On The Record | WYPR

On The Record

Weekdays, 9:30 to 10:00 am

Catch On the Record, hosted by Sheilah Kast, weekdays from 9:30 to 10:00 am, following NPR’s Morning Edition. We’ll discuss the issues that affect your life and bring you thoughtful and lively conversations with the people who shape those issues -- business people, public officials, scholars, artists, authors, and journalists who can take us inside the story. If you want to share a comment, question, or an idea for an interview you’d like to hear, email us at ontherecord@wypr.org.

Theme music created by Jon Ehrens.  Logo designed by Louis Umerlik.

Ways to Connect

“A photograph is a secret about a secret. The more it tells you the less you know.” That’s a quotation from the famous photographer Diane Arbus, who died in 1971. Does the sentiment hold true in the age of the Internet? Do photographs still have the power to captivate? Today we talk to Baltimore artist and writer Mark Alice Durant, who has just published “27 Contexts: An Anecdotal History in Photography.” The book is part memoir and part meditation on the role of photography in our lives.

Although fears of terror attacks run high, how common are these events and who are the perpetrators? Why is it so difficult for policymakers to craft effective counterterrorism measures? We speak to Gary LaFree, professor of criminology and criminal justice at the University of Maryland College Park, and director of the ‘National Consortium for the Study of Terrorism and Responses to Terrorism’ there. He is co-author of the new book “Countering Terrorism: No Simple Solutions.”

Adam Croot / Flickr via Creative Commons

After rejecting the measure last year, the Baltimore City Council is expected to vote tonight on whether to adopt a $15 dollar minimum wage. The city currently follows the Maryland minimum wage and is on track to reach $10.10 per hour by 2020. David Cooper of the Economic Policy Institute tells us why he thinks a $15 minimum is necessary; Henry Holzer of the Brookings Institution tells us why he thinks it’s risky.

Janet Stephens is obsessed with the hairstyles of ancient Rome. Here's her story about how that happened. You can listen to more stories, and learn about Stoop shows and The Stoop podcast, all at stoopstorytelling.com

RX: Laughter

Mar 17, 2017
Poi Photography/Flickr via Creative Commons

Laughter is the best medicine. It turns out there’s science to back up that old adage. Research has shown that a good belly laugh on a regular basis is as effective at lowering blood pressure as medication. Dr. Michael Miller directs the Center for Preventive Cardiology at the University of Maryland School of Medicine. He’s also the author of “Heal Your Heart: The Positive Emotions Prescription to Prevent and Reverse Heart Disease.” And his prescription doesn’t require a trip to the pharmacy. “We’re looking at about 5 to 15 minutes of laughter that either brings tears to your eyes or after the laughter episode is finished, you feel relaxed,” he says.

Larry C. Price/Undark Magazine

For a long time we’ve heard about the problems our love of cheap clothing causes around the world: problems like lax environmental and safety regulations, and child labor. Today we’re going to zero in on an industry you may not have heard as much about: leather. A riveting four-part visual tour of textile and tannery industries around the globe recently appeared in the online magazine Undark. We plan to focus on the tannery portion. Freelance journalists Debbie and Larry Price produced the series, with the support of the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting. Both are former Baltimore Sun staffers and both join us from a studio near their home in Dayton, Ohio.

The older you are, the more likely you take multiple prescription drugs. More medications mean more risks - potential drug interactions and a greater chance of making a mistake. Dr. Nicole Brandt, executive director of the University of Maryland School of Pharmacy’s ‘Peter Lamy Center on Drug Therapy and Aging’, discusses how patients can talk to their doctors about paring down the number of med they’re taking.

Then, millions of seniors live with chronic pain. Dr. Beth Hogans, head of the National Institutes of Health ‘Center of Excellence for Pain Education’ at Johns Hopkins and medical director of the ‘Chronic Pain Program’ at Medstar Good Samaritan Hospital, offers strategies to reduce pain and increase quality of life.

Baltimore City is home to more than 30,000 veterans. It is also home to the Veterans Treatment Court - a special docket of Maryland’s District Court - which aims to rehabilitate, rather than incarcerate, former military members. We speak to two social workers from the VA-Maryland Health Care System, who work with veterans facing criminal charges, as well as with a Vietnam vet who graduated in January from the docket.

Cancer treatments like surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation can be harrowing, and the cancer often returns. But a new treatment has come into use: it harnesses the body’s own immune system to destroy cancer. So far, immunotherapy doesn’t work in most patients. But when it does, the results can seem miraculous. Cancer survivor Stephanie Joho had run out of treatment options when she discovered immunotherapy. She recalls a moment soon after she started treatment: “I sat at the dinner table and I remember crying. Because I looked at my parents and I said, ‘I’m hungry.’ I didn’t remember what that felt like. I hadn’t felt hunger in probably over a year.” She and Dr. Drew Pardoll, director of the Bloomberg-Kimmel Institute for Cancer Immunotherapy at Johns Hopkins, join us.

How many people can call Antarctica home? Here's Meg Adams speaking in 2011 about her time living at the South Pole research station in Antarctica. You can listen to more stories, and learn about Stoop shows and The Stoop podcast, all at stoopstorytelling.com.

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