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Stories from the Stoop: Fabiola Ramirez

Apr 21, 2017

Time now for a Stoop story. This week we hear an immigrant family’s tale of courage, strength and perseverance. Here’s Fabiola Ramirez, sharing her family’s story of coming to the US and thriving against all odds.

Reporting Child Abuse

Apr 21, 2017
Baltimore Child Abuse Facebook page

When kids are the victims of child abuse, they often don’t realize it--they need adults to speak for them. We ask the head of the Baltimore Child Abuse Center, Adam Rosenberg, about who has a responsibility to report child abuse, how to do it, and what resources are available for victims.

Photo by Getty Images

It's the Midday News Wrap, our weekly roundtable on the week's major local, national and international developments, with a rotating panel of journalists and commentators.

We're approaching the 100-Day mark in the Trump administration: Republicans hold the House, the Senate and the White House, and yet -- while the Senate did approve Supreme Court justice Neil Gorsuch --President Trump has had little to show for as far as legislative victories are concerned.  What’s next on the president’s agenda?  Another attempt to repeal and replace the ACA?  Or perhaps he’ll move his long-promised tax reform agenda to the front burner, although we’re still waiting to see a tax reform proposal of any kind.   

Bill O’Reilly has lost his job, but Fox has helped leaven the pain of that loss for him with a $25 million dollar check, despite more than a dozen complaints that he is an indecent creep.  Even creeps have contracts, it appears.

And in Georgia, a young filmmaker came within 2 points of an outright victory for a seat in Congress.  An untested Democrat, Jon Ossoff, got 48% of the vote in a field of 18 mostly Republican candidates, just short of what he needed to win without a runoff.  Former Georgia Secretary of State Karen Handel got less than 20%.  They’ll face each other head-to-head in June.  Polls today have them tied. 

Speaking of elections, the French are set to begin voting this Sunday in their presidential election.  There are 11 candidates in that race, four of whom are polling close to each other.   

And in the UK, Prime Minister Theresa May, who is preparing the British exit from the EU, has called for a national election in June -- three years ahead of schedule.  

In Turkey, voters seem to have narrowly approved President Recep Tayip Erdogan’s bid to consolidate his power.  President Trump quickly congratulated the Turkish leader, but critics have called the vote an erosion of democracy.

Arkansas, amid protests and court rulings, last night, carried out its first execution in more than a decade.

Here in Baltimore, Wednesday was the second anniversary of the death of Freddie Gray. 

And Dallas Dance, Baltimore’s charismatic school superintendent still in the first year of a four-year contract, announced, surprisingly, that he will retire at the end of June.  

Joining Tom on the News Wrap panel today:

Dr. Zeynep Tufekci is contributing opinion writer at the New York Times and author of  the new book Twitter and Tear Gas: The Power and Fragility of Networked Protests.  She joins Tom on the line from Chapel Hill, where she is an associate professor at the University of North Carolina.

Kamau High joins us in Studio A.   He is managing editor of the Afro-American Newspaper, based here in Baltimore, and a former reporter and digital producer in New York City for the Wall Street Journal, The Financial Times, among others.

Michael Fletcher is also here today.  He is a senior writer at ESPN’s The Undefeated.  He was for many years a national economics reporter and a White House reporter for The Washington Post, and before THAT,  he was a reporter for many years at The Baltimore Sun. 

Science Not Silence

Apr 20, 2017
March for Science Facebook page

Thousands of scientists and supporters of science are painting protest signs, filling their water bottles and laying out their walking shoes for the first-ever March for Science in Washington on April 22, 2017. Scores of events are planned in other cities too. Some scientists are boycotting, fearful the march will tarnish the credibility of science. But Marnie Halpern, on the faculty of the Carnegie Institution for Science, plans to take part with a busload of colleagues. She says it's less about protesting policies of the Trump administration than about normally reticent scientists shining a light on their research.

Photo courtesy Dr. Axe

For most of us, there’s at least one food we just can’t think about eating: otherwise-respectable fare like broccoli or Brussels sprouts, cabbage or kale, organ meats or sardines, tofu or…gorgonzola cheese. One look, or one whiff, and our minds tell us, no way…  

Today we're going to explore ways we might get around such food blocks, on this installment of What Ya Got Cooking? -- a regular Midday feature where we talk about recipes, food trends, traditions and good eats with our resident foodies:  John Shields and Sascha Wolhandler. 

John Shields is a chef, cookbook author and, with partner John Gilligan, the proprietor of Gertrude’s Restaurant at the Baltimore Museum of Art.  He’s also the host of Coastal Cooking and Chesapeake Bay Cooking with John Shields on Maryland Public Television and PBS.

Sascha Wolhandler runs Sascha’s 527 Cafe with her husband, Steve Susser.  

John and Sascha join Tom today with their tips for overcoming food aversions with a little creative cooking…and they share a few ideas for making the most of the delicious new spring veggies now available at local farmers markets

So, what foods do YOU avoid?  Got a recipe that’s changed your mind about a food you’ve always hated?  You’re welcome to join the conversation!

photo by Jeremy Daniel

Theater critic J. Wynn Rousuck joins Tom each Thursday to share her impressions of the region's thespian offerings. This week she's here with a review of the touring company production of the Broadway musical Something Rotten!, now playing at Baltimore's Hippodrome Theatre.    

A musical comedy brought together on stage by the director of Aladdin and co-director of The Book of Mormon and the producer of Rent, Avenue Q and In the Heights, Something Rotten! tells the story of brothers Nick and Nigel Bottom, two Renaissance-era playwrights mired in the shadow of their rockstar contemporary, Will Shakespeare. After a fortune-teller informs them that the next big trend in theater will involve plays that feature singing, dancing and acting at the same time, the brothers decide to produce the world's first musical. Their efforts provide Something Rotten!'s driving energy.

The musical's New York production opened in April 2015. The National Tour commenced in January of this year, with three Broadway principals reprising their roles: Rob McClure as Nick Bottom, Adam Pascal as Shakespeare and Josh Grisetti as Nigel Bottom. The touring cast also features Maggie Lakis as Bea, Blake Hammond as Nostradamus, Autumn Hurlbert as Portia, Scott Cote as Brother Jeremiah and Jeff Brooks as Shylock.

The original musical is directed and choreographed by Tony Award winner Casey Nicholaw (The Book of Mormon, Aladdin), with music and lyrics by Grammy Award winner and Tony Award nominee Wayne Kirkpatrick and Golden Globe Award and Tony Award nominee Karey Kirkpatrick, and a book by Tony Award nominees Karey Kirkpatrick and best-selling author John O’Farrell.

Something Rotten! continues at the Hippodrome Theatre in Baltimore for a limited engagement from Tuesday, April 18 to Sunday, April 23.

Hi all, We're working on a whole new season of Out of the Blocks with the help of a brilliant team of folks at PRX's Project Catapult.  If you want to know what we're up to, check out our interview with Rob Rosenthal on his podcast, HowSound.  We'll be back with you by mid-June!

Flickr/Franco Folini

Last month, the outcry from concerned parents and citizens about the number of missing teenage girls in and around Washington, D.C. sparked national outrage. The conversation was prompted by the dozens of missing persons alerts with pictures of black and brown teenage girls shared on social media over a short period of time.

There were theories and fears that the girls were being preyed upon by human traffickers. The hashtag #MissingDCGirls trended on Twitter; celebrities and politicians weighed in, and Washington DC Mayor Muriel Bowser announced a task force that will increase the number of police officers assigned to work missing persons cases, among other things. It turns out, that, according to the DC Metropolitan Police Department, the actual number of missing children has decreased over the last two years.  

Get Out for Earth Day 2017

Apr 19, 2017
barnyz / Flickr via Creative Commons

Three days before Earth Day 2017 we look at several efforts to build momentum for a healthy environment. Up first, Carl Simon, interim director of the environmental watchdog group “Blue Water Baltimore,” tells us about a host of activities for Earth Day, from down-and-dirty trash removal to fledgling trees and flowers for planting. 

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