On the Record | WYPR

On the Record

thebaltimorebeat.com

At a time when many weeklies, and even daily print publications are folding, Baltimore is home to a new weekly newspaper, The Baltimore Beat. We meet editor-in-chief Lisa Snowden-McCray, to learn how it differs from now-defunct City Paper ... as well as what readers can look forward to, and her hopes to increase diversity in the newsroom.

Here is journalist Wil Hylton’s Stoop story about the importance of following a hunch … and being open to hear the truth when you get there. Hylton is a contributing writer for The New York Times Magazine, and the author of Vanished. Don’t miss the next Stoop show, “Breaking with Tradition: Stories about Unconventional Holidays” coming up on Tuesday, December 12, 7:00 pm at The Senator Theatre.

Summer Skyes 11 Creative Commons

Recent Johns Hopkins research suggests the physical activity of 19-year-olds is on par with that of 60 year-olds. The study’s senior author, Vadim Zipunnikov discusses the ramifications of such a sedentary lifestyle, and Julie Lincoln, senior fitness director at the YMCA of Central Maryland, talks about innovative programs that motivate kids to get up and move.

“...It is not if we will experience darkness in a life well lived. It is when.” So writes Dr. Robert Wicks, a psychologist who helps caregivers deal with secondary stress. His new book is “Night Call: Embracing Compassion and Hope in a Troubled World”. We discuss his approach to building resiliency.

Flickr Creative Commons

An estimated 20,000 surgeons in the U.S. are over 70--no more immune than the rest of us from weaker vision, slower hand-eye coordination or forgetfulness. Yet there’s not a clear system for telling a doctor it’s time to retire from surgery. Dr. Mark Katlic, chair of surgery at LifeBridge Health Sinai Hospital, has devised a two-day evaluation to test the physical and mental fitness of surgeons. It's called the Aging Surgeons Program. We also talk with Dr. Herbert Dardik, who resisted the testing but now is a strong proponent. 

Cocaine in your cough drops, tobacco in your toothpaste. Internist Dr. Lydia Kang tells us about mystifying medical practices of yesteryear. Her new book is, “Quackery: A Brief History of the Worst Ways to Cure Everything”.

Here’s a Stoop Story from Kate Hanlon, about her younger sister, their loving mother, and a Nike sweatshirt. You can hear this story and many others at stoopstorytelling.com, as well as the Stoop podcast.

The next live Stoop show is November 16th at 8 pm the Creative Alliance. The theme is, "My Freaky Family". Tickets available here.

Whether it is gathering dust in a drawer or worn every day, nearly every one owns jewelry. And real or fake, this form of ornamentation has a story to tell. Shane Prada, director of the Baltimore Jewelry Center, tells us about a new exhibition, Radical Jewelry Makeover: Baltimore, that takes cast-off pieces and gives them new life. And Artist Mary Fissell describes the appeal of jewelry making.

Radical Jewelry Makeover: Baltimore is on display at the Baltimore Jewelry Center until February 4.

Returning combat veterans often wrestle with post-traumatic stress disorder, the aftermath of brain injuries or chronic pain. Relief can be fleeting. Dr. Carol Bowman, medical director for patient and family-centered care at Veterans Affairs, tells us about holistic therapies used successfully to treat military veterans. We also meet Renee Dixon, executive director of Freedom Hills Therapeutic Riding program in Cecil County, and participant Don Koss, a Vietnam vet, to learn how just being near horses can have a calming effect.

Lisa Nickerson/Kennedy Krieger Institute

When an adult has a stroke, signs and symptoms are often recognizable. But what if the victim is a toddler? Or an infant … someone who may not be able to sense or communicate that something is amiss? Pediatric stroke is more common than you think. We hear from Dr. Frank Pidcock, medical director of Kennedy Krieger Institute's ‘Constraint Induced Movement Therapy’ program. Then we visit Brooklynn, who suffered a stroke at the age of one and a half, and her mother, Nikki Wolcott at a therapy session.

Ivy Bookshop

In his new history: "Revolution Song: A Story of American Freedom," Russell Shorto Russell Shorto traces the disparate lives of six people in the 18th century, from slave to general to aristocrat … and what freedom and the American Revolution meant to each of them. We meet a black man enslaved in Africa who engineers his freedom in America and an Indian warrior steering between his instincts and the will of his people. There’s an English aristocrat, an American-born daughter of a British officer , a shoemaker who becomes a local politician, and a Virginia planter named Washington. Shorto writes that we are still fighting the Revolution.

Bruno Fazenda / Flickr via Creative Commons

More than 4,600 children in Maryland live in out-of-home placements such as foster care, and studies show that LGBT youth tend to be overrepresented in the foster system.

Judith Schagrin is the assistant director for children’s services for Baltimore County. She gives us an overview of the training potential foster parents undergo. And we hear from former foster youth who identify as LGBT.

Did their sexual orientation affect their experiences? Did they feel prepared when they left foster care? How does Baltimore County ensure foster parents stand by ALL children?

Over nearly five decades, BrickHouse Books has nurtured scores of authors whose voices might otherwise not have heard. It’s arguably the oldest continually operating small book publisher in Maryland. Since 1973 (circa photo), poet and author Clarinda Harriss has been BrickHouse’s editor and driving force … creating subdivisions to publish poetry and LGBT manuscripts. Proceeds from sales get reinvested in the next book. What keeps Harriss at it?

Here’s a stoop story from Joe Sugarman about becoming a father for the second time … and how he and his wife followed their birth plan a little too by-the-book. You can hear his story and others at StoopStorytelling.com

A month into office, President Trump declared the press to be the enemy of the American people. By several measures, hostility against journalists is ratcheting up. Beth Am Synagogue has asked four journalists to analyze “press freedoms under siege.”

We’ll hear from Ben Jacobs, a reporter who was bodyslammed by a Republican congressional candidate last spring, And TV producer David Simon, a former Baltimore Sun reporter, who will kick off the series this weekend.

Scout out talented students at HBCUs, prepare them for the rigors of law school, mentor them throughout their careers. The Fannie Angelos Program for Academic Excellence aims to boost diversity in the legal profession.

We hear from the co-founders, University of Baltimore law professors Michael Higginbotham and Michael Meyerson, and we meet two graduates at the start of their law careers, Annice Brown and Keon Eubanks.

Johns Hopkins Center for Diagnostic Excellence

Each year an estimated 12 million Americans get the wrong diagnosis from their doctor--a medical problem is seen as something else, missed entirely or identified late. Most of the diagnostic errors are not about rare diseases, and in about one third of these cases the results of the error are serious, even fatal. Neurologist Dr. David Newman-Toker joins us to talk about the new Johns Hopkins Center for Diagnostic Excellence at the Armstrong Institute for Patient Safety and Quality. They aim to improve how diagnoses are made. Dr. Newman-Toker, who heads the center, also shares actions a patient can take to improve their odds.

As suicide rates approach a 30-year high, researchers are working to pinpoint the causes of suicide attempts and, determine how to keep people who are vulnerable to suicide... from access to the most lethal means of completing that act-- firearms. We hear from Dr. Paul Nestadt, psychiatrist and post-doctoral fellow at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. His research compares urban and rural suicide rates in Maryland.

Walters Art Museum

Though the name sounds foreboding, the Mexican holiday Dia de los Muertos, or Day of the Dead, is in fact a celebration of life. The Walters Art Museum has built a traditional altar, or ofrenda … and has planned several events to bring the holiday to life in Baltimore. We talk with Amanda Kodek, Director of Education, and Alexander Jarman, Manager of Adult and Community Programs, to learn about the activities, and the holiday itself. Creative Alliance also has many Dia de los Muertos activities planned, and you can learn more about them here.

On today's look back at the Stoop, Debra Diamond, Wall Street money manager turned psychic, medium and medical intuitive tells about the day she discovered these extrasensory gifts. You can hear her story and others at StoopStorytelling.com.

PBS Against All Odds

When it comes to daily headlines, the black middle class is nearly invisible. The news tends to focus on dysfunction in poor black neighborhoods, confrontations with police, disappointing achievements in urban schools. There's a lot missing from that narrative. To find out more, we talk with journalist Bob Herbert, who wrote and produced the documentary “Against All Odds: The Fight for a Black Middle Class.” He brings decades of reporting and analysis together to explain what African-American families have confronted in pursuing the American Dream. Please note, the local screening and panel discussion of this event at the Parkway Theater is SOLD OUT.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

In 1932 the U.S. Public Health Service enlisted African-American men in Macon County, Alabama in a syphilis study. The men weren’t asked for informed consent -- and were told they would get treatment. They didn’t, even after penicillin was shown to cure syphilis.

We meet Peter Buxtun, a public health employee who discovered in the 1960s what was happening and bioethicist Nancy Kass, from Johns Hopkins’ Berman Institute, explains how Buxtun’s whistleblower helped shape the rules and regulations surrounding research today.

Peter Buxtun will be speaking at UMBC tomorrow at 4 pm in Lecture Hall 1 in the Biological Sciences Building.

The Samaritan Women's Facebook Page

For the past decade, survivors of domestic sex trafficking have found refuge at The Samaritan Women, a program in Baltimore that offers long-term housing and therapy.

Founder Jeanne Allert tells us why she was drawn to serve women who’ve experienced such exploitation and about The Samaritan Women’s spiritual focus. And we hear from two survivors - Cici and Alex - who are rebuilding their lives and planning for the future with the help of The Samaritan Women.

If the Trump presidency seems to be unfolding like a firehose of tweets and hysterical headlines, stay tuned for two experts who are looking to put it in context. Pulitzer-Prize-winning presidential historian Jon Meacham finds fundamental contrasts between the 45th chief executive and the 41st, the first President Bush.

And political scientist Todd Eberly of St. Mary’s College of Maryland has just co-authored a book titled "The Trump Presidency: Outsider in the Oval Office". Eberly will be speaking at 7:30 pm on November 7 on campus in the Daugherty-Palmer Commons building. 

Iraqi Jewish Archives

During a search for weapons of mass destruction in 2003, it was discovered that Saddam Hussein’s intelligence headquarters held priceless artifacts ... then the building was bombed and burst water pipes and flooded the basement nearly destroying the contents. Marvin Pinkert, the director The Jewish Museum of Maryland, tells the story behind the dramatic rescue of these artifacts, several of which are featured in the museum's latest exhibit, “Discovery and Recovery: Preserving Iraqi Jewish Heritage.” The centuries-old records detail communal life, religious practices and eventual persecution of Jews in Iraq.

Louis Blank tells the story about how even the uninvited guests to his wedding felt special. Don't miss the Stoop’s season kickoff, The Stoop in The Dark: Stories about the Unseen, Unknown, and Untold, Thursday, October 26, 7:00 pm at the The Senator Theatre. You can find information and more stories at stoopstorytelling dot com.

The Sixth Branch

Few neighborhood rebuilding groups can claim they’re driven by a military sense of purpose. Today we hear from Rich Moore, founder of The Sixth Branch in Baltimore. He and Scott Goldman, the nonprofit's executive director talk about how the group channels the leadership skills and commitment of military veterans to serve local communities through organizing, building and maintaining projects. Regina Hammond, joins us too, to talk about the lasting impact The Sixth Branch has had on the Johnson Square neighborhood. Find out how you can get involved here.

Dean Shareski / Flickr via Creative Commons

One of the most common learning disabilities - dyslexia - complicates how a child learns to read and write. Because their brains are wired differently, students with dyslexia are at risk of falling behind their peers.

A radio documentary by APM Reports - Hard to Read: How American Schools Fail Kids with Dyslexia -  highlights the challenges dyslexic students in Baltimore County face in getting the services they need. Producer Emily Hanford tells us how the great debate over how to teach reading is leaving kids behind.

And Pamela Guest, an advocate with Decoding Dyslexia - Marylanddescribes the frustration of watching her son struggle to read. Guest is also the editor of IEP Magazine.

After a devastating fire in March 2016, The Book Thing--a free book depot--is back! Founder Russell Wattenberg tells us about the path to rebuilding and how the community stepped up.

The Station North Tool Library Facebook page

Not-so handy around tools? No worries: the Station North Tool Library has tools and classes for every level of workshop experience. Co-founder Piper Watson tells about the 3,000 tools the library has on offer and the wide variety of its members. The first-ever Fix It Fair is October 21st from 11 am - 3 pm at 417 E Oliver St.

Pages