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WYPR Features

Crossing Barriers, Building Relationships

Feb 24, 2017
Bge.com

Sarah Hemminger on the need to form relationships between Baltimoreans and how "TouchPoint Baltimore" seeks to break down barriers.

Ian Belknap

Feb 23, 2017
Ian Belknap Twitter

What do Malcom X and Julius Caesar have in common? Ian Belknap, Artistic Director for The Acting Company explains. 

Russell Snyder

Feb 23, 2017

Today's guest is Russell Snyder, President & CEO of Volunteers of America Chesapeake. He tells us about the accomplishments and the future plans for the VAC's Baltimore Re-entry Center.

Karen/flickr

When many of us were growing up, it was quite customary for someone to be on strike. Over time, the strike or work stoppage has become a rarely used instrument for labor unions to extract better treatment from employers or higher levels of compensation. According to data recently made available by the U.S. Labor Department, fewer major work stoppages occurred over the past ten years than occurred each year from 1947 to 1981.

Elyce Feliz/flickr

Data seemingly indicate that many people are resigned to the notion that their retirement income will largely come from Social Security. For instance, a recent study by the non-partisan US Government Accountability Office or GAO indicates that as many as half of all households with Americans 55 years old or older have no retirement savings at all.

Maryland Winter Wine Event

Feb 22, 2017
Jon Connell/flickr

Al visited the annual Maryland Winter Wine Gala and had a chance to taste the very best wines from the Free State.  He was impressed by the quality and provided this list of highlights.

EPA Chesapeake Bay Program

The Chesapeake Bay defines Maryland geographically, historically and culturally.  And for millennia, what defined the Chesapeake Bay were oysters. The shellfish were not only an important food for people -- but, more importantly, they were the ecological cornerstone of the living bay, filtering and cleaning the bay’s waters; providing a home for blue crabs, fish and countless other species; and building reefs that were the necessary foundation for the reproduction of more life.

After the Civil War, however, watermen began ripping the lungs out of the bay by using ships to drag heavy metal rakes with bags across the bottom.  By 1891, Maryland’s oyster commissioner, Dr. William K. Brooks, began raising alarms that the bay’s seafood industry was not sustainable.

“Everywhere, in France, in Germany, in England, in Canada, and in all northern coast states [of the United States,] history tells the same story,” Brooks wrote.  “In all waters where oysters are found at all, they are usually found in abundance. And in all of these places the residents supposed that their natural beds were inexhaustible until they suddenly found that they were exhausted.”

What if just one year could change your life? It can. If it happens at an early age.

Jo Sau/flickr

There has certainly been much concern expressed about the declining economic circumstances of American men in recent decades. But American men are hardly alone in facing adversity. The Resolution Foundation, a British think tank, has published new research indicating that British men born between 1981 and 2000 will earn $12,500 pounds less in their twenties than Generation X men.

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