Come Together Under Trump? Or Remain In The Loyal Opposition? | WYPR

Come Together Under Trump? Or Remain In The Loyal Opposition?

Nov 14, 2016

Credit Ted Eytan

Six days ago, Americans elected Donald Trump to be the 45th president of the United States. Almost immediately after the election results were in, anti-Trump protests and rallies sprung up in cities across the country including here in Baltimore. People are taking to social media to express their dissent, using hashtags like #NotMyPresident. Despite calls for unity from President Obama, Sec. Hillary Clinton and the President-elect himself, it doesn’t seem likely that the anti-Trump sentiments will dissipate anytime soon.

So, how do the more than 64 million Americans who did NOT vote for Trump, come together, and reconcile their moral and ethical stances given Donald Trump’s consistently offensive rhetoric over the last 18 months? 

Do Americans who are vehemently offended by the President-elect’s comments about Mexican immigrants, Muslims, women,  African-Americans, prisoners of war and disabled people have a civic or ethical responsibility to set aside their differences and support the new president?  

How do minorities who felt targeted during the campaign cope with the fear of being retaliated against by Trump supporters or marginalized by Trump’s policies?

Hugh Taft-Morales is the leader of the Baltimore Ethical Society and the Philadelphia Ethical Society.  

Dr. LaKeita Carter is a licensed psychologist in private practice and owner of Institute for HEALing, LLC. Previously, she was the director of the Psychology Division for Loyola Clinical Centers in Baltimore. 

Jack Marshall is the president and founder of ProEthics, an ethical training and consulting firm.  

They join Tom to discuss the many questions that still remain about the ethics and moral implications of a Donald Trump presidency.