Maryland Morning with Sheilah Kast

Monday, Wednesday, Friday: 9 a.m - 10 a.m.

We find the most intriguing voices to take you behind Maryland headlines. Find out more about us, check out shows that aired prior to February 2014, listen to our series, and listen to each day's show.

Got a question or comment? E-mail us at mdmorning@wypr.org. You can also leave us a voicemail or text us at (410) 881-3162.

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Maryland Morning
8:55 am
Fri August 21, 2015

The Lines Between Us: Dismanting Structural Inequality

Left to Right: Lisa Williams, Lisa Gary, Lawrence Lanahan.
Credit Christopher Moore// threedaysatsea.com

We’re listening to some of the reporting of our year-long series from a couple years ago, The Lines Between Us, looking deep into the roots of inequality in the Baltimore region.  We wrapped up the series two years ago with a focus o  n what to do about disparities with a public discussion on what tools  local, state, and federal government have to dismantle structural inequality. Joining us was Lisa Garry is director of system reform projects with the Department of Juvenile Services. She has worked for a long time on the issue of racial disparities in contact with the juvenile justice system.  Also joining the discussion was Lisa Williams, director of the Office of Equity and Cultural Proficiency with Baltimore County Public Schools.

Maryland Morning
8:45 am
Fri August 21, 2015

A Tale Of Two Houses: More On The Wealth Gap

We’re going to loop back now to our review of the wealth gap, from our series The Lines Between Us, which focused the causes of racial and class disparities in the Baltimore region. Earlier we heard the story of Isaac Joseph Bacon, an African-American World War II veteran.  In 1950, he bought a house in a nice neighborhood by Druid Hill Park. It’s close to landmarks we heard a lot about this spring, during the riot and protests after Freddie Gray’s funeral.  The house is about two blocks south of Mondawmin Mall, and about six blocks north of Penn North.  Home values did not appreciate in that neighborhood, and as Mr. Bacon grew frail in his late 80s, his family scrambled to pay for assisted living.

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Maryland Morning
9:00 am
Wed August 19, 2015

Ta-Nehisi Coates On Race, Growing Up In Baltimore

Ta-Nehisi Coates is national correspondent for The Atlantic. He is also the author of New York Times Bestseller Between The World And Me.

Events like the deaths of Freddie Gray and Eric Garner in police custody have sharpened the country discussion’s of violence and race. A month ago, Ta-Nehisi Coates, a writer whose blog at the Atlantic.com is destination reading for many, released his memoir: Between The World And Me. Written as a letter to his son, it expresses Coates’ experience of being black in America.  Six years ago, I spoke with Ta-Nehisi about his first memoir, his understanding of race as he was growing up in Baltimore and how he was taught by his father, Paul Coates. 

Among his accomplishments Paul Coates can list service in the U.S. Army in Vietnam, work as a university librarian, activism as a Black Panther, founding and running an Afro-centric publishing house, Black Classic Press in Baltimore and raising seven kids against great odds. 

Ta-Nehisi Coates published The Beautiful Struggle: A Father, Two Sons and an Unlikely Road to Manhood  in 2009, and he and his father joined me in the studio to talk about that unlikely road. I asked Ta-Nehisi what made his family unique. 

Maryland Morning
8:55 am
Wed August 19, 2015

Margo Christie On Baltimore's Debaucherous Adult Entertainment District

Credit Margo Christie

No burlesque dancer on The Block, Baltimore’s legendary downtown strip of debauchery and Adult Entertainment, has risen to more fame and notoriety than Blaze Starr. She brought flair, playful humor, and an outsized personality to the stage, where she charmed patrons for decades. And, she also charmed a Louisiana governor in the 1950s, having an affair that inspired the 1989 film, “Blaze”. Blaze Starr died in June at the age of 83.

Writer Margo Christie began stripping on The Block in 1978 at the age of 16. She heard stories about the legendary Blaze Starr and recently wrote about the influence Starr had in The Baltimore Sun. In 2013, Christie published a novel set on The Block in the 1970s. It’s called These Days. It tells the story of a starry-eyed teenager, Becky Shelling, who dreams of being a movie star, and who loves the music and films of her parent’s generation. A relationship with a smooth-talking older man leads her to working as a stripper on “The Block”. Tom spoke with Margo Christie about the book in January. 

Maryland Morning
8:45 am
Wed August 19, 2015

A Marylander's Uplifting Memoir

The cover of Leroy Hoffberger's memoir.

On average, major depressive disorder impacts the lives of about 14.8 million American adults every year. And on average about one in four Americans suffer from a diagnosable mental disorder at any given time. As we learn more and more about mental illness, we find that some unlikely people have battled with it.

At 89, LeRoy Hoffberger can look back on a full life brokering investments and business deals, fostering Jewish education, supporting health research, collecting art.  When he was still a boy his father and uncles were involved in myriad businesses - from Pompeian Olive Oil to the Baltimore Orioles to ice, coal, fuel oil and beer. Roy Hoffberger expanded the family’s reach to other enterprises including real estate - especially the development of Germantown.

Yet, Hoffberger has battled depression all his life. He started writing his memoirs seven years ago. The book he produced is titled, Measure of a Life: Memoirs, Insights and Philosophies of Leroy E. Hoffberger.  Sheilah sat down with him last December to talk about his work and his struggle with depression.

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