Talking With The Candidates | WYPR

Talking With The Candidates

Credit John Gotty

Ahead of Maryland's April 26 primary election and continuing through the summer and fall campaigns for the November 8th General Election, former Maryland Morning and now Midday host Tom Hall has been talking with candidates for a variety of local, state and national public offices -- including Baltimore's Mayor, City Council, and Maryland's US House and Senate seats.  Tom Hall has questioned the candidates about their experience, their vision and their plans to lead the city, the state or the nation into a challenging future.  

If you have suggestions or questions, drop us a note via email or send us a tweet to @middaytomhall or give us a call at 410-881-3162.

Photos from Ruppersberger, McDonough campaigns

Today, it’s another Midday on Politics.  With less than two weeks until Election Day, our Talking with the Candidates series continues with a focus on the 2nd Congressional District, which includes communities in Baltimore City as well as Anne Arundel, Baltimore, Harford and Howard Counties. 

Democrat Dutch Ruppersberger has represented the 2nd district in the U.S. Congress for the past 14 years.  He’s been an advocate for improved health care for veterans and has made national security and rebuilding the middle class priority issues.

He’s being challenged by 4-term Republican Delegate Pat McDonough, who has represented the 7th District (Baltimore and Harford counties) in the Maryland House of Delegates since 2003.  He’s also been an advocate for veterans, an outspoken critic of immigration policy, and a strong supporter of Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump. 

Dutch Ruppersberger and Pat McDonough take Tom's questions, and your calls and comments.

Election Day is less than two weeks away. Early voting starts tomorrow. Today, a conversation with the leading candidates for Maryland's 3rd Congressional District.  

Incumbent Democrat John Sarbanes first won the seat in 2006; he’s been re-elected to the House four times since then. He is 54 years old and was born and raised in Baltimore. Rep. Sarbanes is a graduate of Harvard Law School who worked as a lawyer for 17 years before running for Congress. He’s the father of three children. He and his wife Dina live in Towson. His father is retired US Senator Paul Sarbanes.  

In just two weeks Baltimore City voters will head to the polls to elect a new mayor. Voters will have a choice between Democratic nominee State Senator Catherine Pugh, Republican nominee Alan Walden, Green Party nominee Joshua Harris and several write-in candidates including former Mayor Sheila Dixon. After accepting our invitation to join today's conversation seven weeks ago, Senator Catherine Pugh canceled last Friday. Her representatives declined to give us a specific reason for the change of heart. 

Luke Broadwater /The Baltimore Sun

When he ran for Governor, Republican Larry Hogan got 22% of the vote in Baltimore City. But he won 53% of the vote in the First District, which includes Harbor East, Little Italy, Canton, Fells Point, Greektown, Bayview and other historic Southeast Baltimore neighborhoods – all the way East to the county line.

Today, a look at the race for the Baltimore City Council in the First District.

Tom's guests are two youthful and dynamic candidates who prevailed in crowded primaries last spring: Democrat Zeke Cohen and Republican Matt McDaniel. If McDaniel does what Hogan did and wins the district, he would become the first Republican to hold a seat on the city council since 1942, and the first Republican to hold any elective office in Baltimore in 50 years.

The Baltimore City Council is about to undergo big changes. With retirements, some incumbent losses, and some members having run for mayor instead of their council seats, regardless of who wins the election on November 8th, eight of 14 seats on the council will be occupied by people who are new to the job.

In the First District, Mr. McDaniel is mounting a serious campaign against his Democratic rival, Mr. Cohen. Both candidates are charismatic, personable – and new to politics. Matt McDaniel and Zeke Cohen join Tom in Studio A for a conversation about the future of the First. 

KathyforMaryland.com

Tom is joined in the studio for the full hour by Delegate Kathy Szeliga.  She is the Republican nominee for the U.S. Senate seat being vacated by Sen. Barbara Mikulski, who has served in Congress longer than any woman in history.  Del. Szeliga will go head-to-head with her chief rival for that senate seat in November: Representative Chris Van Hollen, a Democrat, who has served Maryland’s 8th Congressional District since 2003. (To listen to Tom's pre-primary interview with Rep. Van Hollen on the March 2, 2016 Maryland Morning program​, click here.)   Del. Szeliga has represented Baltimore and Harford Counties in the Maryland House of Delegates' District 7 for five years, and is the minority whip.  Should she be Maryland’s next U.S. senator? A conversation with Del. Kathy Szeliga. 

This program is part of Tom Hall's Talking with the Candidates series that began early this year on Maryland Morning and continues now on Midday -- an ongoing effort to help inform you about the Maryland candidates running for local, state and national elective offices.  

Photo by Harris for Baltimore

In another installment of our Talking With the Candidates series, Joshua Harris, the Green Party’s nominee for mayor of Baltimore, joins Tom in the Maryland Morning studio.

Mr. Harris is 30 years old and lives in the Hollins Market area of Southwest Baltimore.  He is a community activist and co-founder of Hollins Creative Placemaking.  He is also managing editor of The Sphinx, the magazine of Alpha Phi Alpha, the African-American national fraternity based in Baltimore -- and a former legislative aide for Delegate Charles Sydnor, who represents parts of Baltimore County (Dist 44B).

A Chicago native and a graduate of Augsburg College in Minneapolis,  Mr. Harris moved to Baltimore in 2012.

Harris is running for mayor, he says, because, in the wake of the uprising and riots of 2015, Baltimore needs transformational change, not just -- as he puts it -- tinkering with the status quo.

This week, the relative political newcomer was named “Best Politician” in the City Paper’s annual ‘Best of Baltimore’ issue. 

Walden For Mayor

Republican candidate for Mayor of Baltimore City Alan Walden joins Tom in the studio. 

On Election Day  Tuesday, November 8th, Walden will face Democratic nominee Sen. Catherine Pugh and Green Party candidate Joshua Harris on the ballot.  Alan Walden was a morning anchor and commentator at WBAL radio for 16 years. For years before that, he was chief radio correspondent for NBC News worldwide.  He is 80 years old. He lives in Baltimore’s Cross Keys with his wife, Jeannie. They are the parents of two grown children.  Born in Brooklyn, New York, he says he is a “Baltimorean by choice,” having lived in the city since 1988. 

sarbanes.house.gov

    

Wednesday means politics on Maryland Morning, and we begin today with Rep. John Sarbanes, live in Studio A.  Congressman Sarbanes, who lives with his family in Towson, is a Democrat who has represented Maryland’s 3rd Congressional District in the U.S. House of Representatives since 2007. He sailed through last month’s primary election, winning 87% of the Democratic vote. His far-flung district includes parts of Baltimore County and Baltimore City but also narrow slices of Howard, Montgomery and Anne Arundel counties, including Annapolis. It’s been called one of the most gerrymandered congressional districts in the country, and it heavily favors Democrats.

The 53-year-old incumbent will face businessman, lawyer and physician Mark Plaster, who won the Republican primary last week. The 3rd District includes a very diverse set of constituents within its serpentine boundaries. Congressman Sarbanes has a wide pallet of policy interests. He is a national voice on campaign finance reform. His recent initiatives have addressed everything from the opioid abuse crisis to climate change, solar energy, and environmental education.

embryforbaltimore.org, pughformayor.com, carlstokes2016.com

Tomorrow, as early voting begins in Maryland, state residents will begin casting their ballots for the national and local primaries. There are 13 candidates running for the Democratic nomination for Mayor of Baltimore. 

According to the most recent poll, released by The Baltimore Sun and the University of Baltimore, State Senator Catherine Pugh leads with 31 percent of likely voter support, followed by former mayor Shelia Dixon with 25 percent. Lawyer Elizabeth Embry is in third place with 9 percent support, up from 5 percent last month. Businessman David Warnock is in fourth place with 7 percent, and Councilman Carl Stokes and Councilman Nick Mosby are tied at fifth place in the poll, with 5 percent support.

Last week, Maryland Morning hosted a debate between Shelia Dixon, David Warnock and Nick Mosby. At the time, according to a March 10th poll, Warnock was in third place and Mosby was in fourth. Senator Pugh had been invited to  join that debate but she declined, citing obligations in the Senate. 

On Wednesday morning, after initially declining WYPR's invitation to participate in a second mayoral debate with candidates Elizabeth Embry and Carl Stokes, Senator Pugh arrived unexpectedly at the Maryland Morning studio a few minutes after the live program had begun.  She was invited to join the debate in progress, and spent the rest of the hour with candidates Embry and Stokes discussing the issues in the mayoral race with host Tom Hall. 

Sheila Dixon for Mayor, David Warnock, John Brecher

*On April 13th Nick  Mosby announced that he is suspending his campaign for mayor. Mosby has endorsed State Sen. Catherine Pugh. 

Beginning April 14th, Baltimore City residents will have the opportunity to cast their votes in the crowded 13-person race for the Democratic nomination for Mayor of Baltimore. 

There have been dozens of mayoral forums held throughout the city, many of which offered a platform to most, if not all, of the candidates. While it’s important to consider the views of everyone running, the sheer volume of people on stage has made it difficult for any candidate to explain their vision in a thoughtful and unhurried way.

Maryland Morning invited the top three Democratic candidates in the most recent poll to participate in a live in-studio debate. The poll, published in March, was commissioned by the Baltimore Sun and the University of Baltimore's College of Public Affairs and Schaefer Center for Public Policy and was conducted by Opinion Works.

According to the poll, State Senator Catherine Pugh leads with 26 percent of likely voter support, followed by former Mayor Sheila Dixon with 24 percent. Businessman David Warnock comes in third with 10 percent support. The top three are followed in the polls by Nick Mosby( 6 percent), Elizabeth Embry (5 percent) and Carl Stokes (3 percent).

Seven other candidates registered below 1% in the Sun/UB survey.

After originally agreeing to come, Senator Pugh canceled, citing obligations in the Senate. Sheila Dixon, David Warnock and Nick Mosby join Tom in-studio for an hour-long debate on the issues that seem to matter most to voters: crime, education, economic development and racial inequality.

The Baltimore City Sitting Judges Campaign

Next month, Baltimore City voters will be asked to elect judges to the 8th Circuit Court. Of the eight candidates, six are sitting judges running in what’s known as a retention election. 

The sitting judges -- Shannon Avery, Michael DiPietro, Karen “Chaya” Friedman, Cynthia Jones, Audrey Carrión and Wanda Keyes Heard – were appointed by former Governors after being recommended by a non-partisan commission. The judges are campaigning as a block, although they will not be identified as “sitting judges” on the ballot. Last week, the two candidates not appointed by a governor, Todd Oppenheim and James Kraft, were on the program. Sitting Judges Shannon Avery and Cynthia Jones join Tom to discuss how they were appointed and why they deserve to keep their seats.  

On April 26, Baltimore city residents will vote to elect judges to the 8th Circuit Court. Of the eight candidates on the ballot, six are sitting judges -- appointed by a governor -- running in what is known as a retention election. The two remaining candidates, James Kraft and Todd Oppenheim were not appointed by a judge and are running independently.

Oppenheim has been a public defender in Baltimore for 11 years.  Kraft is a sitting city councilman in Baltimore’s 1st district; he’s been on the council since 2004. Both men join Tom in-studio to discuss why they’re running to be judges, despite not receiving a gubernatorial appointment.  

electcalvinyoung.com

Now, another in our series of interviews with people who have announced their intention to run for Mayor of Baltimore, in which Maryland Morning host Tom Hall asks each candidate about their vision for the city.  

Tom's guest is Calvin Young, a 28-year-old engineer who lives in Hamilton, Maryland. He is a Harvard Business School graduate who has never held elective office.   He was the second candidate, after former Mayor Sheila Dixon, to file to run as a Democrat for mayor of Baltimore, officially launching his campaign in mid-August, 2015, before current Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake announced she would not seek re-election.  Young is a Baltimore native who graduated from Poly and New York University, and is a former city youth commissioner.  He has also served as an aide in the White House National Economic Council, helping to develop economic and business development policy recommendations for the President. He spoke with Tom in studio on March 10, 2016. 

GLAAD

Today, we continue our series of conversations with candidates for Mayor of Baltimore.  DeRay McKesson is a native Baltimorean, and he’s worked as an administrator in the Baltimore City Public Schools.  He’s 30 years old, and for the past year or so he has been a full time activist, working in Ferguson, Baltimore and elsewhere on issues that include police misconduct and mass incarceration.  He has never held public office.  He’s on the ballot in the Democratic primary on April 26th , the last  candidate to file to run for the Baltimore mayor's office. Within days of his filing, Mckesson  released a comprehensive plan to address the city's most pressing issues, including proposals to expand educational programs and to begin major reforms of the Baltimore police department.  DeRay Mckesson joins Tom to share his vision for the City.

CindyWalshForMayor

Maryland Morning has been hosting a series of conversations with people who have announced their intention to run for Mayor of Baltimore.  All told, there will be 13 Democratic candidates on the April 26 primary ballot,  along with five Republicans.  Three Green Party Candidates will compete in their own Green Party primary on May 1. One Libertarian, 2 Independents, and 5 candidates who are not affiliated with any party will appear on the General Election ballot on Tuesday, November, 8.

Today, another in our series of weekly conversations with candidates who are on the ballot in the April 26 primary. We continue our focus this week on the race for the United States Senate. Congressman Chris Van Hollen has represented Maryland’s 8th congressional district since 2003. He is running in the Democratic primary to be the party's standard bearer in the November election to replace Sen. Barbara Mikulski, who is retiring early next year. Tom talks with Rep. Van Hollen about the issues that will face a new Senate and a new President in 2017, and about his vision for Maryland and the country.

cupidformayor.com

 Today, we continue our series of conversations with people who have announced their intention to run for Mayor of Baltimore.  There will be 13 Democratic candidates on the April 26th primary ballot.  Five candidates have also registered to be on the Republican primary ballot.  Three Green Party Candidates will compete in their own May 1st primary balloting.  One Libertarian, 2 Independents, and 5 candidates who are not affiliated with any party will appear on the General Election ballot in November. 

Tom's guest is Gersham Cupid.  The Edgecomb neighborhood resident is a 10-year veteran of the Baltimore City Police Department, where he holds the rank of sergeant. He is a Democrat. He is 28 years old and married, with a child on the way. Cupid has never before held elective office, but as he explains to Tom, Baltimore is sorely in  need of new and more effective leadership, and his years of public service as a police officer have prepared him for the mayor's job. His top-priority issue for the city is public safety.

abetterbaltimore.org

Maryland Morning host Tom Hall has been conducting a series of conversations with people who have announced their intention to run for mayor of Baltimore.  There will be 13 Democratic candidates on the April 26th primary ballot.  Five candidates have also registered to be on the Republican primary ballot.  Three Green Party candidates will be competing in a separate Green Party primary on May 1st. One Libertarian, 2 Independents, and 5 candidates who are Unaffiliated (with any party) will appear on the General Election ballot on November 8th. 

Continuing his conversations with mayoral candidates about their visions for Baltimore, Tom speaks with Democrat Patrick Gutierrez, a former Bank of America operations manager who has also worked with the non-profit Downtown Baltimore Family Alliance.   Married and the father of two young children, the 43-year-old Taylor Heights resident believes the most important issue facing Baltimore today is its lack of strong leadership, and the inefficiency and lack of accountability he says are rife in city agencies.

donnaedwards.house.gov

We've been spending the past several Wednesdays here on Maryland Morning talking to the Democratic candidates for mayor of Baltimore.  Today, we shift our focus to another important race that will be decided in the April 26th primary election.  The race for the United States Senate seat being vacated by Sen. Barbara Mikulski is almost as crowded with candidates as the race for mayor of Baltimore:  10 Democrats and 14 Republicans have thrown their hats in the ring.   We've invited the two leading Democratic candidates in the race to join us on Maryland Morning, this week and next.

Today, Tom's guest is Congresswoman Donna Edwards. She has represented Maryland's 4th Congressional District since 2008.  The Fort Washington resident currently serves on the House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee, as well as the Science, Space and Technology Committee. 

Next week, Tom's guest will be Rep. Edwards' chief rival for the US Senate seat, Representative Chris Van Hollen, a Democrat who represents Maryland's 8th Congressional District.

carlstokes2016.com

Today, we continue our series of  Wednesday conversations with people who have announced their intention to run for Mayor of Baltimore, in which Maryland Morning host Tom Hall asks the candidates about their vision for the city.  

There will be 13 Democratic candidates on the April 26th primary ballot.  Five candidates have registered to be on the Republican primary ballot.  Three Green Party candidates, 1 Libertarian, 2 Independents, and 5 candidates not affiliated with any party will appear on the General Election ballot in November. 

Tom's guest this week is Baltimore City Councilman Carl Stokes.  He is a Democrat.  He is 65 years old.  He lives in Greater Greenmount, and he’s the father of two daughters.  As a young man, Stokes first managed and then owned a chain of men's clothing stores, before turning to politics and winning election to the City Council in 1987.  He served for eight years, and when he left the Council in 1995, he was appointed to serve on the Baltimore City School Board.  He later worked as the vice president of a medical equipment and supplies company and was Chief Operating Officer of The Bluford Drew Jemison STEM Academy, a public-charter middle school for boys which he co-founded in 2006 in East Baltimore.  In 2010, when Stephanie Rawlings Blake became mayor following Sheila Dixon’s resignation, Jack Young’s councilman seat in District 12 opened up after Mr. Young was appointed city council president.  Carl Stokes was appointed to fill Mr. Young’s seat ; in 2011, he was elected to that seat on the council, where he currently serves District 12 as chair of the Taxation, Finance and Economic Development Committee.  He is giving up the seat to run for mayor, an office he first ran for in 1999 and again in 2011.

pughformayor.com

  Today, we continue our series of conversations with people who have announced their intention to run for Mayor of Baltimore.  The deadline for filing with the board of elections was last Wednesday.  When the dust settled, we found that there will be 13 Democratic candidates on the April 26 primary ballot, one of whom, activist DeRay McKesson, filed about an hour before the deadline.  Five Republicans have also registered to be on the ballot.  Three Green Party candidates, 1 Libertarian, 2 Independents, and 5 candidates not affiliated with any party will appear on the General Election ballot on Election Day, Tuesday, November 8. 

We’ve spent the past four Wednesdays here on Maryland Morning speaking with candidates about their visions for the city.  Today, Tom's guest is State Senator Catherine Pugh.  She is a Democrat.  She is 65 years old.  She lives in Ashburton.  She has served on the Baltimore City Council and in the Maryland House of Delegates.  Since 2007, she has represented the city of Baltimore as Senator from the 40th District.  She has been the Majority Leader of the Maryland Senate since last year, after serving as the Deputy Majority Leader for three years, and the Deputy Majority Whip for three years prior to that.  

@davidwarnock

Today we continue our series of conversations with people who have announced their intention to run for Mayor of Baltimore. As of February 3rd, 12 Democrats, 4 Republicans, 1 Green Party candidate, 2 Independents, and 4 Unaffiliated candidates have registered with the Board of Elections to be on the April 26th mayoral primary ballot.  Their deadline to file is today. Each Wednesday for the next several weeks, we’ll take some time here on Maryland Morning to speak with candidates about their visions for the city.

David Warnock joins Tom in the studio this morning to make the case for what sets him apart in this year’s crowded race for Charm City’s top job. He’s 58 years old, a Democrat, and a successful businessman. He is the founder of a private equity firm and co-founder of the Green Street Academy, a charter school in West Baltimore. Warnock is also the chairman of a charitable foundation that has funded a variety of educational and community-focused organizations, including The Center for Urban Families

Nick Mosby Campaign Website

*On April 13th Nick  Mosby announced that he is suspending his campaign for mayor. Mosby has endorsed State Sen. Catherine Pugh. 

We continue our weekly series of conversations with people who have announced their candidacy for the office of Mayor of Baltimore. Today, Tom's guest is Nick Mosby. He is a Democrat. He is several weeks away from his 36th birthday. He lives in Reservoir Hill with his wife, State’s Attorney Marilyn Mosby, and their two young daughters.

After graduating from Tuskeegee University with a degree in electrical engineering, Nick Mosby worked in the utility industry, first as a network engineer with Verizon, and later as a senior project manager for BGE. In 2011, he was elected to represent West Baltimore's 7th district on the City Council.  Among his notable initiatives as a councilman was passage of the “Ban the Box” legislation, which allows ex-felons in Baltimore City to disclose their conviction later in the hiring process when they apply for jobs.  He has released a 15-point plan for the future of Baltimore, on issues ranging from education and good governance to blight and economic equity. You can read more here. 

Tonight at 5:30, there will be a forum of mayoral candidates at the Impact Hub at the Center Theater in Station North. If you can’t make it in person, it will be live-streamed. Next week, Tom's guest will be Democratic mayoral candidate and Baltimore businessman David Warnock.

Sheila Dixon Campaign Website

Today we continue our series of conversations with people who have announced their intention to run for Mayor of Baltimore. As of January 20th, 8 Democrats, 2 Republicans, 1 Green Party candidate, 2 Independents, and 5 Unaffiliated candidates have registered with the Board of Elections to be on the April 26th mayoral primary ballot. At least 4 candidates have opened campaign headquarters and have been actively campaigning, but have yet to file with the Board of Elections. Their deadline to do so is two weeks from today, on February 3rd. Each Wednesday for the next several weeks, we’ll take some time here on Maryland Morning to speak with candidates about their visions for the city.

Tom's guest today is Sheila Dixon. She is a Democrat. She is 62 years old, and lives in Hunting Ridge on the city's west side. Ms. Dixon is currently working with the Maryland Minority Contractors Association. She was first elected to the City Council in 1987. She served as the Mayor of Baltimore from 2007-2010, until she resigned following a misdemeanor conviction for fraudulent misappropriation of gift cards given to her by some real estate developers.

Embry4Baltimore

Today, we begin a series of conversations with people who have announced their intention to run for Mayor of Baltimore.  As of Monday (January 11th), 9 Democrats, 1 Republican, 1 Green Party Candidate, 1 Independent, and 3 Unaffiliated candidates have registered with the Board of Elections to be on the April 26 ballot.  Several candidates who have opened campaign headquarters and who have been actively campaigning have yet to file with the Board of Elections.  Their deadline to do so is three weeks from today, February 3rd. 

Each Wednesday for the next several weeks, we’ll take some time here on Maryland Morning to speak with candidates about their vision for the city.  Today, Tom's guest is Elizabeth Embry.  She is a lawyer.  She is 38 years old.  She lives in Waverly, and she has worked most recently as the chief of the criminal division in the Maryland Attorney General’s office.   She is a Democrat.  She announced her candidacy on November 6th.

To cast your ballot in the April 26th Maryland State & Baltimore mayoral primary elections, you must have registered to vote by April 5th.  For more information on the primary election and how to register,  click here