Red Line | WYPR

Red Line

Baltimore Link debuts

Jun 20, 2017
John Lee

There was a lot of talk about numbers and colors at Baltimore’s bus stops Monday morning as the city’s newly revamped system of bus routes got its first test.

Dubbed BaltmoreLink, the system went into effect in the pre-dawn hours of Sunday, but it wasn’t until the Monday morning rush that planners and riders got the first real sense of it. And Alice McClellan, who uses a cane, was not happy.

John Lee

Baltimore’s newly revamped system of bus routes got its first real test during the Monday morning rush.

And while it’s designed to be quicker and more efficient and to get commuter closer to their jobs, it didn’t go all that well for Rodney Bennett, who was making his way from his home in North Baltimore to work in Cherry Hill.

His first bus was 10 minutes late.

flickr.com/dougtone

Just in time for Halloween, the ghost of the Red Line appeared as Baltimore County officials gave the state their wish list of transportation projects.

This comes as state transportation officials boast of a record number of road construction projects under way throughout Maryland, even if they do cause traffic jams.

Fraser Smith and Rachel Baye, of the WYPR reporting team, talk about how a group of Democrats want to use a wide-ranging mass transit proposal to create a wedge issue for the 2018 governor's race.

Maryland Transit Opportunities Coalition

State and local elected officials from the Baltimore and Washington metro areas are calling for a transit network that would connect their respective regions. The policy makers joined activists at a press conference Tuesday morning in front of Baltimore’s Penn Station, gearing up for a political fight that could last through the spring's General Assembly session.

The transit system the group envisions would build off MARC and the D.C. Metrorail. It would extend from Martinsburg, West Virginia to the west, to Waldorf, Maryland, to the south, all the way up Elkton, on Maryland’s Delaware line.

Mayor: We Were Optimistic About Red Line Investment

Jan 4, 2016

Baltimore Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake said Wednesday that she supports the claim of a coalition of civil rights groups that Governor Larry Hogan’s decision to cancel the Red Line transit project discriminates against African Americans.

Elected leaders from Baltimore city and county left a meeting with state transportation officials Monday disappointed because no one offered an alternative to the Red Line project shelved by Gov. Larry Hogan. But state Transportation Secretary Pete Rahn said they shouldn’t have been surprised. He sent them an agenda last week.