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Fraser Smith and Karen Hosler, of the WYPR news team, talk about Republican efforts to retake Maryland's Sixth Congressional District seat with a 74-year-old "young gun."

Rachel Baye

On sunny days, you might have to look a little harder to find evidence of sewage overflows on the Jones Falls Trail. But it’s there.

P. Kenneth Burns

As expected, the Baltimore City Council passed Monday the largest tax financing package for a development in city history.

The 12-1-2 vote – for each bill - came after months of controversy over the size of the tax package and requirements for jobs, wages and housing.  The three-bill package creates the Port Covington development and taxing districts and authorizes $660 million in tax bonds to finance infrastructure work at the site.

The bonds would be repaid with property tax revenue generated by the profit.

Councilmen Bill Henry and Mary Pat Clarke abstained from voting on the package.  Councilman Warren Branch voted against the bills.

Joel McCord

A few years ago, scientists began worrying that blue catfish, the much larger cousins of those squirmy, yellowish bottom feeders, might take over in Chesapeake Bay. They’re big—better than 100 pounds in some cases--voracious eaters and they’re prolific. So, at least one seafood wholesaler appropriated a slogan applied to other invasive fish--eat ‘em to beat ‘em—and began aggressively marketing them. And local watermen have found a new market and seemingly endless supply. 

What? No spring break?

Sep 16, 2016
Baltimore County

    

It looks like spring break could be on the chopping block for Baltimore County school students during the 2017-2018 school year. WYPR’s John Lee joins Morning Edition host Nathan Sterner to talk about the changes and to tie it all to Governor Larry Hogan’s executive order to start school after Labor Day.

In 2001, as the American Civil Liberties Union of Ohio and the Black United Front brought a federal lawsuit against the city of Cincinnati and the police department for racial bias, a white officer in Cincinnati shot an unarmed black teenager as he fled police.

And then, along came a lengthy U.S. Department of Justice investigation that found a pattern of discriminatory practices by the department and an agreement for changes that took months to hammer out. The process of instituting those changes has lasted years. Some would say it’s ongoing.

John Lee

So, if you want to draw a crowd on a college campus, offer up free ice cream. Earlier this week, dozens of students lined up at the ice cream truck parked outside the Towson University Union It was one of the inauguration week events for University President Kim Schatzel. She was out there working the crowd and posing for selfies.

A Baltimore mayoral commission released Wednesday formalized recommendations to remove two city-owned Confederate monuments.

The commission studied four monuments in particular; the Lee Jackson Monument in the Wyman Park Dell, the Roger B. Taney Monument at Mt. Vernon Place, the Confederate Soldiers and Sailors Monument on Mt. Royal Avenue near Mosher Street and the Confederate Women’s of Maryland Monument at Bishop Square Park.

In January, it recommended removing the monuments to Taney, author of the Dred Scott decision, and Robert E. Lee and Stonewall Jackson and keeping the other two.

The report also explained the history behind each monument.

United States Department of the Interior, GIS

    

The mood was bright and optimistic when a dozen or so Republican women posed for a recent campaign gathering in Severna Park with Mark Plaster. They were eager to help the GOP candidate give Democrat John Sarbanes the only serious challenge he’s faced since first winning Maryland’s Third District congressional seat 10 years ago.

John Lee

Sparrows Point, once the home to Bethlehem Steel in Southeast Baltimore County, is starting to come back to life. And more than a year into the Point’s rebirth, there are already hundreds of jobs on site, due in part to what the steel-making giant left behind.

Back in January, officials announced that Fed Ex would be the first major tenant at the Point, with plans to build a distribution center. It’s expected to open in the spring with about 150 employees. A few weeks ago, Under Armour said it was going to build an e-commerce distribution center with about 1,000 employees expected.

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