Donald Trump | WYPR

Donald Trump

Think Progress

For decades, the federal government has neglected the infrastructure of Baltimore and other urban areas across the country -- allowing sewage systems to leak, water pipes to burst, and roads to become pock-marked with holes.

So, when Donald Trump promised on the campaign trail last year that he would invest a trillion dollars rebuilding American infrastructure, it seemed like the one area where urbanites and suburbanites, Democrats and Republicans, Trump and even Bernie Sanders, could potentially agree. 

It’s a patriotic impulse:  We need to rebuild a crumbling America.  But then, last week, Trump held a press conference to announce his actual plans. As it turns out, instead of spending more taxpayer money to improve America’s roads, bridges and pipes, Trump plans to do to the opposite.


Rachel Baye

President Donald Trump’s proposed budget eliminates all of the Chesapeake Bay Program’s $73 million and reduces or eliminates several other funds used to clean up the Bay and its watershed.

On Thursday, leaders from the six states in the Chesapeake Bay Watershed — who together form the Chesapeake Executive Council — signed a resolution calling on Trump and Congress to replace that money in the budget and urging federal agencies to remain active participants in Bay restoration efforts.

Rachel Baye

Former NAACP President and CEO Ben Jealous has formally announced his plans to run for governor next year.

The 44-year-old Democrat and California native made the announcement Wednesday morning at a rally outside his cousin’s West Baltimore flower shop. His 24-minute speech highlighted his ties to Baltimore and a family legacy of civil rights activism, including his mother’s efforts to desegregate Western High School as a young teen.

Rachel Baye / WYPR

State lawmakers introduced a bill Tuesday that would prohibit internet service providers, such as Comcast and Verizon, from selling consumers’ private information. The measure would reverse the effects in the state of a congressional resolution President Donald Trump signed Monday.

Rachel Baye / WYPR

A bill passed Wednesday by the state Senate gives state Attorney General Brian Frosh up to $1 million to hire five attorneys to help his office challenge federal policy. The measure, which already passed the House, is a direct response to executive actions taken by President Donald Trump.

Trump budget eviscerates bay restoration funds

Mar 16, 2017

President Trump's budget blueprint to "Make American Great Again" cuts $73 million from EPA, the entire budget for the Chesapeake Bay Program, the multi-agency effort that oversees bay restoration programs.

The cuts would remove EPA oversight of the Chesapeake Bay's so-called pollution diet to clean up the bay and its streams, creeks and rivers and drew sharp rebukes from bay scientists.

Cummings meets Trump, is optimistic. Sort of

Mar 10, 2017
Howard County Library System via flickr

Congressman Elijah Cummings, a Baltimore Democrat, says he’s optimistic after having President Donald Trump’s ear earlier this week, at least on the subject of prescription drug prices.

Cummings, the top Democrat on the House Oversight Committee, said Trump agreed that drug companies "are in many instances charging these very unreasonable prices" and said "he thought it was just unfair to the American people."

Rachel Baye

Gov. Larry Hogan’s approval rating remains strong among Marylanders, with 63 percent of adults approving of the job he is doing, according to a new Goucher Poll out Monday.

Karen Hosler

Ben Cardin and Steny Hoyer have been close friends and allies since they were boy wonders of Maryland politics a half century ago. But now they may be facing their greatest challenge ever: protecting the country from what they call the missteps--or worse—of President Trump. 

Rachel Baye / WYPR

The Maryland House of Delegates voted along party lines Wednesday to make it easier for the state attorney general to sue the federal government.

Rachel Baye / WYPR

The Maryland House of Delegates is expected to vote Wednesday to expand the state attorney general’s powers so that he can sue the federal government.

Current law requires the governor or legislature to agree before the attorney general can bring a lawsuit. Democratic Attorney General Brian Frosh says he needs this change so that he can challenge many of President Donald Trump’s policies as quickly as the new president implements them.

Rachel Baye

Legislation expanding the state attorney general’s powers to sue the federal government advanced in the state Senate Thursday. But nine of the Senate’s 14 Republicans walked out before the vote to protest the Democratic majority rushing the measure through the body.

Rachel Baye

An initiative to give the Maryland attorney general the freedom to challenge federal policy in court earned initial approval by a state Senate committee on Wednesday. The legislation, expected to come up for a vote in the full Senate Thursday, is driven by concern about the policies likely to come from President Donald Trump's new administration.

The Governor's Office

Gov. Larry Hogan’s State of the State address Wednesday marked the halfway point in Hogan’s term.

The 25-minute speech focused heavily on Hogan’s legislative agenda, from expanding charter schools to tax breaks for public safety officials and military veterans. As Hogan named each of his priorities, he took a moment to reflect on what he has already accomplished before outlining what’s still left to do.

Rachel Baye

Democrats in Annapolis are preparing a slew of legislation and other initiatives that they say are direct responses to President Donald Trump and anticipated changes in federal policy. Among them is a bill that would make Maryland a sanctuary state for immigrants without legal status.

Rachel Baye

Roughly 2,000 people packed BWI Airport’s international terminal Sunday night to protest President Donald Trump’s recent executive order restricting immigration.

People came from across the Washington and Baltimore metro areas. There were families with young children, and people of all races and religions.

Taking on Trump in Baltimore County classrooms

Jan 20, 2017
John Lee

It was the day before the inauguration of Donald Trump, and students in Sandra Skordalos’s 12th grade A-P government class were debating the President-elect’s actions. These students at Patapsco High School and Center for the Arts in Dundalk were not giving Trump an easy time.

Yara Daraiseh scoffed at Trump for not understanding the Presidency, treating it as though he will be the CEO calling all of the shots.

"But when you’re a president of a democratic government … you don’t have all the power," she said.

Fraser Smith and Andy Green, of the Baltimore Sun's editorial board, talk about how Gov. Larry Hogan reacts to the incoming administration of President-elect Donald Trump.

Fraser Smith and Kenneth Burns, of the WYPR news team, talk about the Christmas wish list newly inaugurated Mayor Catherine Pugh delivered to President-elect Donald Trump when he was in town for the Army-Navy game.

Undocumented immigrants face uncertainty

Dec 12, 2016
Jonna McKone

President-elect Donald Trump promised during his campaign to get tough on immigration.

Among other things, his campaign website promised to build an “impenetrable physical wall” on our southern border and he has promised to terminate President Obama’s program that protects undocumented immigrants who came to the U.S. as children from deportation.

And that has raised anxiety levels in immigrant communities throughout the country as well as in Baltimore. “It’s very scary right now in our community,” said Nathaly Uribe Robledo, who entered the United States illegally as a child in 1997. “A lot of people are very afraid.  They are not sure what’s going happen.” 

Rachel Baye

Baltimore Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake promised on Thursday that immigrants will continue to be welcome in Charm City, and that the city police will not be actively checking immigration status.

The promises were a reaction to President-elect Donald Trump’s proposed immigration policies and could cost Baltimore some of its federal funding.

Ted Eytan

Six days ago, Americans elected Donald Trump to be the 45th president of the United States. Almost immediately after the election results were in, anti-Trump protests and rallies sprung up in cities across the country including here in Baltimore. People are taking to social media to express their dissent, using hashtags like #NotMyPresident. Despite calls for unity from President Obama, Sec. Hillary Clinton and the President-elect himself, it doesn’t seem likely that the anti-Trump sentiments will dissipate anytime soon.

So, how do the more than 64 million Americans who did NOT vote for Trump, come together, and reconcile their moral and ethical stances given Donald Trump’s consistently offensive rhetoric over the last 18 months? 

Jonna McKone

 

 

Hundreds of protesters gathered in Baltimore’s Station North neighborhood last night to voice their frustration with Donald Trump’s victory over Hillary Clinton in the race for president.

 

Police, who estimated the crowd at upwards of 600, said the protesters were mostly orderly, though some blocked roadways and sat down in the streets.

 

Officers detained three people, two men and a woman. The men were released, but the woman, identified as Stephanie Applegate, 25, of the 1600 block of Charmuth Road in Lutherville, was charged with failure to obey the lawful order of a police officer.

Jonna McKone

Election Day is just a week away and WYPR reporters have been talking to voters around the state about the candidates for president for our series, Maryland Voices.

Fraser Smith and John Lee, of the WYPR reporting team, talk about what the presidential candidates aren't saying about climate change.

Rachel Baye

  

In Western Maryland, politics can be a sensitive subject.

CNN

Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump could not disagree more on climate change. Clinton, the Democratic presidential nominee, sees it as a real threat while Trump, the Republican, dismisses it as a hoax.

And because climate change can lead to rising sea level, among other things, their views on the subject are important to those who live and work on the Chesapeake Bay.

Fraser Smith and Todd Eberly, of the political science faculty at St. Mary's College of Maryland, talk about GOP nominee Donald Trump's refusal to say whether he'll accept the results of next month's election.

Youtube

If you go around asking people who they plan to vote for, for president this year, you will find many are passionate about their choices. And that choice often has a lot to do with not liking the other candidate.

Take Liz Freedman, who lives in Reisterstown and plans to vote for Hillary Clinton.

"I could never vote for Donald Trump," Freedman said. "He is a misogynist."

Then there is Ed Aldridge, who lives in Essex.

"Trump all the way," he said. "Hillary will run the country into the ground."

How much longer?

Oct 13, 2016
Tom Chalkley

WYPR's senior news analyst asks the question many of us are asking. Can this election please be over?

Pages