On The Record | WYPR

On The Record

Weekdays, 9:30 to 10:00 am

Catch On the Record, hosted by Sheilah Kast, weekdays from 9:30 to 10:00 am, following NPR’s Morning Edition. We’ll discuss the issues that affect your life and bring you thoughtful and lively conversations with the people who shape those issues -- business people, public officials, scholars, artists, authors, and journalists who can take us inside the story. If you want to share a comment, question, or an idea for an interview you’d like to hear, email us at ontherecord@wypr.org.

Theme music created by Jon Ehrens.  Logo designed by Louis Umerlik.

Ways to Connect

Iraqi Jewish Archives

During a search for weapons of mass destruction in 2003, it was discovered that Saddam Hussein’s intelligence headquarters held priceless artifacts ... then the building was bombed and burst water pipes and flooded the basement nearly destroying the contents. Marvin Pinkert, the director The Jewish Museum of Maryland, tells the story behind the dramatic rescue of these artifacts, several of which are featured in the museum's latest exhibit, “Discovery and Recovery: Preserving Iraqi Jewish Heritage.” The centuries-old records detail communal life, religious practices and eventual persecution of Jews in Iraq.

Louis Blank tells the story about how even the uninvited guests to his wedding felt special. Don't miss the Stoop’s season kickoff, The Stoop in The Dark: Stories about the Unseen, Unknown, and Untold, Thursday, October 26, 7:00 pm at the The Senator Theatre. You can find information and more stories at stoopstorytelling dot com.

The Sixth Branch

Few neighborhood rebuilding groups can claim they’re driven by a military sense of purpose. Today we hear from Rich Moore, founder of The Sixth Branch in Baltimore. He and Scott Goldman, the nonprofit's executive director talk about how the group channels the leadership skills and commitment of military veterans to serve local communities through organizing, building and maintaining projects. Regina Hammond, joins us too, to talk about the lasting impact The Sixth Branch has had on the Johnson Square neighborhood. Find out how you can get involved here.

Dean Shareski / Flickr via Creative Commons

One of the most common learning disabilities - dyslexia - complicates how a child learns to read and write. Because their brains are wired differently, students with dyslexia are at risk of falling behind their peers.

A radio documentary by APM Reports - Hard to Read: How American Schools Fail Kids with Dyslexia -  highlights the challenges dyslexic students in Baltimore County face in getting the services they need. Producer Emily Hanford tells us how the great debate over how to teach reading is leaving kids behind.

And Pamela Guest, an advocate with Decoding Dyslexia - Marylanddescribes the frustration of watching her son struggle to read. Guest is also the editor of IEP Magazine.

After a devastating fire in March 2016, The Book Thing--a free book depot--is back! Founder Russell Wattenberg tells us about the path to rebuilding and how the community stepped up.

The Station North Tool Library Facebook page

Not-so handy around tools? No worries: the Station North Tool Library has tools and classes for every level of workshop experience. Co-founder Piper Watson tells about the 3,000 tools the library has on offer and the wide variety of its members. The first-ever Fix It Fair is October 21st from 11 am - 3 pm at 417 E Oliver St.

Wikimedia Commons

Five hundred years ago this month, the German monk Martin Luther challenged the practices of the Roman Catholic church, sparking the Protestant Reformation and shaping how Christians think and worship.

Bishop Denis Madden, of the Catholic Archdiocese of Baltimore, and Rev. Mark Hanson, of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America, describe the dialogue aimed at reuniting their denominations.

And we speak to Yu Na Han, who curated an exhibit at the Walters Art Museum about Luther’s life as father, friend, and husband.

That was neurosurgeon Dr. Alfredo Quiñones-Hinojosa telling his stoop story about a special patient who, facing his fight against brain cancer, taught the doctor a important lesson about life. The story was part of a special stoop event: “Hopkins Medicine, A World Inside a City,” in May 2012. More stories at stoopstorytelling.com.

Project Bridge

YouTube

More than 300 million people across the globe don’t see the world with what is considered normal color vision. Today we meet glass scientist Dr. Donald McPherson, who accidentally discovered he could help those people. He’s the mind behind Enchroma glasses, designed to unlock color vision for those with color-deficient sight. We also capture the moment when local illustrator and art educator Jonathon Scott Fuqua tries the glasses for the first time. It changed the way he was used to seeing the world.

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