Baltimore | WYPR

Baltimore

Revitalization without gentrification: a lot of syllables to describe an elusive goal. In urban neighborhoods, development too often means poor, usually minority residents are priced out. Cities have wrestled with this problem for decades. Now a group of Baltimore housing advocates think they have the answer. They’re asking the city to issue tens of millions of dollars in bonds in support of their plan. What’s the big fix? Community land trusts. This development model has been gaining steam in other cities. Now, as Baltimore seeks to solve the many problems it’s become famous for in the wake of the death of Freddie Gray, advocates say community land trusts are key.

A new report by national nonprofit, the Corporation for Enterprise Development, finds that more than half of Baltimore families are “financially vulnerable.” This means a sudden job loss or medical emergency could knock them below the poverty line. Furthermore, half of the city’s households struggle to borrow money affordably, so they risk becoming trapped in debt by high interest rates. Arohi Pathek from CFED helps us compare this snapshot of Baltimore to Maryland’s overall picture. Plus, Sara Johnson, director of the Baltimore CASH Campaign, lays out policies with the potential to help low-income families - including ways to give them recognition for paying their bills on time.

Photo courtesy of candidate website

Today we welcome Deray Mckessoncontinuing our conversations with Baltimore’s 2016 mayoral candidates. The Black Lives Matter activist and former school administrator entered the Democratic primary minutes before the filing deadline. We’ll discuss the changes in policing and education Mckesson is calling for, and take your questions.

But first: Controversy at a Catholic university in western Maryland. Mount St. Mary’s student newspaper recently revealed a  plan to improve retention rates by weeding out struggling freshmen. Two faculty members critical of the plan were fired...and then reinstated. The faculty is calling for the president’s resignation. Scott Jaschik, founder of Inside Higher Ed, brings us the latest.

Kenneth Burns / WYPR

A sea change is coming to the Baltimore City Council: Nearly half the members are not seeking reelection this year. Three of the 15 are retiring, two are vacating their seats to run for mayor, and another is pursuing a judgeship. Luke Broadwater of The Baltimore Sun and WYPR news analyst Fraser Smith join us to discuss the implications.

Mosby Joins City Mayor’s Race

Oct 28, 2015

Baltimore City Councilman Nick Mosby announced Sunday his intention to run for mayor in 2016, citing a need for new ideas for the city.

Update at 4:10 p.m. ET. Blimp Is Down:

A runaway giant surveillance blimp that was tailed by F-16 fighter jets from Maryland to Pennsylvania is now down and under control, the North American Aerospace Defense Command said.

Nikki Krize, a reporter for WNEP-TV, tweeted a picture that showed part of the blimp tangled with some trees near Muncy, Pa.

NORAD said that the area of the crash had been secured and "a military recovery team is enroute."

4700 Liberty Heights Avenue

Oct 19, 2015
Wendel Patrick

The 4700 block of Liberty Heights Avenue is a portrait of survival and adaptability.  It's a self-governed, informal economy where the currency is respect.  Space is shared by merchants, churches, longtime residents, and drug dealers.  Immigrants from Afghanistan, Pakistan, Nepal, West Africa, and Korea have set up shops alongside a dwindling number of African American-owned businesses.  Trust is earned here, not given lightly.

Making Dollars And Sense Out Of City Rec Center Funding

Aug 27, 2015

  There are three options to pay for Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake’s $136 million plan to overhaul aging city rec centers. But no matter which one city leaders choose, at least one economist says they should choose wisely.

Slumlord and Communities Reach Settlement

Aug 21, 2015

A federal judge has approved a settlement between a Houston man who owns derelict properties in Baltimore and six city community associations in the first case using a state law that allows associations to sue the owners of blighted properties.

Scott Wizig and several limited liability companies that hold titles to more than 50 dilapidated homes throughout the city will be required to rehab the properties that can be saved and demolish the ones that can’t.  

The settlement was approved in federal bankruptcy court Tuesday.

Holton To Retire In 2016

Aug 18, 2015

City Councilwoman Helen Holton announced at the end of Monday’s council meeting she will not seek re-election in 2016 because of health reasons.

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