Charm City Blues, Pop-Up Korea Town, and Aging Gracefully | WYPR

Charm City Blues, Pop-Up Korea Town, and Aging Gracefully

Apr 1, 2015

Matt Stockwell shows off his original tabletop game, Charm City Blues; community artist Aletheia Shin discusses her work with Baltimore’s Korean immigrants; Marion Winik shares her essay, Miracles for Aging Hair and Skin; and Moira Egan reads from her poetry collection, Hot Flash Sonnets.

Game designer Matt Stockwell at the WYPR studios
What makes a good board game?  How tough should it be to win?  And what kind of story gets created along the way?  These are all questions that Matt Stockwell has thought about carefully for the past three years.  That’s how long he’s been developing his tabletop cooperative detective game, Charm City Blues.  Matt is in this studio this week with The Signal’s Aaron Henkin to show us how it works.
Korean seniors in Station North, participating in Aletheia Shin's Oongi Project (photo: Aletheia Shin)
Long before it inherited the name ‘Station North,’ the neighborhood around North Avenue and Charles Street was known as ‘Korea Town.’  Korean businesses have anchored the area for decades.  April 10th – 12th, that local community is being celebrated in an art exhibition called, Pop-Up Korea Town.  The Seoul Rice Cakes building at 2061 N. Charles is the site for the upcoming exhibition, which will feature traditional pottery made by local senior citizens.  The stories of these elder Korean residents will also be part of the exhibition.  Community artist Aletheia Shin is the mind behind the project, and she talks with Aaron Henkin.
Marion Winik
Aging gracefully…  It’s a nice expression, but let’s be honest.  We don’t live in a culture that honors the process of getting older, especially for women.  And so we turn things over to a woman with an eloquent perspective on the subject.  Marion Winik joins us with an essay she calls, Miracles for Aging Hair and Skin.
Moira Egan's poetry collection, "Hot Flash Sonnets," from Passager Books
Our meditation on ‘aging gracefully’ continues here with Moira Egan.  Egan is an award-winning poet, a longtime Signal contributor, and an accomplished literary translator.  She’s also in her fifties and is increasingly fussy about the thermostat.  Her poetry collection, Hot Flash Sonnets, gives a lyrical treatment to a subject that’s usually discussed in hushed tones and only among select company.  Egan visited with The Signal’s Aaron Henkin in 2013.