WYPR Features | WYPR

WYPR Features

Dr. Jeffrey Kahn

36 minutes ago

Tom talks with Dr. Jeffrey Kahn, the Director of the Johns Hopkins Berman Institute of Bioethics.

Jeff is recommending:

Building Art: The Life and Work of Frank Gehry by Paul Goldberger

Black Chalk by Christopher Yates

Preserving the Past (Encore)

1 hour ago
MARMIA

Siobhan Hagan, president and CEO of the Mid-Atlantic Regional Moving Image Archive tells us about the value of audio-visual preservation.

Jan Mark Holzer/flickr

Audio for this segment will be posted by the end of the day on Thursday. 

It's all about keeping an open mind when you look for value. Click the links to purchase Al and Hugh's recommendations at Kenilworth Wine & Spirits.

jeffreyw/flickr

Audio for this segment will be posted by the end of the day on Thursday. 

I don't know, but I've seen it in the movies: Italians will eat pasta all year long. Whether it's in the bleak mid-winter or al fresco on a sunny summer afternoon, pasta is always there.  And as Chef Jerry Pellegrino of Schola Cooking School will tell you, there seems to be quite a few pasta ideas that are appropriate for these warmer months.

Here's a few.

Eli Hanover (Encore)

2 hours ago

Baltimore, 1940: In the gym of the Jewel Box Girly Club on 'The Block,' a 'trainer' worked at his dream: teaching contenders how to box and making Baltimore a world-renowned center for boxing. 

The National Aquarium

Summer is here, and over 60 million Americans are beach bound. Take a listen to learn some simple, helpful suggestions for leaving the beach better than you found it. 

The New York Times

One of the most significant benefits to my position as Executive Director of Irvine Nature Center is access to the 210 acres of wild land we have here—and the incredible species that call it home. Our meadow, a wide open space filled with tall grasses and wildflowers, is a prime location to see large birds of prey on the hunt. Last week, I went out to the meadow for a walk after lunch. There were a number of hawks circling the space, waiting to swoop down and grab their prey. When one decided to strike, I saw it dive quickly and come back up from the grasses with something small, furry, and brown. I initially thought it was a mole, but moles spend so much of their time in their underground burrows, it would be surprising that one would be caught so easily above ground. Plus, this would have been a very small mole. It was then I remembered the meadow vole, a small rodent that is native to our area and quite prevalent. I’m sure that’s what this hawk grabbed for his late afternoon lunch.

Maryland Department of Natural Resources

I was paddling down the Big Gunpowder Falls near Sparks, Maryland, when I saw a great blue heron standing on a log in the river, tall and elegant.   As I drifted closer, it launched into the air and flew over my head, its six-foot wingspan and knife-like beak all the more impressive at close range.

Nearby, atop the riverbank, was a house.  I thought:  what is the economic value of this heron to that homeowner? 

Would he be able to sell his house for $505,000 instead of $500,000 if a buyer saw the heron before agreeing to the price? Or maybe the location and the view of the river are all that matter in the fast-moving world of real estate transactions.

thebittenword.com

The Transamerica Center for Health Studies has released a new "Healthier Traditions" cookbook. This year they've brought you healthy twists on classic soul food recipes. Hector tells us more. 

Wage growth, student debt, employment in steel cities, levels of wealth based on age and looking at where people are moving for work.

thurmontimages.com

On June 17, 1905, a freight train collided with a passenger train near Ransom, a little village southeast of Patapsco, Maryland.

While consumer and business needs change, regions with such storied histories as the Greater Baltimore region often benefit from established, multigenerational companies. Greater Baltimore is seeing growth in many industries but one of the most significant has been the construction industry due to the growth in commercial and residential development.

Joining us today for Why Baltimore is Jamie Alban, CEO of Alban Cat, a construction equipment company headquartered in Baltimore for four generations since 1927.

The Father of Modern Battlefield Medicine

Jun 14, 2018

Did you know that the very first use of an ambulance corps and medical triage in the United States occurred in Frederick, Maryland? Major Jonathan Letterman — called "The Father of Modern Battlefield Medicine" — instituted these essential medical practices during the Civil War’s Battle of Antietam. Jake Wynn of the National Museum of Civil War Medicine talks about battle’s impact on Frederick and Letterman’s influence on medicine.

NZ not SB

Jun 13, 2018
Ralf Smallkaa/flickr

Al and Hugh offer some wine picks that show that New Zealand can do more than just sauvignon blancs. Click the links to purchase Al and Hugh's recommendations at Kenilworth Wine & Spirits.

Simon Says

Jun 13, 2018

Simon Says playing games with your young children is one way for them to learn impulse control.  

Maryland Department of Natural Resources

In a laboratory at the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center in Edgewater, Maryland, zoologist Rob Aguilar examines bottles containing preserved specimens of an astonishing array of different varieties of aquatic life.

“We have speckled swimming crabs, long finned squid, jackknife clam, ponderous arc,” said Aguilar, scrutinizing a thick mussel with a serrated shell. “This is a fish-gill isopod. And this is a big marine leach that prefers to be on skates and rays.”

Aguilar is engaged in a project to study the genetic codes of numerous species in the Chesapeake Bay. He and colleagues record them in public databases called GenBank and the Barcode of Life Database, so that researchers around the world can use the information to identify fish and other critters.

Hoi: Building for Success

Jun 13, 2018
MICA

MICA President Samuel Hoi encourages us to become "bridge builders for our city's youth, so that every Baltimore child has the best chance to succeed and to become the builders of their and our future."

Panna Cotta

Jun 13, 2018
Bex Walton/flickr

I was watching one of those cooking shows the other day, and a contestant decided to whip up a batch of panna cotta, the wonderfully light and fruity Italian dessert. I asked Chef Jerry Pellegrino of Schola Cooking School, since it's such an easy dish, why don't more people try it? And I think it's because the key ingredient is gelatin, something modern home cooks don't work with very often. Here's an easy recipe.

BBC

I was having a conversation recently about these larger predators like coyotes, wolves, and mountain lions, whose territories are constantly changing in response to human decisions. With fewer and fewer wild, open spaces for these animals to hunt, it’s becoming increasingly common for us to see these species where we wouldn’t expect to – in our parks, our yards, and our highways. The plight of the mountain lion is especially interesting, as human interference has significantly impacted this species for centuries.

Salt Marshes

Jun 13, 2018

It’s consistently astonishing to me how much of an impact we humans have on our native species. Our decisions to develop and farm lands, level forests, and hunt can have a wide-reaching impact on plants and animals alike. This is especially true for the top predators, who rely on a finely-tuned natural web of other species to survive.

New Memoirs

Jun 12, 2018

On this edition of The Weekly Reader, Marion Winik shares two new memoirs about women leading unconventional lives and relishing the things that make them different.

Changes in population, marriage age, home prices, age of homebuyers, and personal wealth. 

A recent Harvard Business Review article indicates that over the past four decades, changes prompted by corporate America have placed workers and the broader American society at risk. Here’s what authors Teresa Ghilarducci and Tony James mean. The shift from defined benefit pension plans to employee-directed contribution 401K plans represents a major driver of America’s impending retirement crisis.  Beginning during the 1980s, this shift in retirement benefits helped companies reduce their retirement liabilities and better meet their quarterly financial targets.  

Trauma Hurts

Jun 8, 2018

Researchers at Penn State recently conducted a study that found connections between early childhood adversity and chronic pain in adulthood. Using data culled from over 260 participants who had reported some level of childhood trauma, researchers found that childhood adversity was linked to not only to pain but mood and sleep problems, in adulthood.

"Omaha Beach"

Jun 7, 2018

On June 6th, 1944, soldiers from Maryland, Virginia, and Pennsylvania, members of the 29th Division, were among the first soldiers to land at Omaha Beach on the coast of Normandy.

The Walters Art Museum

According to the Maryland State Arts Council, our state's arts organizations have an economic impact of more than $1 billion.  In Greater Baltimore, there are more than 9,500 full time equivalent jobs in the arts, double the median number found in similar-sized regions. Joining us today for Why Baltimore is Julia-Marciari Alexander, Executive Director of the Walters Art Museum.

30 years ago, the Baltimore City Council passed The Gay Rights Bill of 1988, which provided legal protection against discrimination for gay and lesbian citizens. Dr. Jonathan Bailey talks about GLBTQAI social spaces, anti-racist civil rights movements, and their impact on the bill’s passing. Bailey is the author of a forthcoming book about race, gender, and sexuality in post-civil rights Baltimore, which covers 1965 through 1995.

After a spring of wretched downpours and cold, cloudy weather, summer has finally begun -- at least unofficially -- and the bullfrogs are singing its praise.

I slide my kayak into the lake at Tuckahoe State Park on Maryland’s Eastern Shore.  It’s a sunny, breezy afternoon, and the lake is fringed by swaying reeds and the arrow-shaped leaves of water plants -- called Tuckahoe – whose roots were an important source of food for Native Americans.

As I paddle along the edge of the lake, three painted turtles sunning themselves on a log plunk down into the water. Dragonflies flit over the surface. A leaf drifts down into the lake, and as it lands, its curled backside stretches up from the water like the sail of a boat.

My trip is a prelude to the joys of summer.  And what brought me here was a new book called Paddle Maryland by University of Maryland, Baltimore County biologist Bryan McKay.

A Cleaner Earth: Rachel Carson

Jun 6, 2018
Maryland Women’s Hall of Fame

Rachel Carson changed our world for the better, quite literally, with her 1962 book “Silent Spring.” In it, she brought attention to the contamination of our environment through the use of pesticides.

A pair of California labels over-deliver on classic wines. Click the links to purchase Al and Hugh's recommendations at Kenilworth Wine & Spirits.

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