Your Maryland | WYPR

Your Maryland

Thursdays 5:44 pm

Since 2002, "Your Maryland" hosted by Ric Cottom, has presented little-known human interest stories from Maryland's past.  Beginning with accused witches and the murderous career of John Dandy in the earliest days of the colony, through Morgan State's fabled "Ten Bears" in the 1970s, the show covers nearly four centuries of heroes, scoundrels, floods, fires, riots, plots, athletes (two-and four-legged), beautiful spies, brilliant writers, misunderstood pirates, and ghosts. All of that color, suspense, and humor is part of your Maryland.

Rockets Red Glare Stories

"Despot's Heel"

Aug 17, 2017

The look at the daily lives of the young Union soldiers who occupied various forts around Baltimore during the Civil War. 

"Halsted"

Aug 9, 2017

Between the 1880s and the 1920s, Dr. William S. Halsted and his students revolutionized the practice of medicine at Johns Hopkins hospital. 

"Good Deeds"

Aug 3, 2017

On July 3, 1863, Confederate officer Henry Kyd Douglas was wounded just south of Gettysburg and becomes first a patient and then a prisoner of Union troops and their allies. 

On July 24, 1868, a massive storm caused terrible flooding along the Patapsco River Valley, including the mill town of Ellicott City. 

Bonus March

Jul 20, 2017

In June, 1932, as the Depression wore  on, thousands of WWI veterans marched on Washington, DC, demanding a bonus payment promised to them in 1926 but not to be paid until 1945. 

"Gilmor's Raid"

Jul 13, 2017

In July, 1864, Major Harry Gilmor and his Confederate Calvary

 wrought havoc, burned bridges, and robbed trains north of Baltimore as the Confederate Army tried to gain ground in Maryland. 

After meeting at the Battle of Monacacy and surviving the Civil War, Union General Lew Wallace and Confederate General Jubal Early went on to influence popular culture, albeit in rather different ways. 

"King Kong"

Jun 29, 2017

A little known story behind the scenes of the making of the movie "King Kong" and its ties to Marlyand. 

"Front Royal"

Jun 22, 2017

On May 23, 1862, 1st Maryland Federal troops met and fought Confederate soldiers, also from Maryland, under the command of Stonewall Jackson at Front Royal. 

"The Mermaid"

Jun 14, 2017

In the Spring of 1778, during the war of Independence, 

the HMS Mermaid surrendered to residents of a small town along the Maryland coast rather than be taken as a prize of the French sailors chasing him.  

Politics and newspaper publishing prove a potent mix in the early 19th century in Baltimore. 

Captain John Smith's  exploration and exploits in the Chesapeake region. 

"Color Guard"

May 24, 2017

In 1864, black men from Baltimore and surrounding areas, both free and enslaved, volunteered to fight for the Union Army as soldiers of the 4th U.S. Colored Infantry. 

In the late 19th century, horse racing enthusiasts worked to bring world class horses and high stakes races to Baltimore. 

In 1816, a series of volcanic eruptions resulted in bizarre weather all over the world, with freezing temperatures, snow, and sleet, and catastrophic consequences. 

In May, 1861, in the wake of the Pratt Street Riots, Chief Justice Roger B. Taney issued a writ of habeas corpus for John Merryman, who had been imprisoned at Fort McHenry for his actions preventing the movement of Federal troops into Maryland. The decision became known as "Ex Parte Merryman," and was upheld by the Supreme Court in 1866. 

"Clara's Boys"

Apr 26, 2017

After the Pratt Street Riot in Baltimore, Clara Barton attended to the Massachusetts volunteers after their train arrived in Washington, DC, and went on to found the American Red Cross. 

"Monty R"

Apr 19, 2017

On April 13, 1940, Monty R, a "family pet" born and raised in Maryland horse country, defeated the favored thoroughbred Blockade at My Lady's Manor in a shocking upset. 

During the War of 1812, American sailors and soldiers were held in England's Dartmoor Prison, where they endured harsh conditions, meager rations, and cruel treatment. 

"Avalon"

Mar 29, 2017

The story of the founding of the Maryland colony in 1632 by Cecil Calvert, which followed a failed attempt by his father, George Calvert, to start another colony in 1620 called Avalon. 

On February 19, 1951, Joseph "Tunnel Joe" Holmes escaped from the Maryland State Penitentiary via a 70 foot long tunnel under the jail. 

"Mary Clocker"

Mar 9, 2017

In 1638, fourteen year old Mary Lawn sailed to America in search of a better life, beating the odds time and again in the rough and tumble world of colonial Maryland.  

"The Iron Duke"

Feb 15, 2017

In 1816, Marianne Patterson, while married to Robert Patterson of Baltimore, captures the heart of the Duke of Wellington. 

"The Slave Catchers"

Feb 8, 2017

The complicated, brutal, yet perfectly legal business of capturing runaway slaves who managed to make their way to freedom in Pennsylvania in 1849. 

"Aristocrat"

Feb 2, 2017

After traveling to Baltimore to help fight the Great Fire of 1904, New York firefighters took home a four-legged friend who never left their sides whilst they fought the blaze. 

During Prohibition, Maryland became known as "The  Free State"  due to widespread and  fiercely defiant attitudes about the production, sale and consumption of alcohol. 

"The Jungle"

Jan 12, 2017

In 1906, Upton Sinclair causes an uproar when he publishes his book "The Jungle," a shocking expose of the conditions in the meat packing industry. 

"Canajoharie"

Jan 4, 2017

In December, 1944, a lone squad of the 29th Division spent a quiet Christmas in a well-stocked German farmhouse, enjoying a brief respite from the bitter cold and constant fighting of the Battle of the Bulge. 

"The Bathtub Hoax"

Dec 29, 2016

A colorful "history" of the bathtub, as told by H. L. Mencken.   

"The Greatest Game"

Dec 22, 2016

On December 28, 1958, Johnny Unitas led the Baltimore Colts to victory over the New York Giants in what many still consider the greatest game of football ever played.   

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