WYPR News | WYPR

WYPR News

News coverage, Series and Commentary from WYPR's award winning news staff.
Series from WYPR Newsroom.

Eclipse fever

Aug 21, 2017
Mary Rose Madden

The moon’s shadow swept across the sun Monday afternoon, totally obscuring it in some parts of the country, and blotting out about 80 percent of it Maryland. It was the first coast to coast solar eclipse in the US in a century and thousands turned out in Baltimore to catch a glimpse.

William Yeung/flickr

College students are only now starting to report for the new school year, and the first serious athletic competitions are a few weeks away.

But the scene is set for one of the biggest showdowns in college sports history between the NCAA and one of its highest profile member schools.

The outcome may go a long way to defining what a student-athlete is as well as determine whether the organization that governs college athletics can, in fact, play a role in academics.

Solar Eclipse 2017

Aug 21, 2017
Courtesy of Romeo Durscher/NASA

It is indeed dark during the day as a total solar eclipse makes its way from Oregon to South Carolina. Eleven states are in the path of total darkness. Follow the astronomical phenomenon's journey across America along with NPR journalists and others experiencing the eclipse.

A statue of former Supreme Court Chief Justice Roger B. Taney was removed from the State House grounds early Friday morning, following a key state committee vote, cast by email earlier this week. Taney is best known for writing the 1857 Dred Scott decision that upheld slavery by ruling that black people could not be US citizens.

But a day after the State House Trust voted, Senate President Mike Miller jumped to Taney’s defense.

Mary Rose Madden

Baltimore quietly removed four Confederate monuments Tuesday night, responding to activists who called for them to be taken down after a white supremacist rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, last weekend turned deadly.

Documenting Hate

Aug 16, 2017

Driven by the lack of reliable data on the number of hate crimes that occur in the U.S., ProPublica, an independent, nonprofit newsroom recently joined with partners to launch Documenting Hate, an initiative that collects stories about bias incidents and hate crimes. 

National and local data, user-submitted reports, and social media monitoring will allow journalists and civil rights groups to get a more accurate picture of hate crimes and acts of intimidation--in person and online. 

P. Kenneth Burns

Earlier this year, Baltimore entered into a consent decree with the Department of Justice to reform the city police department. As part of the agreement, an independent monitor will keep track of the changes made and report publicly on the progress.

Tuesday night, the city hosted the first of two forums where community members could hear from the four finalists considered for monitors.

WYPR's Matt Tacka and Rachel Baye discuss what happened at the forum and the process for selecting the monitor.

Mary Rose Madden

Four Confederate monuments in Baltimore were torn down overnight at the order of Mayor Catherine Pugh. She said she was concerned about the “safety and security” of the people of Baltimore after a white supremacist rally in Charlottesville, Va. Saturday turned deadly.

The action came after the Baltimore City Council adopted a resolution Monday calling for their removal. It also pre-empted calls from local activist groups to tear down one of the statues on Wednesday.

Mayor Catherine Pugh’s watered down bill aimed at imposing a mandatory minimum one-year sentence for possession of an illegal gun survived a preliminary vote in the city council Monday night.

The 8-7 vote came after opponents gathered outside City Hall demonstrate against the bill.

Dominique Maria Bonessi

Two weeks ago, state officials gathered in a shopping center parking lot in Dundalk to declare August first Henrietta Lacks Day. Last night, the Baltimore City Council adopted a resolution to follow suit. The resolution honors the woman whose cancer cells, taken by Johns Hopkins doctors in 1951 without her knowledge or consent, led to advances in treatment of polio, cancer, HIV/AIDS and other diseases.

Lack of patient consent, compounded by a history of mistrust of medical institutions, still reverberates in Baltimore’s gay black community.

Pages