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The Morning Economic Report

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Anirban Basu, Chairman Chief Executive Officer of Sage Policy Group (SPG), is one of the Mid-Atlantic region's leading economic consultants.  Prior to founding SPG he was Chairman and CEO of Optimal Solutions Group, a company he co-founded and which continues to operate. Anirban has also served as Director of Applied Economics and Senior Economist for RESI, where he used his extensive knowledge of the Mid-Atlantic region to support numerous clients in their strategic decision-making processes.  Clients have included the Maryland Department of Transportation, St. Paul Companies, Baltimore Symphony Orchestra Players Committee and the Martin O'Malley mayoral campaign.

He is the author of numerous regional publications including the Mid-Atlantic Economic Quarterly and Outlook Maryland. Anirban completed his graduate work in mathematical economics at the University of Maryland.  He earned a Masters in Public Policy from Harvard University in 1992.  His Bachelors in Foreign Service is from Georgetown University and was earned in 1990.

Mark Goebel/flickr

You may have heard of the so-called North Carolina Bathroom Bill. Many people didn’t like the policy and responded by withdrawing economic activity from that state. The Associated Press estimates that North Carolina’s bathroom bill will cost the state nearly $4 billion in lost business over a dozen years.

Listen for more on this story.

Matt Acevedo/flickr

Perhaps you’ve lived through the following situation – an acquaintance tells you that a common friend, perhaps someone you went to school with or once worked alongside, is now making a lot of money. You ask, well where do they live? They say New York, and you say, well then they’re really not making that much are they?  

Anirban has more. 

Erich Ferdinand/flickr

Men are in decline. That seems like a strange thing to say when one considers that last year, nearly 96 percent of all Fortune 500 CEOs were male. But on the other end of the spectrum, men are dropping out of the labor force in large numbers and falling behind women in terms of both college attendance and graduation rates.

Anirban has more on this story.


Katherine Seery/flickr

A new working paper published by The National Bureau of Economic Research indicates that there are double standards in the nation’s financial advisory industry when it comes to disciplining men versus women. The paper is entitled “When Harry Fired Sally: The Double Standard in Punishing Misconduct."

Anirban has more on this story. 


Kathryn Decker/flickr

There was a time several years ago when the job market was flooded with eager applicants. Many people had lost their jobs, unemployment was elevated, and large numbers of college graduates added to the volume of job seekers. As indicated by Bloomberg, during and after the recession, many employers began requiring college degrees for entry level jobs. That was then, this is now.

Anirban has more.


James Tipton/flickr

Recent data from the Job Opportunities and Labor Turnover Survey or JOLTS indicate that the U.S. labor market continues to strengthen. Though the JOLTS report is a month behind the highly publicized monthly employment report supplied by the Labor Department, it is still followed by economists because of the additional insights it provides. The most recent report indicates that both the rate of hiring and quitting jobs rose in early 2017.  

Anirban has more. 


WalrusWaltz/flickr

There has been considerable discussion in recent months about the role of immigrants in American society.  Some of this discussion may have made people wonder if the U.S. is as open to people from other parts of the world as it once was. Apparently, many people, including students, have come to the conclusion that America has, at least for now, become a less desirable destination.

Anirban has more. 


Tax Incentives

Mar 28, 2017
Jonas Bengtsson/flickr

With so much emphasis being placed on the need to accelerate job creation and economic growth, communities across the country are offering companies rich incentives to expand operations or to relocate.  As reported by The Wall Street Journal, economic development tax incentives have more than tripled over the past twenty-five years, offsetting about thirty percent of the taxes the companies receiving incentives would otherwise be paying.

Anirban has more. 


futureatlas/flickr

There was a time when the housing market could be characterized as a buyer’s market.  Several years ago, the inventory of unsold homes was elevated.  Many families found that they could no longer qualify for a mortgage.  The result was that buyers in the market had plenty of choice and negotiating power vis-à-vis sellers.  That is no longer the case.  

Anirban has more. 


charlie holzhausen

There are a lot of Baby Boomers and members of Generation X who like to complain about Millennials – who represent the youngest members of the U.S. workforce. Those of us from older generations complain about their seemingly insatiable appetite for flex time and for positive feedback regardless of the quality of their work. They also don’t seem to cherish the things that we cherished, like television. 

Anirban has more on this story.


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