The Morning Economic Report | WYPR

The Morning Economic Report

Jon Welsh/flickr

While there are many stakeholders who are upbeat regarding near-term U.S. economic prospects, expected improvement remains speculative. Last year, the U.S. economy expanded just 1.6 percent, though the year’s second half was better. Many economists continue to wonder if average growth of around 2 percent remains the best for which we can hope.  

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steve p2008/flickr

As a reflection of a reasonably strong economy, Americans are once again flying in large numbers. In fact, U.S. and foreign airlines carried a record number of passengers in 2016 according to the U.S. Department of Transportation. 

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Jon Tucker/flickr

Despite indications of an improving economy and labor market, recent research indicates that recent college graduates continue to struggle with a lack of wage gains since the recession.  The bachelor’s degree has long been considered the ticket to the American middle class, but has arguably lost some of its mystique recently.  

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Mark Goebel/flickr

You may have heard of the so-called North Carolina Bathroom Bill. Many people didn’t like the policy and responded by withdrawing economic activity from that state. The Associated Press estimates that North Carolina’s bathroom bill will cost the state nearly $4 billion in lost business over a dozen years.

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Matt Acevedo/flickr

Perhaps you’ve lived through the following situation – an acquaintance tells you that a common friend, perhaps someone you went to school with or once worked alongside, is now making a lot of money. You ask, well where do they live? They say New York, and you say, well then they’re really not making that much are they?  

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Erich Ferdinand/flickr

Men are in decline. That seems like a strange thing to say when one considers that last year, nearly 96 percent of all Fortune 500 CEOs were male. But on the other end of the spectrum, men are dropping out of the labor force in large numbers and falling behind women in terms of both college attendance and graduation rates.

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Katherine Seery/flickr

A new working paper published by The National Bureau of Economic Research indicates that there are double standards in the nation’s financial advisory industry when it comes to disciplining men versus women. The paper is entitled “When Harry Fired Sally: The Double Standard in Punishing Misconduct."

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Kathryn Decker/flickr

There was a time several years ago when the job market was flooded with eager applicants. Many people had lost their jobs, unemployment was elevated, and large numbers of college graduates added to the volume of job seekers. As indicated by Bloomberg, during and after the recession, many employers began requiring college degrees for entry level jobs. That was then, this is now.

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James Tipton/flickr

Recent data from the Job Opportunities and Labor Turnover Survey or JOLTS indicate that the U.S. labor market continues to strengthen. Though the JOLTS report is a month behind the highly publicized monthly employment report supplied by the Labor Department, it is still followed by economists because of the additional insights it provides. The most recent report indicates that both the rate of hiring and quitting jobs rose in early 2017.  

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WalrusWaltz/flickr

There has been considerable discussion in recent months about the role of immigrants in American society.  Some of this discussion may have made people wonder if the U.S. is as open to people from other parts of the world as it once was. Apparently, many people, including students, have come to the conclusion that America has, at least for now, become a less desirable destination.

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