head of the Middle School during his 13 years at Boys’ Latin School in Baltimore.  He is also an instructor and ambassador of the National Outdoor Leadership School (NOLS) and is a Leave No Trace Master, as well as an avid outdoorsman and a features writer for FlyLife Magazine.

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Sep 27, 2016
Bryn Davies/Flickr Creative Commons

Over the weekend, I was lucky to be hiking along a stream in Montgomery County. But the hastening sunset of early autumn took me by surprise and I found myself rushing down the trail toward the park exit. Just as dusk was reaching its end though, I saw something really incredible. 

A beaver about the size of a very overweight beagle waddled away from the trail and toward the stream. I heard the sharp, startling alarm smack of the large rodent’s wide, paddle-shaped tail hit the water. There was a pause as it looked at me, and then it gracefully escaped toward its lodge. I stood, silently watching the deep reddish-brown mammal’s comings and goings, until it was nearly too dark to see.

Canada Geese

Sep 20, 2016
SHAWN NYSTRAND/Flickr Creative Commons

You might be able to ignore the increasing amounts of leaves falling from trees, or the suddenly sinking nighttime temperatures. But when you hear the noisy, distinctive honking of a v-shaped flock of Canada geese as they migrate above you, there is no denying that autumn has arrived.    


Sep 13, 2016
James Jardine/Flickr Creative Commons

Over the weekend, my daughter Emma and I picked a posy of flowers for her mom. I was helping her tie a ribbon around the bunch when Emma stopped to pulled one green stalk out from the tiny bunch. She eyed the base of the stem curiously.

“This one’s square,” she told me, looking puzzled.

I took the greenery from her hands to confirm. She was right – though my expectation was for the stem to be round, this one was very clearly square. It had simple leaves that were opposite each other and smelled divine. We went straight to a plant book for some answers. In it, we learned quickly that if you pick a plant with a distinctly square stalk, then it is very likely a member of the mint family.

Andy Powell/Flickr Creative Commons

I always feel like I’m in a hurry. I hastily speed to work for a fast meeting. Then the kids need to get to soccer practice, stat. I fly home to let the dogs out—chop, chop, chop. I inhale a quick dinner while I’m on the run. And I hit ‘send’ on a rapid-fire text to a colleague about a task to bang out ASAP. Before I can blink, it seems, I’m racing to get back home for not-quite-enough shut-eye.

But a lot of animals live life in no hurry at all. Take slugs and snails, for example. They live luxuriously without a rush. For them, it’s a life in the slow lane. 

A snapping turtle's prehistoric appearance makes it an easy local species to identify.  It's an impressive reptile with a large head and a strong, hooked beak that makes it resemble a toothless yet ferocious old man.  


Aug 23, 2016
WAYNE THUME/Flickr Creative Commons

Sitting outside on my patio this weekend, my attempts at reading the Sunday paper were thwarted by an unmistakable, buzzsaw-like song.

I could hear, but not see, the culprit. With my kids at my heels, I ascended a nearby pine tree to pinpoint the noise and locate its source. Just a few limbs up, my son found a stout, one-inch long, black-and-green insect loudly calling out. My daughter knew it instantly. It was a cicada.

Pollination is something that’s happening in the natural world 24 hours a day. Its ordinariness might be why we forget how vital it is to our everyday lives.

The transfer of pollen from the male part to the female part of a flowering plant is essential to life on earth, for without pollination we would not have enough food. Over 90 percent of all known flowering plants, and almost all fruits, vegetables and grains, require pollination to produce crops. And since one out of every three bites of food we eat each day requires pollination to make it to our plate, we are indebted to the creatures that perform this critical service.


Aug 9, 2016

My family and I recently headed to Deep Creek Lake for some largemouth bass fishing. And although we caught and released some sizable fish, the highlight of our vacation was seeing a North American porcupine eating bark from a sugar maple along the side of Interstate 68.

The presence of porcupines in Maryland came as a surprise to me and my wife, but we have since learned that our state’s western counties have a regular population of these nocturnal rodents.  

Red Foxes

Aug 2, 2016
Anthony Adams/Flickr Creative Commons

There is a very clever animal that lives near my house. It’s so cunning, it knows to wait until my 3 Labradors are inside the house before coming onto my property. And it has a penchant for my chickens.

I could be quick to say that this fox has become my nemesis, with its maddening habit of sneaking in and stealing my egg layers. But the shrewdness with which this fox has outsmarted my chickens, my dogs and even me makes me hold his ingenuity and abilities in high regard.

Bird Boxes

Jul 26, 2016
Rick Leche/Flickr Creative Commons

Each day when I arrive at Irvine, birds busily flit between the many nest boxes that line the long driveway. These small wooden boxes provide essential nesting locations for many cavity-dwelling birds like eastern bluebirds and chickadees. And this year, Irvine inserted a camera into one of the boxes to get an up-close look at what’s going inside. I’m excited to have Irvine’s Director of Education, Robert Mardiney, with me in the studio today. Rob is a master naturalist and has monitored the box-visiting birds this season.