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WYPR Election Coverage

WYPR Primary Election 2018 Coverage

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AP Photo/Patrick Semansky

Learn about the candidates' positions and hear from the candidates themselves in this roundup of WYPR coverage. Primary day is June 26. Early voting runs until June 21. 

@TheRealJMcNair/Twitter

There are questions that need answering in the wake of the death last week of former University of Maryland football player Jordan McNair.

Some of those questions may not be resolved until an external review is conducted by the athletic department, but there’s one question that doesn’t need to wait for any review and ought to be the first one to be answered:

Exactly what was McNair or any of his teammates doing on a practice field on May 29?

John Lee

 

Early voting is under way and Baltimore County residents will for the first time elect some of the members of the school board. The way it’s being done can be confusing, but there are those who think electing school board members is the key to mending the current, fractured board. WYPR’s John Lee joined Nathan Sterner in the studio to talk about it.

 

 

Maryland House of Delegates

The state legislature’s ethics committee is investigating Baltimore City House Delegation Chair Curt Anderson for alleged sexual misconduct.

Things are looking up for the Chesapeake Bay, according to scientists at the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science.

The scientists released a report card on the bay’s health Friday morning that found the "positive trajectory" they’ve noted in recent years is now "statistically significant."

Ivan Bates Campaign, Marilyn Mosby Campaign, and Thiru Vignarajah Campaign.

The race for Baltimore State’s Attorney has become one of the most contentious in the city’s history, and it’s anyone’s guess who will win the top prosecutor’s job.

John Lee

The race for the Republican nomination for Baltimore County Executive pits an establishment candidate with the governor’s seal of approval against a self-described crusader who is counting on votes from Trump supporters. The battle between State Insurance Commissioner Al Redmer Junior and Delegate Pat McDonough has been contentious.

Rachel Baye

Former Montgomery County Council Member Valerie Ervin is dropping out of the governor’s race and endorsing Prince George’s County Executive Rushern Baker, she announced Wednesday.

Recent Immigrants Shut Out of Elite High Schools

Jun 13, 2018

Updated 3:32 p.m., 06-14-18

While Baltimore’s schools are losing students every year, there is one population that is growing rapidly: students whose first language isn’t English. But many of those students are shut out of the elite city high schools.

Now, a group of Latinx students at Baltimore City College is trying to change that.

Rachel Baye

Four Democratic candidates for governor and three for lieutenant governor discussed education policy at a forum Tuesday night hosted by the Real News Network in Baltimore.

The forum’s focus was the state panel studying how to revise Maryland’s education funding formulas and modernize the state’s approach to education more broadly. The group is known as the Kirwan Commission because it’s led by University System of Maryland Chancellor Emeritus Brit Kirwan. It plans to publish its recommendations at the end of the year, and they are expected to come with a large price tag.

Mosby: 'Nothing to Hide' on Conviction Rate

Jun 12, 2018

Incumbent Baltimore City State’s Attorney Marilyn Mosby has come under fire from her challengers for supposedly exaggerating her conviction rate. But Mosby insisted during an appearance on WYPR's Midday Monday that she’s not hiding anything.

Mosby has been touting a 90-plus percent conviction rate ahead of the June 26 primary. But her challengers say that rate doesn’t count cases she had to drop and that distorts the picture.

 

Dominique Maria Bonessi

Five bills were introduced at Monday night’s Baltimore City Council meeting that would bring major changes to the city’s charter. WYPR’s Dominique Maria Bonessi spoke with Morning Edition Host Nathan Sterner about the changes.

@Capitals/Twitter

How do you quantify frustration, in a sports context?

How much pain and ache can a heart take over a team’s repeated failures?

And how long do you wait for success before you give up hope?

For hockey fans in this region, those questions have seemed to have no answers since the day in 1974 when the Washington Capitals began play in the NHL.

Rachel Baye

Democratic state Sen. Richard Madaleno has known he wanted to run for office since he was 9 years old.

Mary Rose Madden / wypr

Baltimore’s police department was already notorious (see the 2016 DOJ report).   

But this year, eight former police officers were convicted on federal racketeering charges stemming from an FBI investigation. They belonged to an elite task force charged with getting guns off the city’s streets. Instead, the plainclothes cops roamed Baltimore neighborhoods at will, robbing people on the street, breaking into homes to steal money, drugs or guns and planting evidence on their victims.   

Corrupt Cops Get Stiff Sentences

Jun 8, 2018

Two members of the Baltimore Police Department’s disbanded Gun Trace Task Force were sentenced to lengthy prison terms Thursday for a host of crimes ranging from racketeering to wire fraud.

U.S. District Judge Catherine Blake sentenced Sgt. Wayne Jenkins, a leader of the disgraced task force, to 25 years, five years less than the maximum prosecutors had requested. She sentenced Marcus Taylor, one of only two members of the unit to stand trial, to 18 years.

John Lee

Construction is getting under way on the controversial $350 million Towson Row project after years of delay. Once it’s done, it will be home for shops, offices, student housing, residences and a hotel. The project is considered the transformational centerpiece of Towson’s redevelopment. But only one of the candidates running for Baltimore County Executive  supports it.

 

 

Photo courtesy BCPS

The Baltimore County School Board Thursday night voted to make Verletta White the Interim School Superintendent for another year, beginning July 1. The vote was 8-4, with the board divided between the majority that wanted to make White the permanent superintendent, and the minority that opposes her.

 

 

AP Photo/Patrick Semansky

The nine Democrats running for governor faced off Wednesday in their fourth debate, which was taped and will air on WMAR-2 News on June 13 at 8 p.m. WYPR’s Rachel Baye discusses the debate with Nathan Sterner.

John Lee

The Baltimore County School Board meets Thursday evening to talk about naming an interim school superintendent for the next year. The issue of whether the current interim superintendent, Verletta White, should remain on the job is dividing not only the school board, but the candidates running for county executive as well.

 

 

Eric Minor

By the end of this week, five of the eight convicted cops from the Baltimore Police Department's disbanded Gun Trace Task Force will have been sentenced and could be serving anywhere from 10 to 30 years in federal prison.

Six of them pleaded guilty and two were found guilty by a jury on federal charges of racketeering, conspiracy to racketeer and wire fraud for falsifying overtime claims. The case has left some wondering why it took federal, rather than local, Baltimore  authorities to catch this crew.  

John Lee

Democratic voters in Baltimore County soon will be making a choice between three political veterans who are running for the party’s nomination for county executive. Early voting begins next week, on June 14.

 

The hotly contested three-way race is between State Senator Jim Brochin, County Councilwoman Vicki Almond, and former State Delegate Johnny Olszewski Jr.

 

 

Tom Newby/flickr

Ten years ago, St. Francis Academy, the oldest continuously operating, predominately African-American Catholic school in the United States, launched a football program.

The theory after more than 150 years of no football was that the game would give boys at the East Baltimore school something to do after school that would keep them away from gangs.

At the time, I did a series of stories for WYPR on the growing pains of the program, so I know how special football is for that school.

Today, the Panthers are at the center of a controversy that touches on the question of how much success is too much, as well as on race.

Dominique Maria Bonessi

  

Two months ago Mayor Catherine Pugh said Baltimore’s Department of Transportation would begin in June to crack down on drivers who let themselves get caught in the middle of an intersection when the light changes—known as “blocking the box.”

Well, that hasn’t happened, yet. And it may not for a while.

The Chesapeake Associated Press Broadcasters Association (CAPBA) honored WYPR with two awards at its annual ceremony on Saturday. WYPR reporter John Lee won for Outstanding Editorial or Commentary for "One Virginian's Take on Confederate Monuments" and Outstanding Feature or Human Interest Story for "Farms That Go ‘Boom’ Annoying Neighbors in Baltimore County." 

Midday host Tom Hall was recognized as a finalist for Outstanding Talk Show for "Freddie Gray, Two Years On: Baltimore Community Perspectives” and reporter Rachel Baye was a finalist for Outstanding Enterprise Reporting for "Maryland Poor Get Little Help on Child Care." 

In an era of sharp, partisan infighting, Maryland’s Democratic Senator Ben Cardin has helped craft a sweeping bipartisan bill that could go a long way to deal with Maryland’s water infrastructure issues. And proponents say it may be one of the few bills that can gt through Congress in this election year.

Cardin says the bill that’s aimed at revitalizing the nation’s ailing water infrastructure is key for Maryland because it offers a blue print for how the nation deals with clean water and ports.

AP

The flood that ripped through Ellicott City last Sunday, destroying homes and businesses and claiming one life was devastating. But it wasn’t anything new. Ellicott City has had a long history of floods.

In fact, the first grist mill, built by James Hood in 1766, was destroyed a mere two years later by one of the earliest recorded floods.

The town flooded again in 1817 and 1837. And then there was the flood of 1868 that killed 43 people and destroyed 14 homes.

Dominique Maria Bonessi

With a storm watch remaining in effect through 2 a.m. Friday, Ellicott City residents and business owners gird for another round of possible flash flooding.

Dominique Maria Bonessi

In this school year, nine Baltimore City students died as a result of violence. CEO of Schools Sonja Santelises and Mayor Catherine Pugh held a memorial vigil Wednesday for  them and all city school students.

Smithsonian Environmental Research Center

Maryland’s rivers once teemed with a fish called river herring, the generic name for alewife and blueback herring.

A century ago, watermen on the Choptank River caught millions of these fish that live in the ocean, but return to fresh water to spawn in a single year. 

But the population has plummeted, thanks to overfishing, dams that block their paths upstream to spawning grounds and habitat loss.

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