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WYPR Features

Haussner's

May 26, 2017

On the afternoon of December 18, 1999, watched anxiously in auctioneering house in Timonium, as the auctioneer rattled off the artifacts for sale from the once and famous and now defunct Haussner's restaurant - weeks earlier a reigning queen at Eastern Avenue and Conkling streets. In the end the memories of thousands of lunches and dinners and of millions of dollars of artwork and 73 years of Baltimore times winds up in a ball of twine - on display in an antique shop on Fells Point.

​This episode originally aired March 2016.

Meg Eden

May 26, 2017

Tom talks with the poet and novelist Meg Eden. 

Meg Eden is recommending:

Karma Khullar’s Mustache by Kristi Wientge

The Screwtape Letters by C.S. Lewis

Meg’s new novel (coming in June, 2017) is called Post High School Reality Quest. Learn more here

Lagging Cities

May 26, 2017
Erich Ferdinand/flickr

It’s a big country, which among other things means that something that generally characterizes the nation may not be pertinent to the conditions prevailing in dozens of communities. Here’s an example. We are now in the midst of the third longest economic expansion in U.S. history. The nation’s unemployment rate is at roughly a decade low, but as indicated by writer Jeffery Sparshott, nearly a third of America’s cities and suburbs have failed to regain all of the jobs they lost during the most recent recession.

The Way We Worked in Carroll County

May 25, 2017

Did you know that wormseed oil production is one of the oldest industries in Maryland?  We’re bringing a Smithsonian traveling exhibition, The Way We Worked, to five communities in Maryland this year and companion exhibitions will uncover the unique history of work in our state. Joanne Weant, manager of Carroll County Farm Museum in Westminster, tells us about the focus of the companion exhibit on this third stop of the tour.

Tom Pelton

It was just after dawn when I set out paddling in my kayak to find nature in one of the least natural places on Earth.

I had launched into the Patapsco River from Fort Armistead Park near the base of the Francis Scott Key Bridge south of Baltimore. Truck traffic roared overhead on Route 695.   Ahead of me, the morning sun sparkled silver in a rippling path toward the old Sparrows Point steel mill.  Behind my back rose the smokestacks of a pair of coal-fired power plants, a chemical factory, sewage plant, and the mounded back of the city’s Quarantine Road landfill.

But the sky was blue, the breeze was balmy, and out on the water I felt away from it all.

 

Christy Wyskiel

May 25, 2017

Christy Wyskiel, adviser to the president of Johns Hopkins University tells us why Baltimore is a hub for bio and tech innovation. 

The Labor Market

May 25, 2017
Glenn Carstens-Peters/Unsplash

If one wanted to make the argument that the U.S. labor market is in good shape, one could easily quote a few statistics to make the case. One might be tempted to start with the fact that the official unemployment rate stands at 4.4 percent. As pointed out by writer Greg Ip, unemployment has been this low only twice since 1990.

Glenn Carstens-Peters/Unsplash

Whether you are a retiree or simply related to one, one of the fears is that some bad actor will insinuate themselves into your lives and take unscrupulous financial advantage.  A number of states have laws on the books specific to the crime of theft from a vulnerable adult.  According to the National Conference on State Legislatures, which monitors these laws, this type of financial abuse remains an active topic in state capitals.  

"Color Guard"

May 24, 2017

In 1864, black men from Baltimore and surrounding areas, both free and enslaved, volunteered to fight for the Union Army as soldiers of the 4th U.S. Colored Infantry. 

Global Economies

May 24, 2017
Ricardo/flickr

There has been a considerable volume of discussion recently regarding improvements in global economic performance. Last year, the worldwide economy expanded just three point one percent. The International Monetary Fund predicts that this year will be better, and that global output will expand 3.5 percent.  

Anirban has more on this story. 


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