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Rachel Baye

Democrats in the General Assembly and environmental activists called Thursday for Gov. Larry Hogan to challenge President Donald Trump’s proposed $73 million cut eliminating the Chesapeake Bay Program. During Thursday's floor session, the legislators introduced a resolution criticizing the cuts and directing Hogan to act.

Rachel Baye

Seventeen-year-old Julia Francis was playing pinball with her older brother A.J. Francis at Crabtowne USA in Glen Burnie.

“I’m just trying to prove myself better than this guy,” said Julia, a junior at nearby Old Mill High School.

“Never happens,” her brother, a defensive lineman for the Washington Redskins, said from one pinball machine over. “I’m always the one that comes out on top, even when it comes to pinball. Mainly because I’ve been playing for a decade longer.”

The siblings were surprised to learn about a Maryland law that prohibits minors from playing pinball in public places in certain parts of the state.

Flickr: Maryland GovPics

Democrats in the state Senate are offering a plan that would create an independent commission to redraw Maryland’s congressional districts if five other states in the region agree to do the same. The bill was voted out of committee just as Gov. Larry Hogan’s proposed redistricting reform bill died.

Photo by K. Whiteford

Monday was a busy day in Annapolis, where state lawmakers hurried to meet a legislative deadline. Any bills not passed by either the state Senate or the House of Delegates by the end of the day have to go through the Rules Committee before they can continue on. WYPR’s Rachel Baye joins Nathan Sterner to talk about what bills made the cut and what will face additional hurdles.

Rachel Baye / WYPR

Maryland’s House of Delegates gave preliminary approval Monday to a bill prohibiting state and local police from enforcing federal immigration law.

The bill prevents state and local police from inquiring about immigration status during a traffic stop or an unrelated arrest. It also prohibits state and local corrections officers from holding someone based on what’s known as a “detainer,” a request by federal Immigration and Customs Enforcement, or ICE, agents to keep someone without a warrant while they look into his or her immigration status.

Sarah Elbeshbishi/The Current

The NCAA men’s and women’s basketball tournaments, known in some circles as March Madness, officially launched last week to run through early April.

But, if you ask Je’Nan Hayes, March Madness didn’t wait for last Thursday to get started. It had already begun.

Hayes is a junior at Watkins Mill High School in Montgomery County. She’s a reserve on the school’s girls basketball team, which had a pretty successful 2017 season, getting all the way to the regional finals of the state tournament.

As the Watkins Mill school newspaper first reported, Hayes, who is Muslim and wears a hijab, a head covering used by female practitioners of the faith, had played in the Wolverines’ first 24 games.

Rachel Baye

The state Senate passed paid sick leave legislation with a veto-proof majority Thursday, just one day after Gov. Larry Hogan promised to veto it.

Pugh asks the city to come together

Mar 16, 2017

On the 100th day of her term, Baltimore Mayor Catherine Pugh asked the city to come together; to volunteer in schools, create jobs and cheer the success of Baltimore.  It was part of the State of the City address she delivered Thursday.

Trump budget eviscerates bay restoration funds

Mar 16, 2017

President Trump's budget blueprint to "Make American Great Again" cuts $73 million from EPA, the entire budget for the Chesapeake Bay Program, the multi-agency effort that oversees bay restoration programs.

The cuts would remove EPA oversight of the Chesapeake Bay's so-called pollution diet to clean up the bay and its streams, creeks and rivers and drew sharp rebukes from bay scientists.

Baltimore Clayworks in debt and up for sale

Mar 16, 2017
Brendan Reynolds

In response to a growing debt, Baltimore Clayworks, a 35-year-old collective of ceramic artists in Mt. Washington, has placed its buildings up for sale, raising fears among its members of a break-up.

Kathryn Holt, chair of the board of trustees, said the non-profit organization is “looking to become a little more fiscally responsible” and “looking at a variety of ways to get there.”

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