A Blue View

Tuesdays 5:45 pm

A Blue View is a weekly perspective on the life aquatic, hosted by National Aquarium CEO John Racanelli.  From the smallest plants and animals invisible to the human eye to entire ecosystems, every living thing depends on and is intricately linked by water.

Tune in to 88.1 WYPR every Tuesday at 5:45 p.m. as John brings to the surface important issues and fascinating discoveries making waves in the world today.


Its eye is the size of your head. It lives more than 3,000 feet deep in oceans around the world and is 30 feet long, yet it lacks a backbone. With eight arms and two tentacles, it is the origin of the myth of the Kraken.


We talk a lot about being “sustainable,” but what does it really mean? Tj Tate, director of sustainable seafood at the National Aquarium, is here today to talk about this sometimes misunderstood term, and what it means in the seafood industry.


When it comes to biodiversity of plants and animals, the number of species typically increases as you move from the colder temperate zone to the warm tropics. The epicenter of salamander diversity, however, exists much further from the Equator—in fact, it’s here.


You may not be able to dance, but you do have rhythm. All humans have rhythm. It is the circadian clock, a 24-hour cycle that regulates our sleep-wake timing and other physiological processes.


Perhaps you are familiar with the saying “an albatross around your neck.” This phrase, coined by the poet Samuel Taylor Coleridge, in his 1798 poem, The Rime of the Ancient Mariner, refers to the association of the albatross with bad luck, mishap, struggle and worry.