On The Record | WYPR

On The Record

Weekdays, 9:30 to 10:00 am

Catch On the Record, hosted by Sheilah Kast, weekdays from 9:30 to 10:00 am, following NPR’s Morning Edition. We’ll discuss the issues that affect your life and bring you thoughtful and lively conversations with the people who shape those issues -- business people, public officials, scholars, artists, authors, and journalists who can take us inside the story. If you want to share a comment, question, or an idea for an interview you’d like to hear, email us at ontherecord@wypr.org.

Theme music created by Jon Ehrens.  Logo designed by Louis Umerlik.

Ways to Connect

Here’s a Stoop story from the indie-mom of comedy, MEshelle, about her childhood move to a Jewish neighborhood and the cultural exchanges that ensued. You can hear her story and others at stoopstorytelling.com.

pixcooler.com

Caring for patients with memory loss or dementia can be challenging for even the most attentive, well-meaning caregiver. We meet Jay Newton-Small, a journalist whose new business aims to improve the lives of seniors with a new online resource called MemoryWell; in it, writers tell the stories of those who can’t tell their own. We also hear from Bertina Hanna, head of a caregiving team that uses MemoryWell, about the impact it can have on working with patients.

Howard County Public School System

In January, Howard County unveiled a building unlike any other in the state. The brand new Wilde Lake Middle School is Maryland’s first net-zero energy school: over the course of a year, it produces as much energy as it uses. The Director of School Construction for Howard County Public School System, Scott Washington, tells us about the school’s solar and geothermal systems and how its design anticipates energy usage.

Check out these videos of the school's construction.

baltimorecraftbeerfestival.com

In most states you can add beer or wine to your grocery list, and buy it when you pick up milk, bread and eggs. In Maryland, for the most part, you can’t--for decades only liquor stores can sell beer and wine. Some people argue that changing that would save customers money; others contend it would hurt small businesses. We talk with Adam Borden, president of “Marylanders for Better Beer and Wine Laws,” about the roots of the law -- dating back to prohibition -- and how the laws might change.

Reading Partners Baltimore Facebook page

For five years the nonprofit ‘Reading Partners’ has collaborated with low-income schools in Baltimore, pairing students who struggle to read with a community volunteer. This week those Reading Partners are back in schools, aiming to serve 900 students with the aid of 1100 tutors.

Today we’ll hear from executive director Jeffrey Zwillenberg about the project’s curriculum, and from returning volunteer Robin Kessler. Plus, Principal Najib Jammal of Lakeland Elementary Middle School describes how the benefits of one-on-one coaching extend beyond literacy.

Here’s a Stoop Story from Jeremy Stern, about love, comic books, and the adventures of “Adequate Man.” You can hear his story and many others at stoopstorytelling.com.

The Women's Center at UMBC

The world of comic books is filled with feats of bravery and alien invaders. The most visible superheroes in pop culture--Superman, Spiderman, Batman--are all white men. But these days readers want heroes and villains who resemble themselves, so writers feature a more diverse set of characters. Comic-book enthusiast Prachi Kochar tells us about the stories that make her feel included--such as comics about the character Hawkeye, who like Prachi, is deaf. Read Prachi's blog post about comic books here.

For more comic book fun, check out Baltimore ComicCon, this weekend at the convention center. Click here for more information.

Oh, Rats!

Sep 21, 2017
Theo Anthony

Where there are people, there is debris, and where there is debris, there are rats … We meet Theo Anthony, the creator of “Rat Film,” a documentary that investigates Baltimore’s rat infestation, juxtaposed with its history of racist urban planning. And we talk with Karen Houppert, a journalist who documents the abundant rat carcasses she encounters in her Charles Village neighborhood. You can see "Rat Film" and attend a public health discussion afterwards on Sept. 21 at the Parkway Theater.

The Declaration of Independence lists the pursuit of happiness as one of our inalienable rights. But is happiness equally available to everyone in America? Our public debate about economic policy seldom looks at that.

We speak with Carol Graham, of the Brookings Institution and the University of Maryland School of Public Policy. Professor Graham has looked at research linking income inequality with well-being to show that the widening gap in prosperity is creating a parallel gap in people’s hopes and aspirations. Her new book’s title is a question: “Happiness for All?”

Carol Graham will be speaking tonight at the JHU Barnes and Noble at St. Paul and 33rd Streets at 7 pm. The event is free and open to the public. You can RSVP here.

Baltimore Office of Promotion and the Arts

At the 22nd Baltimore Book Festival this coming weekend at the Inner Harbor writers will have a chance to get a professional critique of their work, readers a chance to meet and interact with hundreds of published authors and everyone a chance to enjoy some live music. We speak with Kathy Hornig, festivals directors for the Baltimore Office of Promotion and the Arts, novelist Jen Michalski of the “Starts Here” writers’ readings and Carla Du Pree, executive director of City Lit Project, to hear about festival history and highlights.

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