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WYPR Features

Quality Matters

Sep 13, 2017

When looking for child care, quality matters. Here are a few things to look for.

The Daily Oklahoman

With hurricanes and floods recently swamping Florida, Texas, India and Bangladesh, and wildfires raging across California and the U.S. west, climate change is at the forefront of public policy discussions around the world.

An American agency with a central role in studying climate change is NASA, with its satellites providing critical data about temperatures and weather conditions. President Donald Trump has nominated as the next Administrator of NASA Congressman Jim Bridenstine, a Republican from Oklahoma, Navy aviator and booster of the idea of privatizing space exploration. 

Bridenstine is strongly supported by the commercial space flight industry. But his confirmation is being opposed by many scientists, environmentalists and others who object to his denial of the scientific consensus that global warming is real.

Viognier

Sep 13, 2017
Paul Aloe/flickr

Click on the image for the wine list. 

House Afire

Sep 13, 2017

Click on the image for more. 

Poverty to Prosperity

Sep 12, 2017

Rev. Alvin C. Hathaway, pastor of Union Baptist Church joins us this week to talk about moving people past poverty. 

Colin Houston/flickr

The more time I spend in the kitchen the more I become enamored with trying different seasonings.  All that talk about spicing up one's life can be taken literally.  A deft command of the spice rack can give you unbelievable culinary powers.  But as Chef Jerry Pellegrino tells us, there are some handy shortcuts spice lovers can take advantage of.

Click on the image for the recommendations. 

Glenn Carstens-Peters/Unsplash

Click on the image for The MERs for the week of September 4.

jeremy sternberg/flickr

Starting with this week's episode, The Morning Economic Report will be presented in one podcast. 

Click on the image for The MERs for the week of August 28.

apox apox/flickr

Hector tells us what we need to know about different types of plans and options. 

Click on the image for the audio. 

Tony and Chef Cindy interview 3 passionate amateur chefs. They tell us what inspires them, why they love to cook, what their favorite dishes are and what tools of the trade the love to use. 

At the end of a long summer’s day in 2003, a young Shannon Mullaney was driving home along the Jones Falls Expressway, looking forward to dinner. When—Screech! Accident! She got out of her car to meet the driver of the other car. Minutes later they found themselves at the bar next to one another at a tavern off of Exit 10. They got married. And then divorced. She said she lost the guy but still had the story. So do we.

William Egginton

Sep 8, 2017

A common question faced by liberal arts majors and educators alike is how their education will serve them later in life. William Egginton, director of the Alexander Grass Humanities Institute at Johns Hopkins  University, tells us more about the new Institute and how it serves its students through the humanities.

Today's guest is Kimberly Groves, President and CEO of KCW Engineering.

On August 24, 1814, Joshua Barney and his troops fought the British at Bladensburg as they made their way to sack and burn Washington. 

Wage Gains

Sep 7, 2017

For months, economists have puzzled over low wage growth in the context of low unemployment.  The nation’s official rate of unemployment recently hit a 16 year low, but average hourly earnings are only up about two and a half percent over the past year, well short of the three and a half percent that typifies a solidly performing economy. 

Myth Busters

Sep 6, 2017

Here are few parenting myths we've debunked just for you. 

MIKE KEELING/FLICKR CREATIVE COMMONS

 

When children visit Irvine’s exhibit hall, they are often most excited to see our lively snakes. They can meet any of the 4 species of native snakes we have, from the corn snake to the leucistic black rat snake. Immediately, these kids step forward and want to get up close. And they have so many questions: “How big does it get? What does it eat? Where does it live? What animals eat it?”

But when adults visit, they often see a snake and quickly take one big step back. And they only have one question: “Is it poisonous?”

Of Maryland’s 27 species of snakes, only 2 are dangerous. But none are poisonous. Not one. And worldwide, few slithering species are poisonous. That’s because the small, select group of non-constrictor snakes that are dangerous are venomous, not poisonous. And it’s an important difference.

tjabeljan/flickr

Click on the image for the recommendations. 

CNBC

With Texas officials predicting more than $100 billion in cleanup costs from Hurricane Harvey, and Florida now threatened with flooding from Hurricane Irma, Sandra Knight couldn’t help thinking about flooding right here in Maryland.

Knight is a former deputy administrator at the Federal Emergency Management Agency who is now a research engineer at the University of Maryland’s Center for Disaster Resilience. She said that with climate change driving up sea levels, cities like Baltimore and Annapolis in recent years have been experiencing far more frequent floods – and should prepare for even higher storm surges in the near future.

“Some of the statistics from NOAA tell us that, since the 1950s or 1960s, Annapolis and Baltimore have had their rates of sunny day flooding increase over 900 percent,” Knight said. “That tells us we’re very vulnerable.”

 


Art and Death

Sep 6, 2017

Click on the image for the book list.  

Horseshoe Crabs

Sep 5, 2017
The National Aquarium

A complex and delicate connection exists between Atlantic horseshoe crabs and a threatened migratory bird called the Rufa Red Knot in nearby Delaware Bay. Hear how human-induced issues such as coastal development, sea level rise and climate change, have put the ties that bind them in jeopardy.

Personal Creations/flickr www.personalcreations.com

There's an enormous variety of veggies out there in our Maryland markets and grocery stores.  And as students at La Schola cooking school can tell you, one of life's treats is to go shopping with Chef Jerry Pellegrino and fill your basket with whatever captures your fancy at the farmers market.

One thing you can do is whip up a vegetable-heavy summer casserole. 

Click on the image for recipes. 

Blue Laws

Aug 31, 2017
Victor/flickr

On a Sunday afternoon in 1937, a policemen stationed outside of a Max’s Delicatessen on University Parkway stopped a customer and demanded to see the purchases. To the customer’s dismay, the officer found—contraband! A corned beef on rye with mustard. Max was arrested. He had violated Baltimore’s Blue Laws, which  effectively shut the town down on Sunday. The Laws are gone but the stories about them are not!

Modern Family

Aug 31, 2017

What defines a family? That depends on who you ask. 

In late summer, 1897, using "unorthodox methods" and "inside baseball," the scrappy Baltimore Orioles battled the more refined Boston Bean Eaters for the National League pennant. 

Mike Janke

Aug 31, 2017

Mike Janke, co-founder of Data Tribe, tells us why his company has invested in Baltimore, and why tech companies can flourish here. 

Long Meadow Ranch

Aug 30, 2017

Click on the image for the list. 

Autism is No Match for Jake

Aug 30, 2017
Zach Chisholm/flickr

Kelly Anastaci, a special educator at Kennedy Krieger’s Montgomery County School, tells Dr. Lana Warren about a student who refuses to be limited by his diagnosis with autism spectrum disorder and how he is helping others understand those with autism better. 

Marinas.com

As sea levels have risen because of climate change, and the geology beneath the Chesapeake region has settled naturally over the last two centuries, more than 500 islands – large and small – have vanished beneath the waves.

Some of these bay islands held hideaways for pirates, hunting lodges for the rich, brothels for watermen, the sites of illegal boxing matches and gambling dens, even an unusual enterprise to breed and skin black cats to sell their fur to China. This last scheme failed when the bay froze and the cats, wisely, ran off across the ice, according to William Cronin’s book, The Disappearing Islands of the Chesapeake.  Others – such as Sharp’s Island and Holland Island -- were simply the homes of farmers and fishermen, or mosquito-infested scabs of marsh grass.

On a recent afternoon, I set off in a kayak to find a tiny island that – strangely enough – has been heading in the opposite direction: rising from the bay, and  growing over the years.

 


Click on the image for the book list. 

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