Elections

Local election coverage from WYPR programs and newsroom.

Information on registering to vote.  Find your polling place here.

sarbanes.house.gov

    

Wednesday means politics on Maryland Morning, and we begin today with Rep. John Sarbanes, live in Studio A.  Congressman Sarbanes, who lives with his family in Towson, is a Democrat who has represented Maryland’s 3rd Congressional District in the U.S. House of Representatives since 2007. He sailed through last month’s primary election, winning 87% of the Democratic vote. His far-flung district includes parts of Baltimore County and Baltimore City but also narrow slices of Howard, Montgomery and Anne Arundel counties, including Annapolis. It’s been called one of the most gerrymandered congressional districts in the country, and it heavily favors Democrats.

The 53-year-old incumbent will face businessman, lawyer and physician Mark Plaster, who won the Republican primary last week. The 3rd District includes a very diverse set of constituents within its serpentine boundaries. Congressman Sarbanes has a wide pallet of policy interests. He is a national voice on campaign finance reform. His recent initiatives have addressed everything from the opioid abuse crisis to climate change, solar energy, and environmental education.

Dixon’s comeback try falls short

Apr 27, 2016

Despite her loss, former Mayor Sheila Dixon was feeling the love at her election night party. Her concession speech was interrupted several times by supporters shouting that they love her, and Dixon sent that message right back to them. 

Chris Van Hollen’s victory party last night took on a festive glow long before positive results were more than just exit polls and wishful thinking. It might well be called a moment of affirmation after a bruising campaign. 

Pugh secures Democratic nod for mayor

Apr 27, 2016

State Senator Catherine Pugh claimed victory last night in a tightly contested Democratic mayoral primary that became tighter as the evening went on, then focused on unity and moving forward in her victory speech. 

Edwards goes down swinging

Apr 27, 2016

Congresswoman Donna Edwards fell short yesterday in her quest to become only the second black woman ever elected to the U.S. Senate. But she didn’t bow out of the race for the Democratic nomination before delivering a fiery speech that pointed out some uncomfortable truths to her fellow Maryland Democrats. 

donkeyhotey.com

Maryland's 2016 primary election is now history.  State Senator Catherine Pugh is a big step closer to her dream of becoming Charm City’s next Mayor, and Chris Van Hollen and Kathy Szeliga will go head-to-head to replace Barbara Mikulski in the U.S. Senate. Results are also in for a host of other city and state-wide races that were decided yesterday.  

What would a talk show be without a little post-primary prognostication?  We welcome back to the broadcast Jayne Miller, an award-winning investigative reporter for WBAL television, who has covered Charm City politics and a whole lot more for many years.

Complete coverage of yesterday’s primary continues today on WYPR on Midday with Sheilah Kast, and with reports from the WYPR news team this afternoon during All Things Considered   

Primary choices

Apr 26, 2016

Primary day in Maryland started with some fireworks when nearly fifteen hundred people showed up at Sandi’s Learning Center on Ellamont Avenue to work for mayoral candidate Catherine Pugh. They said they were promised paying jobs, but it all went south when campaign staffers said they didn’t need anyone else. 

Five delegate-rich states on the East Coast will vote Tuesday: Maryland, Pennsylvania, Delaware, Rhode Island and Connecticut. Call it the "Acela Primary" for the train that runs through those states.

There's a lot at stake. Here are four things we're watching:

For Pugh, it's a race to primary day

Apr 25, 2016

With the primary election looming on Tuesday, this weekend was the start of a sprint to the finish line for state Senator Catherine Pugh in her bid to be the Democratic nominee for mayor.

“Welcome back.”

That’s what Theresa Jones said to Sheila Dixon, when she came across the former Mayor at the Unity Rally and March at Penn and North Sunday.

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