Donald Trump | WYPR

Donald Trump

Rachel Baye

Baltimore Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake promised on Thursday that immigrants will continue to be welcome in Charm City, and that the city police will not be actively checking immigration status.

The promises were a reaction to President-elect Donald Trump’s proposed immigration policies and could cost Baltimore some of its federal funding.

Ted Eytan

Six days ago, Americans elected Donald Trump to be the 45th president of the United States. Almost immediately after the election results were in, anti-Trump protests and rallies sprung up in cities across the country including here in Baltimore. People are taking to social media to express their dissent, using hashtags like #NotMyPresident. Despite calls for unity from President Obama, Sec. Hillary Clinton and the President-elect himself, it doesn’t seem likely that the anti-Trump sentiments will dissipate anytime soon.

So, how do the more than 64 million Americans who did NOT vote for Trump, come together, and reconcile their moral and ethical stances given Donald Trump’s consistently offensive rhetoric over the last 18 months? 

Jonna McKone

 

 

Hundreds of protesters gathered in Baltimore’s Station North neighborhood last night to voice their frustration with Donald Trump’s victory over Hillary Clinton in the race for president.

 

Police, who estimated the crowd at upwards of 600, said the protesters were mostly orderly, though some blocked roadways and sat down in the streets.

 

Officers detained three people, two men and a woman. The men were released, but the woman, identified as Stephanie Applegate, 25, of the 1600 block of Charmuth Road in Lutherville, was charged with failure to obey the lawful order of a police officer.

Jonna McKone

Election Day is just a week away and WYPR reporters have been talking to voters around the state about the candidates for president for our series, Maryland Voices.

Fraser Smith and John Lee, of the WYPR reporting team, talk about what the presidential candidates aren't saying about climate change.

Rachel Baye

  

In Western Maryland, politics can be a sensitive subject.

CNN

Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump could not disagree more on climate change. Clinton, the Democratic presidential nominee, sees it as a real threat while Trump, the Republican, dismisses it as a hoax.

And because climate change can lead to rising sea level, among other things, their views on the subject are important to those who live and work on the Chesapeake Bay.

Fraser Smith and Todd Eberly, of the political science faculty at St. Mary's College of Maryland, talk about GOP nominee Donald Trump's refusal to say whether he'll accept the results of next month's election.

Youtube

If you go around asking people who they plan to vote for, for president this year, you will find many are passionate about their choices. And that choice often has a lot to do with not liking the other candidate.

Take Liz Freedman, who lives in Reisterstown and plans to vote for Hillary Clinton.

"I could never vote for Donald Trump," Freedman said. "He is a misogynist."

Then there is Ed Aldridge, who lives in Essex.

"Trump all the way," he said. "Hillary will run the country into the ground."

How much longer?

Oct 13, 2016
Tom Chalkley

WYPR's senior news analyst asks the question many of us are asking. Can this election please be over?

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