Humanities Connection | WYPR

Humanities Connection

Thursday at 4:44 pm
  • Hosted by Hosted by: Maryland Humanities Executive Director Dr. Phoebe Stein

Humanities Connection explores the role of the humanities in our daily lives, and features lively reflections around topics like education, literature, health care, race, politics, religion, history, and more.

Joining Phoebe for each segment is a series of special guests, including Maryland Humanities partners, board members, and local humanists. The result is a mix of stories and conversation designed to shed light on the human experience and stimulate the intellectual curiosity of our listeners.

Archive Prior to 11/5/13

Theme music created by Brian Whaley at www.brianwhaleymusic.com

Visit Maryland Humanities to access additional resources, videos, and other dynamic content related to each segment.

Maryland Humanities is a statewide, educational nonprofit that creates and supports educational experiences in the humanities that inspire all Marylanders to embrace lifelong learning, exchange ideas openly, and enrich their communities.

What are the humanities? The humanities explore the human experience. Through the humanities, we think about who we are – our ideas, our histories, our literature, our values – and how we relate to one another. The humanities include literature, history, philosophy, archaeology, languages, theology, jurisprudence, ethics, art history, architecture, and some disciplines of the social sciences.

Small Museums in Maryland

Jan 19, 2017
Lindsey Baker

This episode originally aired on June 25, 2015

From local history to living history, the arts to architecture, Maryland is host to hundreds of Museums statewide, many of which are small and led by teams of dedicated volunteers. Every Maryland County has a historical society, complimented by dozens of local historical groups.

The Work of William Christenberry

Jan 12, 2017

On today's Humanities Connection, Kimberly Gladfelter Graham, curator of the exhibit "Laying-by Time: Revisiting the Works of William Christenberry" at the Maryland Institute College of Art, tells us about Christenberry's artistry and vision.  

The B&O and the Track to Smalltimore

Jan 5, 2017
Johns Hopkins University

Dr. Matt Crenson, Professor Emeritus in Johns Hopkins University's Department of Political Science, tells us how the B&O Railroad impacted the entire course of Baltimore's economic growth.

On Forgiveness

Dec 29, 2016
icjs.org

In Pt. 2 of our series with the Institute for Islamic, Christian and Jewish Studies, Dr. Benjamin Sax tells us about the Jewish theologian Abraham Joshua Heschel and his philosophy on forgiveness.

Following the Example of Dorothy Day

Dec 22, 2016
catholicworker.org

Dr. Heather Miller Rubens, Executive Director at the Institute for Islamic, Christian, and Jewish Studies tells us how social activist Dorothy Day's life and legacy of generosity can  be an example to all of us.

Networked Anthropology

Dec 16, 2016

How have smartphones and our constant connectivity changed the way we travel- and the way we relate to one another through the places we visit? Towson University anthropology professors Samuel Collins and Matthew Durington tell us how their research led them to the new idea of “networked anthropology.” You can read more about this idea on their Tumblr. 

A Feast for the Senses

Nov 17, 2016

What was life like in the Middle Ages in Europe? A Feast for the Senses: Art and Experience in Medieval Europe, a new exhibition from the Walters Art Museum sponsored in part by the National Endowment for the Humanities, depicts the human experience of that time through hundreds of life-inspired works of art. Joaneath Spicer, acting curator of the exhibition, tells us more.

Public Libraries as the New Commons

Nov 10, 2016

Placemaking is the idea of utilizing a community’s local assets in order to create quality public spaces that contribute to the well-being of the community and create a sense of belonging through place. Silvia Blitzer Golombek, a nonprofit consultant and secretary of the Board of Maryland Humanities, shares how public libraries serve as such spaces for local communities.

Classics in the Modern Age

Nov 3, 2016

The enduring value of classic literature lies in its exploration of the human condition and also its ability for modern interpretation. Can today’s students in our modern world relate to classics that were written centuries before their time? Towson University Professor John McLucas provides this reflection on a recent class on Ariosto’s epic 16th century Italian poem, Orlando furioso.

The First Folio of Shakespeare

Oct 27, 2016

To mark the 400th anniversary of Shakespeare’s death in 1616, the Folger Library and the National Endowment for the Humanities are bringing the First Folio of Shakespeare to one site in every state. With support from Maryland Humanities, St. John’s College is hosting the Folio in Maryland from November 1–December 4. Christopher Nelson, President of St. John’s College, tells us why the First Folio is so important.

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