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WYPR Programs

Iraqi Jewish Archives

During a search for weapons of mass destruction in 2003, it was discovered that Saddam Hussein’s intelligence headquarters held priceless artifacts ... then the building was bombed and burst water pipes and flooded the basement nearly destroying the contents. Marvin Pinkert, the director The Jewish Museum of Maryland, tells the story behind the dramatic rescue of these artifacts, several of which are featured in the museum's latest exhibit, “Discovery and Recovery: Preserving Iraqi Jewish Heritage.” The centuries-old records detail communal life, religious practices and eventual persecution of Jews in Iraq.

Louis Blank tells the story about how even the uninvited guests to his wedding felt special. Don't miss the Stoop’s season kickoff, The Stoop in The Dark: Stories about the Unseen, Unknown, and Untold, Thursday, October 26, 7:00 pm at the The Senator Theatre. You can find information and more stories at stoopstorytelling dot com.

AP Photo

It's another edition of the Midday News Wrap, our Friday discussion of some of the week's top news stories with a panel of journalists and commentators.  Joining Tom Hall on this week's panel: reporter Jenna Johnson, who covered the 2016 Trump Campaign.  Now, she covers the White House for The Washington Post, and she joins Tom on the line from The Post's radio studio.  Also on the panel and with us in Studio A is Pastor Shannon Wright.  She is the Third  Vice-Chair of the Maryland Republican Party and the first Black woman ever elected to any party office in Maryland.  In 2016, she was a Republican candidate for president of the Baltimore City Council.  She is also the co-host of the Wright Way With Shannon and Mike morning show  and a panelist on Roland Martin on News One.

Photo courtesy Liz Simmons

Now, a little music to take us into the weekend.  Low Lily is a vocal and string trio from Vermont whose modern acoustic sound also taps the roots of folk and fiddle music.  They join Tom live in Studio A. 

Low Lily is:  Liz Simmons on guitar.  Flynn Cohen on guitar and mandolin.  And Lissa  Schneckenburger on fiddle.

They’ll be playing at Germano’s Piattini in Little Italy here in Baltimore on Friday night.  Use the link to get details.

The Sixth Branch

Few neighborhood rebuilding groups can claim they’re driven by a military sense of purpose. Today we hear from Rich Moore, founder of The Sixth Branch in Baltimore. He and Scott Goldman, the nonprofit's executive director talk about how the group channels the leadership skills and commitment of military veterans to serve local communities through organizing, building and maintaining projects. Regina Hammond, joins us too, to talk about the lasting impact The Sixth Branch has had on the Johnson Square neighborhood. Find out how you can get involved here.

Photo courtesy The Aspen Institute

In his biographies of Benjamin Franklin, Albert Einstein and Steve Jobs, the historian Walter Isaacson has been drawn to his subjects by their uncanny capacity to make connections across disciplines, combining technical expertise with an artist’s eye for beauty, line and grace.  In his latest opus, Isaacson chronicles perhaps history’s greatest creative genius: the 15th century Italian artist, scientist and inventor, Leonardo Da Vinci.  From The Mona Lisa to The Last Supper, DaVinci's iconic paintings revolutionized how artists observed the world, and in fields as disparate as geology, botany, anatomy and engineering, he made lasting contributions.  Walter Isaacson joins Tom on the line from New York City to talk about the nature of genius, and the rewards of insatiable curiosity.

Photo by Matthew Murphy, 2017

It's Thursday, and that means our peripatetic theater critic, J. Wynn Rousuck, joins Tom in Studio A to review one of the region's many new stage productions.  Today, Judy's talking about the newly-revived traveling production of the Tony-Award-winning The Color Purple: The Musical, whose six-day run at The Hippodrome Theatre in Baltimore continues until this Sunday, October 22.

 

On Saturday, thousands of runners will hit the streets to participate in the Baltimore Running Festival. More than 24,000 runners from all 50 states and 30 nations are expected to descend on the Charm City to run our historic streets. That’s a lot of folks taking a lot of steps, and that leaves a lot of room for twisted ankles, swollen knees and sore backs.  

Dr. Miho Tanaka is an orthopedic surgeon and the Director of the Women’s Sports Medicine Program at Johns Hopkins Hospital. Before moving to Baltimore, she was the team physician for WNBA teams the St. Louis Cardinals and the St. Louis Surge. She also served as assistant team physician for the Baltimore Orioles and professional women’s basketball team, the NY Liberty.

She joins Tom to talk about ways to avoid injuries on race day and beyond. 

Dean Shareski / Flickr via Creative Commons

One of the most common learning disabilities - dyslexia - complicates how a child learns to read and write. Because their brains are wired differently, students with dyslexia are at risk of falling behind their peers.

A radio documentary by APM Reports - Hard to Read: How American Schools Fail Kids with Dyslexia -  highlights the challenges dyslexic students in Baltimore County face in getting the services they need. Producer Emily Hanford tells us how the great debate over how to teach reading is leaving kids behind.

And Pamela Guest, an advocate with Decoding Dyslexia - Marylanddescribes the frustration of watching her son struggle to read. Guest is also the editor of IEP Magazine.

After a devastating fire in March 2016, The Book Thing--a free book depot--is back! Founder Russell Wattenberg tells us about the path to rebuilding and how the community stepped up.

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