On The Record | WYPR

On The Record

Weekdays, 9:30 to 10:00 am

Catch On the Record, hosted by Sheilah Kast, weekdays from 9:30 to 10:00 am, following NPR’s Morning Edition. We’ll discuss the issues that affect your life and bring you thoughtful and lively conversations with the people who shape those issues -- business people, public officials, scholars, artists, authors, and journalists who can take us inside the story. If you want to share a comment, question, or an idea for an interview you’d like to hear, email us at ontherecord@wypr.org.

Theme music created by Jon Ehrens.  Logo designed by Louis Umerlik.

Ways to Connect

Stories from The Stoop: Michael Singleton

Apr 28, 2017

Michael Singleton tells a tale about how his relationship with cooking defined his relationship to what he can call home. It was at a special Baltimore Museum of Art Stoop Storytelling in November 2015. 

Farmers Markets Celebrate Summer

Apr 28, 2017

There’s something that just shouts summer when the smells and colors of a farmer’s market envelope your senses on an early Saturday or Sunday morning as you wander through the just picked vegetables, fragrant flowers and fresh baked goods that fill the aisles. We look at two markets in Baltimore that have truly stood the test of time.

Lawyers in the Library

Apr 27, 2017
Maryland Legal Aid

Lawyers in the Library, a partnership between Maryland Legal Aid and the Enoch Pratt Free Library, grew out of the unrest in Baltimore City after Freddie Gray died from injuries received in police custody. ‘Lawyers in the Library’ gives convenient access to free legal advice right in the neighborhood.  Amy Petkovsek directs the Community Lawyering Initiative at Maryland Legal Aid and her client Shannon Powell, along with Melanie Townsend Diggs, manager of the Pennsylvania Avenue Branch of the Enoch Pratt Free Library, talk about the genesis of the free legal assistance program and the difference its made it more than one thousand people's lives. To volunteer or find more information about Lawyers in the Library, visit Maryland Legal Aid or visit Enoch Pratt Free Library calendar.

Benjamin A. Skolnik and Elizabeth Pruitt / University of Maryland Hornbake Library

It was at the Wye Plantation near Easton that the boy Frederick Douglass first realized he was not free. University of Maryland archaeologists have meticulously pieced together clues about the daily lives of the African Americans owned by the Lloyd family -- the garden they designed, the kitchen crops they grew, the foods they cooked and their religious symbols reflecting African spirituality as well as Christianity. Professor Mark Leone gives us a tour of the exhibit “Frederick Douglass & Wye House: Archaeology and African-American Culture in Maryland.”

WYPR

The recent General Assembly session made significant changes in state law about sexual assault, and held back from some other changes. Lawmakers said the state no longer has to prove force in order to prosecute a rape charge; the legislature also gave survivors of child sex abuse more time to sue in court. They did not approve a measure that would have allowed courts, when a child is conceived through rape, to terminate the parental rights of rapists.

Baltimore Speakers Series website

The Baltimore Speakers Series presented by Stevenson University wraps up its current season with an evening that delves into where America stands today on issues of race and reconciliation. Speaker Michele Norris, former host of NPR's All Things Considered and founder of The Race Card Project, offers a preview of Tuesday's discussion that she'll have with fellow speakers Jason Riley, a senior fellow at the Manhattan Institute and a columnist for the Wall Street Journal and Morris Dees, founder the Southern Poverty Law Center. You learn more about Michele Norris’s Race Card Project here and find information about the last evening of the 2016-2017 Baltimore Speakers Series presented by Stevenson University here

How does the Baltimore Improv Group, starting with the barest suggestions from the audience about characters and emotions, create a full-length improvised play? Dave LaSalle, one of the directors, and Tim German, one of the improvisers, take us inside the theatrical magic that ends up as Unscripted. Lights! Action? Cue -- who??

Stories from the Stoop: Fabiola Ramirez

Apr 21, 2017

Time now for a Stoop story. This week we hear an immigrant family’s tale of courage, strength and perseverance. Here’s Fabiola Ramirez, sharing her family’s story of coming to the US and thriving against all odds.

Reporting Child Abuse

Apr 21, 2017
Baltimore Child Abuse Facebook page

When kids are the victims of child abuse, they often don’t realize it--they need adults to speak for them. We ask the head of the Baltimore Child Abuse Center, Adam Rosenberg, about who has a responsibility to report child abuse, how to do it, and what resources are available for victims.

Science Not Silence

Apr 20, 2017
March for Science Facebook page

Thousands of scientists and supporters of science are painting protest signs, filling their water bottles and laying out their walking shoes for the first-ever March for Science in Washington on April 22, 2017. Scores of events are planned in other cities too. Some scientists are boycotting, fearful the march will tarnish the credibility of science. But Marnie Halpern, on the faculty of the Carnegie Institution for Science, plans to take part with a busload of colleagues. She says it's less about protesting policies of the Trump administration than about normally reticent scientists shining a light on their research.

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