The Morning Economic Report | WYPR

The Morning Economic Report

Monday-Friday at 7:33 am

Anirban Basu, Chairman Chief Executive Officer of Sage Policy Group (SPG), is one of the Mid-Atlantic region's leading economic consultants.  Prior to founding SPG he was Chairman and CEO of Optimal Solutions Group, a company he co-founded and which continues to operate. Anirban has also served as Director of Applied Economics and Senior Economist for RESI, where he used his extensive knowledge of the Mid-Atlantic region to support numerous clients in their strategic decision-making processes.  Clients have included the Maryland Department of Transportation, St. Paul Companies, Baltimore Symphony Orchestra Players Committee and the Martin O'Malley mayoral campaign.

He is the author of numerous regional publications including the Mid-Atlantic Economic Quarterly and Outlook Maryland. Anirban completed his graduate work in mathematical economics at the University of Maryland.  He earned a Masters in Public Policy from Harvard University in 1992.  His Bachelors in Foreign Service is from Georgetown University and was earned in 1990.

Richard Elzey/flickr

If you are driving right now, you might be able to spot a Ford F-150 pickup truck. In fact, you may be driving one. Since 1977, Ford has sold enough F-series trucks to circle the earth more than three times. As reported by CNN Money, the F-series has been America’s best-selling truck 40 consecutive years. Ford recently announced that it has sold more than 26 million units since the model line’s introduction. Analysts say that the F-series has become more popular due to cultural factors.

Miranda Granche/flickr

Economists have suffered enormous difficulty trying to explain why productivity has failed to expand as rapidly as it has in the past. A recent report supplied by the polling company Gallup singles out anti-competitive and wasteful practices by teachers unions, associations of physicians, universities and local governments. Researchers tracked health, education and housing costs from 1980 to 2014. They find that the combined spending in these three areas rose from 25 percent to 40 percent of GDP since 1980 without commensurate improvements in quality.

Education Deserts

Jan 11, 2017
anah1ta/flickr

In Baltimore and in many other communities, it is common for people to identify and speak of food deserts – places where it is challenging for residents to purchase nutritious food. According to the Urban Institute, there are also education deserts – places that are many miles away from a community college or other places where one can obtain needed skills training.

Children and Income

Jan 10, 2017
Jon Grainger/flickr

A recent study by the public policy organization, Demos, indicates that the financial burden of having young children can substantially reduce a family’s income and increase its chances of falling into poverty.

Oscar Ucho/flickr

Maybe you had a terrific 2016 or maybe you didn’t. Companies can also have good or bad years. According to CNN Money, here are some of the companies that had a terrible year and hope to bounce-back in 2017.

Auckland Photo News/flickr

You may have heard the song “The Twelve Days of Christmas” a lot over the past few weeks. While it’s unlikely that you would actually purchase a Partridge in a Pear Tree or Two Turtle Doves or Six Geese a-Laying, etc., you could conceivably. Each year, the PNC Index calculates the cost of purchasing the 12 sets of items listed in that song, including those 11 pipers piping and 12 drummers drumming.

The Price of a Penny

Jan 5, 2017
Alejandro Mallea/flickr

When you find all those pennies in your pockets or in the crevices of your couch, your probably feel pretty annoyed. Pennies are not very valuable and in sufficient numbers are heavy and bulky. But the next time you find a penny, you might want to consider how expensive it was to manufacture.

Kathryn Decker/flickr

Eduardo Porter recently authored a fascinating article regarding rates of economic recovery by race and ethnicity. He points out that while Hispanics, African Americans and Asian Americans have millions more jobs now than they did in November 2007, the last month before the recession, Caucasians have actually lost 700,000 more jobs than they gained.

Jeremy Sternberg/flickr

Many people focus upon the fact that the official U.S. unemployment rate is below five percent. But that number can be misleading since it doesn’t include discouraged workers – people who would like to be working but gave up looking for a job.

Oscar Ucho/flickr

A new administration is coming to Washington, D.C., but the current one is not quite done. Recently, the White House released its annual Economic Report of the President. This will of course be the last such volume produced by the Obama administration.

Pages