Humanities Connection

Thursday at 4:44 pm
  • Hosted by Hosted by: Maryland Humanities Executive Director Dr. Phoebe Stein

Humanities Connection explores the role of the humanities in our daily lives, and features lively reflections around topics like education, literature, health care, race, politics, religion, history, and more.

Joining Phoebe for each segment is a series of special guests, including Maryland Humanities partners, board members, and local humanists. The result is a mix of stories and conversation designed to shed light on the human experience and stimulate the intellectual curiosity of our listeners.

Archive Prior to 11/5/13

Theme music created by Brian Whaley at www.brianwhaleymusic.com

Visit Maryland Humanities to access additional resources, videos, and other dynamic content related to each segment.

Maryland Humanities is a statewide, educational nonprofit that creates and supports educational experiences in the humanities that inspire all Marylanders to embrace lifelong learning, exchange ideas openly, and enrich their communities.

What are the humanities? The humanities explore the human experience. Through the humanities, we think about who we are – our ideas, our histories, our literature, our values – and how we relate to one another. The humanities include literature, history, philosophy, archaeology, languages, theology, jurisprudence, ethics, art history, architecture, and some disciplines of the social sciences.

Impact of Maryland History Day

Apr 7, 2016

Did you know that each year the Maryland Humanities Council coordinates the National History Day competition in Maryland? Last year nearly 24,000 Maryland students engaged in this year-long historical research experience. Dylan Rogers Elliott, a former Maryland History Day participant and current student at University of Maryland, Baltimore County, tells us about how this program has made a lasting impact on his life.

Literary Walking Tour of Mount Vernon

Mar 31, 2016

Ever wanted to follow in the footsteps of the famous authors, poets, and editors who lived in Baltimore? Every third Saturday in April through October, the Maryland Humanities Council offers a Literary Walking Tour of Mount Vernon, taking you through majestic cultural institutions, past elegant mansions, and into the minds of Baltimore’s literary luminaries, artists, and journalists. On April 2, we’re kicking off the season with a special tour coinciding with Light City Baltimore. Jessica Baldwin, Program Assistant for Maryland Center for the Book, tells us more about the tour.

Diversity in Theater

Mar 24, 2016

On April 2, the University of Maryland’s School of Theatre, Dance and Performance Studies will hold its third annual Black Theatre Symposium, supported in part through a grant from the Maryland Humanities Council. Scot Reese, artist and professor at UMD’s School of Theatre, Dance, and Performance Studies and one of the co-organizers of the symposium, tells us how this event aims to build diversity and community in theater.

 

Baltimore Stories

Mar 17, 2016

On March 23, the University of Maryland Arts and Humanities Center for Synergy, the Maryland Humanities Council, and other partners will kick off “Baltimore Stories,” a program designed to examine the roles of narrative in the life and identity of Baltimore, with a day-long public forum featuring David Simon and Dr. Khalil Gibran Muhammad. Sheri Parks, co-program director and associate dean at the College for Arts and Humanities at UMD, tells us more about Baltimore Stories.

The Impact of Pulitzer-Winning Journalism

Mar 10, 2016

Did you know that this year marks the centennial of the Pulitzer Prizes? In celebration of that milestone, the Maryland Humanities Council is offering a year-long series of events to highlight the impact this award-winning work has had on our lives. Made possible through a grant from the Federation of State Humanities Councils, the programming kicks off on March 8 with journalist panels at the Baltimore Sun. Diana Sugg, Pulitzer-Prize winning Sun journalist, shares the powerful impact that investigative journalism and the Pulitzer Prizes have on our world. 

All Baltimore Voices

Mar 3, 2016

After the death of Freddie Gray in police custody last April and the unrest that followed, the Maryland Humanities Council reflected on how the humanities could help. From this discussion came our Humanities Fund for Baltimore, a special grant program for local nonprofits. One of the program’s first round grantees, the Reginald F. Lewis Museum, tells us about its funded project: “All Baltimore Voices: Stories About & Beyond the Unrest.”

 

Changing Baltimore

Feb 25, 2016

Through its Changing Baltimore series, sponsored in part by a grant from the Maryland Humanities Council, the Baltimore Museum of Industry is unearthing and sharing the history behind Baltimore’s ever-changing neighborhoods. The series uses lectures, films, and discussions in order to discover the past and present industrial landscape of our city. Anita Kassoff, executive director at the Baltimore Museum of Industry, tells us more.

Our Baltimore

Feb 18, 2016
Courtesy of Eubie Blake Cultural Center

On February 11, the Eubie Blake Cultural Center opens its “Our Baltimore” exhibit, which tells the stories of African Americans in Baltimore through the civil rights era to present day. The exhibit, supported in part by the Maryland Humanities Council, tells these stories by highlighting the work of the Phillips family, Baltimore-based photojournalists. Cheryl Goodman, program associate at Eubie Blake, tells us more. 

Sounding Botany Bay

Feb 11, 2016
Courtesy of UMBC

On February 16, the Dresher Center for the Humanities at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County will host a humanities forum discussing how humans have changed a unique Australian environment. Tim Nohe, Professor of Visual Arts and Director of the Center for Innovation, Research and Creativity in the Arts at UMBC, spent nine years researching Australia’s Botany Bay. He tells us more about this experience and what he learned.

A Walk Through Shakespeare

Feb 4, 2016

Did you know that this year marks 400 years since William Shakespeare’s death? With support from the Maryland Humanities Council, local nonprofit Arts Every Day is commemorating this historic anniversary by partnering with Baltimore City Public School communities to engage students with Shakespeare, to understand the historical context through artifacts, and to engage in performing and visual art-making. Julia Di Bussolo, executive director of Arts Every Day, tells us more.

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