On The Record | WYPR

On The Record

Weekdays, 9:30 to 10:00 am

Catch On the Record, hosted by Sheilah Kast, weekdays from 9:30 to 10:00 am, following NPR’s Morning Edition. We’ll discuss the issues that affect your life and bring you thoughtful and lively conversations with the people who shape those issues -- business people, public officials, scholars, artists, authors, and journalists who can take us inside the story. If you want to share a comment, question, or an idea for an interview you’d like to hear, email us at ontherecord@wypr.org.

Theme music created by Jon Ehrens.  Logo designed by Louis Umerlik.

Ways to Connect

Maryland’s highest court told judges to minimize use of money bail, and the Legislative Black Caucus backs that approach. But the Senate passed and sent to the House a bill saying judges MUST look at money bail, along with other options. All this after the bail-bond industry made big campaign donations to key legislators. We speak to Jennifer Bevan-Dangel, executive director of Common Cause Maryland, which tracked those campaign contributions, and Democratic Senator Anthony Muse, who sponsored the bill.

This week we hear a story from Hope Marshall, about her struggle with depression and the stigma surrounding mental illness. You can listen to more stories, and learn about Stoop shows and The Stoop podcast, all at stoopstorytelling.com.

Writer and journalist Alex Kotlowitz has written books, articles, radio shows and a TV documentary about various ways urban violence affects young people and shapes their lives. On Monday he’ll be in Baltimore for the Johns Hopkins “Social Determinants of Health Symposium.”

LAWRENCE OP / FLICKR VIA CREATIVE COMMONS

Small-muscle athletes. In the medical field, that’s the term for musicians. Musicians are prone to a range of injuries. It’s a pitfall of the profession. But unlike their large-muscle counterparts, musicians don’t get much pro-active attention when it comes to pain. As Dr. Raymond Wittstadt, attending hand surgeon at the Curtis National Hand Center at MedStar Union Memorial Hospital puts it, “I mean even at the high school level, most sports teams will have a trainer on the sidelines. There’s nobody in the wings of the BSO saying we practiced too long today, or we repeated that passage too many times.” Wittstadt has held a monthly musicians’ clinic at the center for more than 15 years.

via The Emporiyum

A free, public conference this weekend at the American Visionary Arts Museum builds upon its current exhibit about the future of food. We hear from presenter Deborah Mizeur, the co-owner of Apotheosis Herb Farm on Maryland's Eastern Shore. Conference details available here

Roaches, rats, bed-bugs, and other people-loving pests have been with us for centuries. And despite our best efforts, they persist. That’s particularly true in cities, especially in neighborhoods with a history of disinvestment. Pests are living symbols of our long battle with inequality. We hear from UMBC professor Dawn Biehler, author of "Pests in the City: Flies, Bedbugs, Cockroaches, and Rats".

via Wikimedia Commons

President Trump’s goals for reshaping the U.S. are starting to come into focus. His plans may be altered by the Republican Congress. But it’s not too soon to start assessing what the Trump economic agenda might mean for Maryland. We hear from Darius Irani, vice president of Innovation and Applied Research at Towson University and chief economist for the Regional Economic Studies Institute (RESI), and Anirban Basu, president and CEO of The Sage Policy group.

Dorian Gray shares his true tale of a nerd’s revenge. You can listen to more stories, and learn about Stoop shows and The Stoop podcast, all at stoopstorytelling.com.

Most mental-health care in the U.S. is delivered by social workers, more than psychiatrists and psychologists. As the American Association for Psychoanalysis in Clinical Social Work gathers here this weekend, we talk to two therapists about Baltimore’s special spot in the development of psychoanalysis, the challenges for therapists and residents in a city suffused with trauma, and how that influences the approach social workers take in therapy.

Credit Courtesy of the Jewish Museum of Maryland

Six million Jewish lives were lost during World War II and the Holocaust. A new exhibit at the Jewish Museum of Maryland explores the history of the Holocaust through the lens of the town of Auschwitz in Poland. Deborah Cardin, the museum’s deputy director, explains that today the town is known as the location of a massive complex of Nazi concentration camps. But before that, she says, "The town was a place where for hundreds of years, Jewish residents and non-Jewish residents lived side by side beginning in the 16th century." We also hear from Edie Creeger, whose mother survived the Holocaust in Hungary. Together, they, alongside other local survivors, created collages to tell their stories and honor their loved ones.

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