Unlocking a Musical Mind, That Should Be a Word, and Girl Problem Records | WYPR

Unlocking a Musical Mind, That Should Be a Word, and Girl Problem Records

Apr 16, 2015

James Burrows and Max Bent have created a catalogue of songs that offer insights into an autistic mind; Lizzie Skurnick previews her book, That Should Be a Word; and we talk Girl Problem Records founder Madi Shapiro and fellow musicians Jane Vincent and Sienna Cureton-Mahoney about carving out a space for female-powered punk rock.

James Burrows on the mic at Max Bent's home studio
  This is a story about what happens when an autistic boy crosses paths with an electronic music producer.  Two unlikely collaborators, James Burrows and Max Bent, have created something together that neither one of them could have achieved alone.  They’ve composed a library of songs that offer up a window into James’ mind.   Producer Aaron Henkin brings us the story.

  Fans of the New York Times Magazine may recall the popular That Should Be a Word column, penned by Lizzie Skurnick. Each week, Skurnick would coin a new word, like clipster or denigreet to describe a feeling, object, situation or event that defied description with common vocabulary. She’s collected the best of those words, along with some brand new expressions, in her book, That Should Be a Word.   Skurnick talks with producer Lisa Morgan. 
Madi Shapiro (foreground w/ guitar) fronts the band, Wet Brain, and is the founder of Girl Problem Records
  There’s a new record label in town, and it’s just released its first recording, a 7-inch vinyl compilation that features four DIY Baltimore punk bands.  These bands have a couple of things in common:  They’re all loud.  And they’re all fronted by women.  The label is aptly named, “Girl Problem Records,” and label founder Madi Shapiro drops in, along with fellow musicians Jane Vincent and Sienna Cureton-Mahoney, for a visit with Aaron Henkin.