Humanities Connection | WYPR

Humanities Connection

Thursday at 4:44 pm
  • Hosted by Hosted by: Maryland Humanities Executive Director Dr. Phoebe Stein

Humanities Connection explores the role of the humanities in our daily lives, and features lively reflections around topics like education, literature, health care, race, politics, religion, history, and more.

Joining Phoebe for each segment is a series of special guests, including Maryland Humanities partners, board members, and local humanists. The result is a mix of stories and conversation designed to shed light on the human experience and stimulate the intellectual curiosity of our listeners.

Archive Prior to 11/5/13

Theme music created by Brian Whaley at www.brianwhaleymusic.com

Visit Maryland Humanities to access additional resources, videos, and other dynamic content related to each segment.

Maryland Humanities is a statewide, educational nonprofit that creates and supports educational experiences in the humanities that inspire all Marylanders to embrace lifelong learning, exchange ideas openly, and enrich their communities.

What are the humanities? The humanities explore the human experience. Through the humanities, we think about who we are – our ideas, our histories, our literature, our values – and how we relate to one another. The humanities include literature, history, philosophy, archaeology, languages, theology, jurisprudence, ethics, art history, architecture, and some disciplines of the social sciences.

Do you know what a skipjack is? Or what a wooden eel pot is used for? These are just some of the traditions of Maryland’s Eastern Shore, which will be brought to life for locals and visitors alike in the Maryland Humanities-supported Delmarvalous Festival on May 20. Lora Bottinelli, executive director of the Ward Museum of Wildfowl Art, Salisbury University, tells us more.

The Ties that Thrive: Humanities in Communities

May 4, 2017

As the continuation of  federal funding for the National Endowments for the Arts and Humanities remains uncertain, we reflect upon the impact of the humanities and arts in communities both large and small throughout the country. Anne Wise, director of the Phi Beta Kappa Society’s National Arts and Sciences Initiative, shares her perspective.

Judgement Day for Maryland History Contest

Apr 28, 2017
www.mdhumanities.org

Each year, more than 27,000 middle and high school students, throughout the state, compete in the historical research contest known as Maryland History Day. On April 29, more than 600 of those students will move on to the state contest at University of Maryland Baltimore County (UMBC).

The Revelatory Power of Language

Apr 13, 2017

How does the language we use reflect who we are? Christine Mallinson, sociolinguist and associate professor of Language, Linguistics, and Culture at UMBC, shares what our word patterns can reveal.

Literary Mount Vernon

Apr 6, 2017
Maryland Humanities

 

Want to get some fresh air and learn about some of Baltimore’s literary greats? Spring marks the return of Maryland Humanities’ Literary Mount Vernon Walking Tour, with tours beginning on April 15. Here to tell us more about the charms of Historic Mount Vernon is one of the tour’s docents, Anne Cantler Fulwiler.

The History of Work in Kent County

Mar 30, 2017

Nina Johnson, executive director of Sumner Hall in Chestertown tells us about the history of work in Kent County.

Sumner Hall is one of five sites in Maryland that will host The Way We Worked, a Smithsonian Institution Museum on Main Street traveling exhibition. The exhibit will be at Sumner Hall through May 19, 2017.

The Humanities Explore Fundamental Questions

Mar 22, 2017

Students who study the humanities as part of a well-rounded liberal arts education explore questions fundamental to the human existence. Who are we? Where have we been?

Bridging the Divide

Mar 16, 2017

 

On March 29, following a four-part series from the Baltimore Sun, Maryland Humanities, Loyola University Maryland, and the Sun are hosting a community conversation on school segregation in Maryland. Sun Enterprise Editor Diana Sugg tells us about the recent history of segregation in our schools.

Preserving the Past

Mar 9, 2017
MARMIA

Siobhan Hagan, president and CEO of the Mid-Atlantic Regional Moving Image Archive tells us about the value of audio-visual preservation.

The Signifance of Auschwitz

Mar 6, 2017
Jewish Museum of Maryland

Deborah Cardin, deputy director of programs and development at the Jewish Museum of Maryland tells us about "Remembering Auschwitz: History, Holocaust, Humanity" and the significance of Auschwitz today. This exhibition is supported by Maryland Humanities.

Ian Belknap

Feb 23, 2017
Ian Belknap Twitter

What do Malcom X and Julius Caesar have in common? Ian Belknap, Artistic Director for The Acting Company explains. 

Uncovering History in St. Mary’s County

Feb 16, 2017
smcm.edu

What can found oyster shells tell us about an area’s past inhabitants? Dr. Julia King, professor of anthropology at St. Mary’s College of Maryland, shares how she and her students are delving into the history of Secowocomoco, a farmland in St. Mary’s County in Southern Maryland.

Preserving History Through Memorabilia

Feb 9, 2017
lewismuseum.org

On February 11, in commemoration of Black History Month, the Reginald F. Lewis Museum will host the Black Memorabilia Fine Art and Craft Show. Lindsey Johnson, producer of this annual event, tells us about the importance of sharing and preserving black memorabilia.

"The Way We Worked," the Allegany County Shift

Feb 2, 2017
Alan Mays

How has the labor force changed in Maryland throughout the years? We’re bringing a new Smithsonian traveling exhibition, The Way We Worked, to five communities in Maryland this year and companion exhibitions will uncover the unique history of work in our state. Allegany Museum Board member Dr. Nayano Taylor-Neumann tells us about the history of work in Allegany County, the first stop on the tour.

The Way We Worked

Jan 26, 2017
museumonmainstreet.org

Museum on Main Street, a collaboration between the Smithsonian Institution and State Humanities Councils nationwide, brings high-quality traveling exhibits to small communities across the country. Over the next year, the Maryland Humanities will bring the labor-focused Smithsonian traveling exhibit The Way We Worked to five small communities across Maryland, beginning February 4 in Allegany County. Carol Harsh, Director of Museum on Main Street, tells us more about how this program impacts the small communities it serves.

Small Museums in Maryland

Jan 19, 2017
Lindsey Baker

This episode originally aired on June 25, 2015

From local history to living history, the arts to architecture, Maryland is host to hundreds of Museums statewide, many of which are small and led by teams of dedicated volunteers. Every Maryland County has a historical society, complimented by dozens of local historical groups.

The Work of William Christenberry

Jan 12, 2017

On today's Humanities Connection, Kimberly Gladfelter Graham, curator of the exhibit "Laying-by Time: Revisiting the Works of William Christenberry" at the Maryland Institute College of Art, tells us about Christenberry's artistry and vision.  

The B&O and the Track to Smalltimore

Jan 5, 2017
Johns Hopkins University

Dr. Matt Crenson, Professor Emeritus in Johns Hopkins University's Department of Political Science, tells us how the B&O Railroad impacted the entire course of Baltimore's economic growth.

On Forgiveness

Dec 29, 2016
icjs.org

In Pt. 2 of our series with the Institute for Islamic, Christian and Jewish Studies, Dr. Benjamin Sax tells us about the Jewish theologian Abraham Joshua Heschel and his philosophy on forgiveness.

Following the Example of Dorothy Day

Dec 22, 2016
catholicworker.org

Dr. Heather Miller Rubens, Executive Director at the Institute for Islamic, Christian, and Jewish Studies tells us how social activist Dorothy Day's life and legacy of generosity can  be an example to all of us.

Networked Anthropology

Dec 16, 2016

How have smartphones and our constant connectivity changed the way we travel- and the way we relate to one another through the places we visit? Towson University anthropology professors Samuel Collins and Matthew Durington tell us how their research led them to the new idea of “networked anthropology.” You can read more about this idea on their Tumblr. 

A Feast for the Senses

Nov 17, 2016

What was life like in the Middle Ages in Europe? A Feast for the Senses: Art and Experience in Medieval Europe, a new exhibition from the Walters Art Museum sponsored in part by the National Endowment for the Humanities, depicts the human experience of that time through hundreds of life-inspired works of art. Joaneath Spicer, acting curator of the exhibition, tells us more.

Public Libraries as the New Commons

Nov 10, 2016

Placemaking is the idea of utilizing a community’s local assets in order to create quality public spaces that contribute to the well-being of the community and create a sense of belonging through place. Silvia Blitzer Golombek, a nonprofit consultant and secretary of the Board of Maryland Humanities, shares how public libraries serve as such spaces for local communities.

Classics in the Modern Age

Nov 3, 2016

The enduring value of classic literature lies in its exploration of the human condition and also its ability for modern interpretation. Can today’s students in our modern world relate to classics that were written centuries before their time? Towson University Professor John McLucas provides this reflection on a recent class on Ariosto’s epic 16th century Italian poem, Orlando furioso.

The First Folio of Shakespeare

Oct 27, 2016

To mark the 400th anniversary of Shakespeare’s death in 1616, the Folger Library and the National Endowment for the Humanities are bringing the First Folio of Shakespeare to one site in every state. With support from Maryland Humanities, St. John’s College is hosting the Folio in Maryland from November 1–December 4. Christopher Nelson, President of St. John’s College, tells us why the First Folio is so important.

Public Philosophy in Today’s World

Oct 20, 2016

The study philosophy explores the human condition and searching for meaning in the world around us. Today, public philosophy brings the practices of philosophy to public forums to address social, ethical, and other contemporary issues. Aaron Rodriguez, an Assistant Professor in the Department of Philosophy and Religious Studies at Morgan State University, provides a reflection on the growing field of public philosophy and how his students are putting philosophy to action. 

Then & Now: Baltimore in the Public Eye

Oct 13, 2016

Ever wondered how Baltimore looked a hundred years ago, compared to today? In a new temporary exhibition at the Baltimore Museum of Industry, supported by Maryland Humanities, you can glimpse side-by-side comparisons of historic Baltimore landmarks, then and now. Anita Kassoff, executive director of the Baltimore Museum Industry, tells us more.

Aaron Douglas and All American Boys

Oct 6, 2016

This year’s One Maryland One Book, All American Boys, tells the powerful story of two high school boys, one white and one black, brought together by injustice. One of the protagonists, Rashad, is a budding artist whose work is influenced by renowned painter Aaron Douglas. Rena M. Hoisington, Curator of Prints, Drawings & Photographs at The Baltimore Museum of Art, tells us more about Douglas’s life and work.

Pulitzer-Prize Winning Drama

Sep 29, 2016

This year Maryland Humanities is celebrating the centennial of the Pulitzer Prizes with a yearlong series of events highlighting the impact these award-winning works have on our lives. As part of this celebration, Olney Theatre Center will present a three-day festival of readings and discussions from September 30 to October 2 examining Pulitzer Prize-winning plays. Staff members from Olney Theatre Center tell us how these works changed their lives.

One Maryland One Book, Through the Eyes of the Library

Sep 23, 2016

Each fall Maryland Humanities’ One Maryland One Book program brings together diverse people in communities across Maryland through the shared reading and discussion of one book. Discussions occur at public libraries, high schools, colleges, museums, bookstores, correctional facilities, and other locales around the state. Lynn Wheeler, Executive Director of the Carroll County Public Library, shares why One Maryland One Book is a vitally important program for libraries throughout Maryland.

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