Baltimore Riots 2015 | WYPR

Baltimore Riots 2015

Rachel Baye

Mechanics were already busy at work at the Full Circle Service Center in Halethorpe when 30-year-old Brandon Carroll walked in. He said he was late because he had to meet with his parole officer.

"I was incarcerated for about six years,” he said. “I was hanging around the wrong people and basically was a product of my environment. I got caught with a gun, and that set me down for a little while.”

Douglass Students Say They Got A Bad Rap

Apr 30, 2015

Students at Frederick Douglass High School bristled Wednesday at suggestions that they were involved in the riots that erupted near their school Monday after the funeral of 25-year-old Freddie Gray.

Updated at 11 a.m. ET

For the second night in a row, people in Baltimore appear to have mostly heeded a citywide curfew.

But solidarity protests resulted in dozens of arrests in New York, and police used pepper spray on demonstrators near the Colorado State Capitol in Denver. Other large protests were held in Seattle, Houston, Washington, Boston and Minneapolis.

On The Day After, Baltimoreans Shine

Apr 29, 2015
Mary Rose Madden

The intersection of North Ave. and Pennsylvania Ave. was a site of heartbreak on Monday night for many as the riot raged on.  On Tuesday, Baltimoreans were looking to help – and heal. Throughout the city, there were cleanups, prayer vigils, and meetups at community centers.  By the end of the day, you might have thought that Baltimoreans were exhausted. But that just wasn’t the case.

The streets of Baltimore were relatively clear after 10 o’clock on Tuesday night, due to a curfew instituted by Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Black after rioters destroyed buildings and set fires across the city.

In the Sandtown-Winchester neighborhood, home to Freddie Gray, where demonstrations throughout the day took on a fairly festive tone, many people streamed away as night fell and the curfew loomed. But a handful of activists committed to stay out and test the police.

Across Baltimore on Tuesday, volunteers and city workers fanned out to clean up damage caused by looters and riots last night after the funeral of 25-year-old Freddie Gray, who died from injuries suffered in police custody.

The streets of Baltimore were quieter Tuesday night, a day after vandalism and rioting forced officials to implement a curfew. Today, the Orioles plan to play an MLB game without an audience, and a woman who yanked her son away from potential trouble is making headlines.

Updated at 10:55 p.m. ET:

As the curfew declared by Baltimore's mayor goes into effect, a number of protesters — hundreds, according to The Associated Press — are refusing to leave the streets, and are facing off against gathered police officers.

Protesters threw objects at the police when they first advanced on the crowd, and police responded with smoke grenades and flash grenades at about 10:25 p.m.

To the southeast, National Guard troops could be seen stationed in the city's Inner Harbor entertainment district.

In the early morning, as the cold set in, Anaya Maze stood next to the charred remains of a CVS store.

Holding a sign, she was the only protester left in front of a line of police officers dressed in riot gear. She is petite. Still, she faced the police officers, looking at them intently.

A few steps away were the charred skeletons of two police vehicles, the victims of an unbridled anger that burned its way through the west side of Baltimore.