The First Five Years | WYPR

The First Five Years

Wednesdays at 4:32 pm
  • Hosted by Hosted by: Linnea Anderson

"The First Five Years" is a weekly program presented by Maryland Family Network.  The series is focused on the extraordinary developmental period from birth to age five. "The First Five Years" highlights the challenges and opportunities related to nurturing young children and helping them build a solid foundation for success in school and in life.

“The First Five Years” is made possible with major support from the M&T Charitable Foundation. 

You can listen to an archive of past episodes of "The First Five Years" here.

To Santa or not to Santa?  Some parents struggle with whether to make Santa Claus a part of their holiday tradition.  Is it lying to the child?


When you’re a toddler the world revolves around you. The arrival of a new little brother or sister is exciting for grown-ups.  But for the first born it can be stressful and scary.


Learning the value of money and how to make it last should start young. In fact, financial literacy can be begin with babies.

  The holidays can be full of stress. But with a little planning and teamwork, Thanksgiving can be a wonderful time for all ages to reflect on all that is good in our lives.

Will your little one grow up to be the next Joan Rivers or Steve Martin?  Maybe not.  But even so, the ability to chuckle, giggle, and laugh helps to reduce stress, build connections and encourage creative thinking.


Maryland Family Network

Bullying can start in the early years—even before school. Young children might call names, act out physically, or intimate others. Listen to learn tips aimed at helping parents and caregivers prevent bullying early and to keep it from escalating. 

Maryland Family Network

For more than two decades, experts have recognized the importance of early exposure to a language-rich environment.  By age three, children from low-income families hear far fewer words than their more affluent peers-- nearly 30 million fewer words. This disparity puts poorer children at a huge disadvantage when starting school. But a Temple University study suggests that exposing low- income children to more language isn’t enough to overcome this difference.

Maryland Family Network

What does it take for parents to build a secure attachment with their child? Find out this week as we welcome Dr. Marti Erickson as guest host of The First Five Years. 

Maryland Family Network

If you could change the lives of millions of children and families for the better, in a matter of just minutes, would you do it? Listen to find out what it takes.

Maryland Family Network

New research about from Northwestern University will be music to your ears. They found that after two years of musical training, the brain function of at-risk children improved significantly. What’s more, this research could hold the key to reducing the achievement gap. Listen now to learn more.

Maryland Family Network

Just under half of the children in the United States have lived through at least one traumatic experience. These experiences have lasting effects on health, social, and economic outcomes in adulthood. But there is hope. Listen to find out how you can help.

Maryland Family Network

Nightmares can be triggered by a number of things. It’s important to take the time to listen and comfort your child as she experiences this important but sometimes scary milestone.     

Maryland Family Network

  

Anxiety is a normal part of life, even for young children. It’s especially common when children are separated from parents for the first time. But for some children the symptoms continue and may get worse. Find out what you need to know to make sure your child’s anxiety isn’t interfering with her development and happiness. 

Maryland Family Network

Are you ready for kindergarten? It won’t be long until your preschooler is ready to start kindergarten. This can be challenging for both children and parents. Start planning now to help make the transition a smooth one.

Maryland Family Network

Are you raising a social child? Parents want to help children grow up to feel confident and secure. But the markers of social competency in young children can be hard to spot. But there are signs to look for. Listen now to find out more.

Maryland Family Network

Ever wish you could take a break from the routine? Well, for very young children routines build a sense of security and self-confidence. They may also help children do better in school and be more successful adults.

Maryland Family Network

Maryland Family Network

Reliable child care is just a phone call away. Take the time to make the right choice—the first five years last forever. 

Early childhood development occurs rapidly, so choosing a reliable care provider is critically important. LOCATE: Child Care, a FREE phone referral service of Maryland Family Network, can help you make the right choice.

Maryland Family Network

Got a picky eater at home? Relax. It's not uncommon for young children to turn down a new food up to 15 times before they even try it. Zero to Three has some ideas that may help around your dinner table.

Maryland Family Network

Young children are naturally active. So if we give them plenty of room and opportunity to move, they’ll literally jump at the chance. Children who exercise are healthier physically and emotionally. Listen for some ways to get the kids in your life moving towards a lifetime of fitness.   

Maryland Family Network

Between thunderstorms and threats of tornadoes, this has been a summer full of turbulent weather. Take the time when the sky is clear to make sure your family is ready for whatever Mother Nature sends our way. A little planning now can save lives when disaster strikes.

Maryland Family Network

Communicate early and often. The future depends on it.  When you find a child care provider who is just right, you know your little one is in a safe nurturing environment. But there is more to it than dropping off in the morning and picking up after work. For the wellbeing of the child, both parents and caregivers owe it to each other to communicate.

Maryland Family Network

Math helps children develop critical thinking and problem-solving skills. The developing brain is not only ready to learn and use language, it is also capable of learning and using math and scientific thinking. It is important to practice and develop these skills early.

Maryland Family Network

From the day they're born, children communicate in many ways. For example, crying can mean  boredom, hunger or pain depending on the pitch and volume. The national nonprofit Zero to Three has some tips to help parents encourage language development in babies.

Maryland Family Network

Need a cure for the summertime blues? Try learning something new! Whether you go down to the ocean or stay at home this summer, chances to learn are everywhere. For more on this topic visit www.marylandfamilynetwork.org

Maryland Family Network

Let’s change the way we talk about fatherhood. 

Maryland Family Network

When a loved one dies, parents may wonder how or even if to talk about this with children.

When parents talk honestly and in age-appropriate ways, children can make sense of the experience.

Maryland Family Network

We each have a story to tell. It’s your turn. 

Since the dawn of time, there have been storytellers. But we are just starting to understand how important this tradition is. New research published in The Atlantic suggests that young children who hear lots of detailed family stories grow into well-adjusted adolescents.

For more on this topic visit marylandfamilynetwork.org

Maryland Family Network

Children and Pets

There’s nothing cuter than young children and animals together. When children help care for a pet it teaches responsibility and boosts self-esteem. But if you’re thinking about adopting a cuddly companion, listen to this first. 

Maryland Family Network

 

 

 

Finding child care is often difficult. With frequent relocations, deployments, and distance from extended family, it can be especially hard for military families. That’s where Maryland Family Network comes in. LOCATE: Child Care has helped many military personnel find options that are right for them. A LOCATE Referral Specialist works directly with families to help identify quality care and find openings. This lets service members focus on jobs and their families. 

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