Poverty Capitalism: The Cost of Being Poor, Part II | WYPR

Poverty Capitalism: The Cost of Being Poor, Part II

Oct 31, 2014

We continue our discussion about poverty capitalism with a look at workers and consumers in Maryland. ​Susan Francis, deputy director of the Maryland Volunteer Lawyers Service, talks about the new Abell Report that explains Baltimore's tax sales policy, and how it adversely affects the city's poorest homeowners. Marceline White, executive director for the Maryland Consumer Rights Coalition, explains how rent-to-own stores and payday loans are risky bets for people who have difficulty getting credit. Plus, Kathleen Algire-Fedarcyk, policy analyst for the Maryland Center on Economic Policy, explains how tipped-wage workers have been left behind in the fight to increase the minimum wage. Also, Michael Reisch, professor of social justice at the University of Maryland School of Social Work, joins us to discuss the far-reaching consequences of poverty. 

Tipped-wage workers are being left behind in the fight to increase the minimum wage.