On the Record | WYPR

On the Record

Helen Glazer

Artists have always drawn inspiration from nature. The grace of a crashing ocean wave, the warm palette of autumn leaves, the luminescence of a full moon. But … a stark, snow and ice-covered tundra? That’s where photographer and sculptor, Helen Glazer, toured and made images over the course of seven weeks as part of the ‘Antarctic Artists and Writers’ program. She won the grant from the National Science Foundation in 2015. Her exhibit, Walking in Antarctica, is on display through January 12, 2018 at the Rosenberg Gallery at Goucher College.

Here's a Stoop Story by Meg Adams, talking about her travels to Antarctica and finding the warm feeling of home, even in a frozen tundra. You can hear her story and others at stoopstorytelling.com

Robert Shetterly americanswhotellthetruth.org

Baltimore welcomes a new discussion series that promises ‘conversation with a purpose.' It's called Great Talk. Co-founder Diane Davison gives us an overview, and we meet former National Security Agency executive and whistleblower, Thomas Drake. He will headline the panel for the inaugural event next week, titled: ‘Cyber Wars, the Secrets, the Spies’. A few years into his tenure at the NSA, Drake brought concerns about wasteful spending and questionable surveillance to his superiors, ... but was thwarted, then charged with espionage ... His life hasn't been the same.

Open Society Institute Baltimore

Combining his longtime advocacy for people with disabilities and his criminal law background, 2017 ‘Open Society Institute Baltimore’ fellow, Munib Lohrasbi plans to create the ‘Prisoner Protection and Advocacy Committee.’ Working in partnership with Disability Rights Maryland, Lohrasbi will perform site visits and observe how intake screenings are done; then he’ll compile and disseminate the data. OSI is a nonprofit that focuses on addressing the needs of Baltimore’s underserved communities and supporting innovative solutions to longstanding problems. 

Earrings. Necklaces. Tote bags. T-shirts. Fashionable, locally made, and designed by young people. ‘Youth in Business’ is an arts and business program that teaches young people how to create, market, and sell art products. It operates under the umbrella organization Jubilee Arts, which offers arts programming to the residents of Sandtown-Winchester, Upton, and surrounding neighborhoods.

We talk with Kim Loper, a community artist and former Americorps Fellow with Jubilee Arts. As one of this year’s ‘Open Society Institute Baltimore’ fellows, Kim will be working to expand Youth In Business into a design collective. We also meet Laila Amin, a sophomore at the Islamic Community School in West Baltimore who participates in the project.

The nonprofit Open Society Institute has awarded ten grants for community projects. We hear from one of the fellows, Ryan Flanigan, about the Remington Community Land Trust, an effort to create affordable home-buying access for low-income residents. And Terrell Askew, a resident of Remington and a member of the Greater Remington Improvement Association, shares his thoughts on preserving the neighborhood's character.

With no end in sight to the opioid overdose epidemic, the oversight committee of the U.S. Congress will hold a field hearing at Johns Hopkins Hospital this afternoon--to look at how the Trump administration is responding to the crisis. We speak to the committee’s top Democratic, Baltimore Congressman Elijah Cummings.

In some ways, caregiving is the new normal. One in four U.S. adult children provides unpaid care to an aging adult -- everything from hands-on physical care to shopping and household help. It can be exhausting, but it can also be a platform for a meaningful life, and a springboard to better understanding how you yourself will age, and how you can shape the kind of old age you want.

Ann Kaiser Stearns, a professor of behavioral science at the Community College of Baltimore County, combines research, insights and problem-solving tips in her new book, "Redefining Aging: A Caregiver’s Guide to Living Your Best Life".

Professor Stearns will be speaking about it Wednesday at noon at the Hatton Senior Center in Canton, part of the Enoch Pratt Free Library’s “Writers Live” series.

Eric Beatty, who dreamed about life as a father, but as a divorced dad didn’t think it would come true for him. After 18 years of marriage he moved into a house five minutes from his ex, and set out to co-raise their three kids, Dylan, Georgia and Sam. Here’s some of what he learned along the way.

You can hear other Stoop stories and the Stoop podcast at stoopstorytelling.com.

Thomas Hawk / Flickr via Creative Commons

Under President Trump, the U.S. Justice Department announced it will pursue tougher criminal charges and tighter adherence to mandatory minimum sentences than during the Obama years. We listen back to a conversation recorded this summer with retired federal Judge Alexander Williams Jr., about the life sentence he was required to impose in a drug case in Prince George’s County -- and with the man he sentenced, Evans Ray Jr., now free on clemency from President Obama. This program originally aired on June 26, 2017.

Click here for more information about the Judge Alexander Williams, Jr. Center for Education, Justice and Ethics at the University of Maryland.

Dennis Wong / Flickr via Creative Commons

Why do some smells repel us more than others … and why do some immediately trigger a memory? How does our sense of smell interact with other senses, like hearing and sight? Why does an older woman, if her sense of smell grows less acute, have a smaller social circle -- but the same is not true of older men? We talk about all that and more with Johan Lundstrom, a cognitive psychologist who does research at the Monell Chemical Sense Center in Philadelphia and the Karolinska Institutet in Stockholm, Sweden. Original air date: 7.17.17

Alex Ionno / Flickr via Creative Commons

Each week several dozen people in Maryland die from opioid use. Last summer, Nicki Neirman, a nursing staff coordinator, lost her fiance to a heroin overdose. She tells us of his episodes of treatment, and how his addiction disrupted their lives.

MICA

Digital, analog. One player, multi-player. Humans love games. We may not realize how much a part of our lives they are, and how much Baltimore is a hub for creating games. Jonathan Moriarty, chair of a non-profit for developers, tells us about Baltimore’s booming game industry, and what supports it. MICA has a game designer-in-residence. This year it’s Lishan AZ, who blends real life and digital in a project that explores the life of journalist Ida B. Wells. And the head of MICA’s game-design program, Jason Corace, tells us how play builds empathy.

thebaltimorebeat.com

At a time when many weeklies, and even daily print publications are folding, Baltimore is home to a new weekly newspaper, The Baltimore Beat. We meet editor-in-chief Lisa Snowden-McCray, to learn how it differs from now-defunct City Paper ... as well as what readers can look forward to, and her hopes to increase diversity in the newsroom.

Here is journalist Wil Hylton’s Stoop story about the importance of following a hunch … and being open to hear the truth when you get there. Hylton is a contributing writer for The New York Times Magazine, and the author of Vanished. Don’t miss the next Stoop show, “Breaking with Tradition: Stories about Unconventional Holidays” coming up on Tuesday, December 12, 7:00 pm at The Senator Theatre.

Summer Skyes 11 Creative Commons

Recent Johns Hopkins research suggests the physical activity of 19-year-olds is on par with that of 60 year-olds. The study’s senior author, Vadim Zipunnikov discusses the ramifications of such a sedentary lifestyle, and Julie Lincoln, senior fitness director at the YMCA of Central Maryland, talks about innovative programs that motivate kids to get up and move.

“...It is not if we will experience darkness in a life well lived. It is when.” So writes Dr. Robert Wicks, a psychologist who helps caregivers deal with secondary stress. His new book is “Night Call: Embracing Compassion and Hope in a Troubled World”. We discuss his approach to building resiliency.

Flickr Creative Commons

An estimated 20,000 surgeons in the U.S. are over 70--no more immune than the rest of us from weaker vision, slower hand-eye coordination or forgetfulness. Yet there’s not a clear system for telling a doctor it’s time to retire from surgery. Dr. Mark Katlic, chair of surgery at LifeBridge Health Sinai Hospital, has devised a two-day evaluation to test the physical and mental fitness of surgeons. It's called the Aging Surgeons Program. We also talk with Dr. Herbert Dardik, who resisted the testing but now is a strong proponent. 

Cocaine in your cough drops, tobacco in your toothpaste. Internist Dr. Lydia Kang tells us about mystifying medical practices of yesteryear. Her new book is, “Quackery: A Brief History of the Worst Ways to Cure Everything”.

Here’s a Stoop Story from Kate Hanlon, about her younger sister, their loving mother, and a Nike sweatshirt. You can hear this story and many others at stoopstorytelling.com, as well as the Stoop podcast.

The next live Stoop show is November 16th at 8 pm the Creative Alliance. The theme is, "My Freaky Family". Tickets available here.

Whether it is gathering dust in a drawer or worn every day, nearly every one owns jewelry. And real or fake, this form of ornamentation has a story to tell. Shane Prada, director of the Baltimore Jewelry Center, tells us about a new exhibition, Radical Jewelry Makeover: Baltimore, that takes cast-off pieces and gives them new life. And Artist Mary Fissell describes the appeal of jewelry making.

Radical Jewelry Makeover: Baltimore is on display at the Baltimore Jewelry Center until February 4.

Returning combat veterans often wrestle with post-traumatic stress disorder, the aftermath of brain injuries or chronic pain. Relief can be fleeting. Dr. Carol Bowman, medical director for patient and family-centered care at Veterans Affairs, tells us about holistic therapies used successfully to treat military veterans. We also meet Renee Dixon, executive director of Freedom Hills Therapeutic Riding program in Cecil County, and participant Don Koss, a Vietnam vet, to learn how just being near horses can have a calming effect.

Lisa Nickerson/Kennedy Krieger Institute

When an adult has a stroke, signs and symptoms are often recognizable. But what if the victim is a toddler? Or an infant … someone who may not be able to sense or communicate that something is amiss? Pediatric stroke is more common than you think. We hear from Dr. Frank Pidcock, medical director of Kennedy Krieger Institute's ‘Constraint Induced Movement Therapy’ program. Then we visit Brooklynn, who suffered a stroke at the age of one and a half, and her mother, Nikki Wolcott at a therapy session.

Ivy Bookshop

In his new history: "Revolution Song: A Story of American Freedom," Russell Shorto Russell Shorto traces the disparate lives of six people in the 18th century, from slave to general to aristocrat … and what freedom and the American Revolution meant to each of them. We meet a black man enslaved in Africa who engineers his freedom in America and an Indian warrior steering between his instincts and the will of his people. There’s an English aristocrat, an American-born daughter of a British officer , a shoemaker who becomes a local politician, and a Virginia planter named Washington. Shorto writes that we are still fighting the Revolution.

Bruno Fazenda / Flickr via Creative Commons

More than 4,600 children in Maryland live in out-of-home placements such as foster care, and studies show that LGBT youth tend to be overrepresented in the foster system.

Judith Schagrin is the assistant director for children’s services for Baltimore County. She gives us an overview of the training potential foster parents undergo. And we hear from former foster youth who identify as LGBT.

Did their sexual orientation affect their experiences? Did they feel prepared when they left foster care? How does Baltimore County ensure foster parents stand by ALL children?

Over nearly five decades, BrickHouse Books has nurtured scores of authors whose voices might otherwise not have heard. It’s arguably the oldest continually operating small book publisher in Maryland. Since 1973 (circa photo), poet and author Clarinda Harriss has been BrickHouse’s editor and driving force … creating subdivisions to publish poetry and LGBT manuscripts. Proceeds from sales get reinvested in the next book. What keeps Harriss at it?

Here’s a stoop story from Joe Sugarman about becoming a father for the second time … and how he and his wife followed their birth plan a little too by-the-book. You can hear his story and others at StoopStorytelling.com

A month into office, President Trump declared the press to be the enemy of the American people. By several measures, hostility against journalists is ratcheting up. Beth Am Synagogue has asked four journalists to analyze “press freedoms under siege.”

We’ll hear from Ben Jacobs, a reporter who was bodyslammed by a Republican congressional candidate last spring, And TV producer David Simon, a former Baltimore Sun reporter, who will kick off the series this weekend.

Scout out talented students at HBCUs, prepare them for the rigors of law school, mentor them throughout their careers. The Fannie Angelos Program for Academic Excellence aims to boost diversity in the legal profession.

We hear from the co-founders, University of Baltimore law professors Michael Higginbotham and Michael Meyerson, and we meet two graduates at the start of their law careers, Annice Brown and Keon Eubanks.

Johns Hopkins Center for Diagnostic Excellence

Each year an estimated 12 million Americans get the wrong diagnosis from their doctor--a medical problem is seen as something else, missed entirely or identified late. Most of the diagnostic errors are not about rare diseases, and in about one third of these cases the results of the error are serious, even fatal. Neurologist Dr. David Newman-Toker joins us to talk about the new Johns Hopkins Center for Diagnostic Excellence at the Armstrong Institute for Patient Safety and Quality. They aim to improve how diagnoses are made. Dr. Newman-Toker, who heads the center, also shares actions a patient can take to improve their odds.

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